Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence http://sethgillihan.com/blog/ Clinical Psychologist Wed, 09 Oct 2019 10:30:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 The Think Act Be podcast features conversations about living more fully. Guests from a wide range of backgrounds share their expertise on ways to nourish our minds, bodies, and spirits: What thoughts serve us well? What actions promote well-being? How can we be more fully engaged in our day-to-day lives? Each week we'll explore a different angle on what it means to connect with what we value. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean episodic Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger mail@sethgillihan.com mail@sethgillihan.com (Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger) Conversations on ways to engage more fully in our lives Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence http://sethgillihan.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Copy_of_Think_Act_Be_podcast_(1).png http://sethgillihan.com/blog/ TV-PG Weekly Ep. 61: Dr. Suvrat Bhargave — How to Discover the Truth of Who You Are http://sethgillihan.com/ep-61-dr-suvrat-bhargave-how-to-discover-the-truth-of-who-you-are/ Wed, 09 Oct 2019 10:30:09 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14448 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-61-dr-suvrat-bhargave-how-to-discover-the-truth-of-who-you-are/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-61-dr-suvrat-bhargave-how-to-discover-the-truth-of-who-you-are/feed/ 0 My guest this week is psychiatrist Dr. Suvrat Bhargave, author of the recent book, A Moment of Insight. It was a great conversation about the deep work of psychotherapy, which can even lead to spiritual growth—for both people in the therapy relationship. We explored the challenging and exciting question of figuring out who each of us actually is; how healing can lead to growth; reliable ways to reduce anxiety; challenging the stories we tell ourselves about our lives and ourselves; and recognizing our spirit as a constant source that helps us navigate through our experiences. Please note that Dr. Bhargave discusses the sexual abuse he experienced as a child, so you can decide if this is a conversation you want to listen to at this time. I have great respect for his openness about this painful topic, and I think a lot of people will find it really helpful, whether or not they’ve live through that kind of abuse. Topics we explored together in this episode include: Recognizing the role of mental health treatment in a broader context of wellness How we can find insights in our daily lives How therapists’ personal experiences can inform their clinical work The universality of human feelings How Dr. B’s anxiety as a child helps him understand children’s emotional experiences The imperative of finding hope How to find a stable sense of value as a human being that doesn’t depend on your actions or circumstances The deceptively simple question, “Who are you?” How to have a sense of strength and identify that’s independent of any of our roles What it means to be a Spark of the Divine The abuse that Dr. B experienced as a child, and how his healing began Healing as an ongoing process of expansion How healing can lead to growth Connecting with spirit through focused presence The practice of gratitude The power of the breath in managing anxiety and returning to equilibrium Challenging the stories we tell ourselves about our lives and ourselves Recognizing our spirit as a constant source that helps us navigate through our experiences The excitement of getting to know who you really are Here is the link to Dr. Bhargave's book: A Moment of Insight: Universal Lessons Learned From a Psychiatrist's Couch (A percentage of each sale from this link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Suvrat Bhargave, MD, is a renowned and respected educator, speaker, and board-certified psychiatrist, specializing in child and adolescent psychiatry. He completed his residency training and specialty fellowship at Duke University, and has practiced in hospitals, community health, and private practice settings. Dr. B (as he is lovingly called by his patients) has built a successful practice based on empathy, education, and empowerment. Known for his “relatable expertise”, he is highly sought after to lecture locally and nationally on a broad range of topics pertaining to personal growth, effective parenting, relationship satisfaction, and mental health conditions. In his work as a psychiatrist, Dr. B helps those he works with to make changes and experience fulfillment through gradual but dynamic moments of insight and awareness. Find Dr. Bhargave online at his website, on Instagram, and on Facebook. My guest this week is psychiatrist Dr. Suvrat Bhargave, author of the recent book, A Moment of Insight. It was a great conversation about the deep work of psychotherapy, which can even lead to spiritual growth—for both people in the therapy relationshi... My guest this week is psychiatrist Dr. Suvrat Bhargave, author of the recent book, A Moment of Insight. It was a great conversation about the deep work of psychotherapy, which can even lead to spiritual growth—for both people in the therapy relationship.<br /> <br /> We explored the challenging and exciting question of figuring out who each of us actually is; how healing can lead to growth; reliable ways to reduce anxiety; challenging the stories we tell ourselves about our lives and ourselves; and recognizing our spirit as a constant source that helps us navigate through our experiences.<br /> <br /> Please note that Dr. Bhargave discusses the sexual abuse he experienced as a child, so you can decide if this is a conversation you want to listen to at this time. I have great respect for his openness about this painful topic, and I think a lot of people will find it really helpful, whether or not they’ve live through that kind of abuse.<br /> <br /> Topics we explored together in this episode include:<br /> <br /> Recognizing the role of mental health treatment in a broader context of wellness<br /> How we can find insights in our daily lives<br /> How therapists’ personal experiences can inform their clinical work<br /> The universality of human feelings<br /> How Dr. B’s anxiety as a child helps him understand children’s emotional experiences<br /> The imperative of finding hope<br /> How to find a stable sense of value as a human being that doesn’t depend on your actions or circumstances<br /> The deceptively simple question, “Who are you?”<br /> How to have a sense of strength and identify that’s independent of any of our roles<br /> What it means to be a Spark of the Divine<br /> The abuse that Dr. B experienced as a child, and how his healing began<br /> Healing as an ongoing process of expansion<br /> How healing can lead to growth<br /> Connecting with spirit through focused presence<br /> The practice of gratitude<br /> The power of the breath in managing anxiety and returning to equilibrium<br /> Challenging the stories we tell ourselves about our lives and ourselves<br /> Recognizing our spirit as a constant source that helps us navigate through our experiences<br /> The excitement of getting to know who you really are<br /> <br /> Here is the link to Dr. Bhargave's book:<br /> <br /> A Moment of Insight: Universal Lessons Learned From a Psychiatrist's Couch (A percentage of each sale from this link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Suvrat Bhargave, MD, is a renowned and respected educator, speaker, and board-certified psychiatrist, specializing in child and adolescent psychiatry. He completed his residency training and specialty fellowship at Duke University, and has practiced in hospitals, community health, and private practice settings.<br /> <br /> Dr. B (as he is lovingly called by his patients) has built a successful practice based on empathy, education, and empowerment. Known for his “relatable expertise”, he is highly sought after to lecture locally and nationally on a broad range of topics pertaining to personal growth, effective parenting, relationship satisfaction, and mental health conditions.<br /> <br /> In his work as a psychiatrist, Dr. B helps those he works with to make changes and experience fulfillment through gradual but dynamic moments of insight and awareness.<br /> <br /> Find Dr. Bhargave online at his website, on Instagram, and on Facebook. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:00:55 Ep. 60: Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling — Finding a Love That Can Transform the World http://sethgillihan.com/ep-60-rev-lisa-schubert-nowling-finding-a-love-that-can-transform-the-world/ Wed, 25 Sep 2019 10:30:27 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14436 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-60-rev-lisa-schubert-nowling-finding-a-love-that-can-transform-the-world/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-60-rev-lisa-schubert-nowling-finding-a-love-that-can-transform-the-world/feed/ 0 My guest this week is the Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling, an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church. I learned of Lisa and her work through the Indiana University alumni network, as she and I are both IU grads. In this episode we talk about the life of a pastor, which is very familiar to me since I was a preacher's kid (both of my parents were ordained). We also talked a lot about what it means to have a "calling," and how to find yours. Other topics of discussion included: What led Lisa to become a minister The difference between being religious and being spiritual Listening for the call to one’s vocation The difference between vocation and career The best parts for Lisa of being a pastor What it means to be a follower of Jesus Christ The mission of Lisa’s church and how she understands it Rev. John Wesley’s three simple rules: Do No Harm; Do Good; Stay in Love With God Righting the wrongs of the church toward the marginalized The Jewish concept of Tikkun Olam What it means to be “holy” Singer/songwriter Rich Mullins The love of God as different from our human understanding of love The difference between “heart knowledge” and “head knowledge” of God My own epiphany about the nature of God’s love Reasons for the high burnout rate among pastors The imperative of self-care and honoring the principle of the Sabbath The challenge of attracting young people to the church How to measure the fruitfulness of a church What Christians can learn from other faith traditions How to find one’s vocational calling Parker Palmer's book Let Your Life Speak (affiliate link) How a calling might shift across one’s lifetime The intersection between the spirit within us and the spirit outside of us Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling is Lead Pastor at the First United Methodist Church in Bloomington, IN. She completed her bachelor's degree at Indiana University in Bloomington and continued her education at Duke Divinity School. Lisa has served churches in urban, small-town and campus settings, and is passionate about sharing the love of Jesus with all people through worship, service, generosity, and social advocacy. She and her husband have a three-year-old daughter and enjoy traveling, being outdoors, and cheering on their favorite sports teams, especially the Hoosiers. My guest this week is the Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling, an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church. I learned of Lisa and her work through the Indiana University alumni network, as she and I are both IU grads. My guest this week is the Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling, an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church. I learned of Lisa and her work through the Indiana University alumni network, as she and I are both IU grads. In this episode we talk about the life of a pastor, which is very familiar to me since I was a preacher's kid (both of my parents were ordained).<br /> <br /> We also talked a lot about what it means to have a "calling," and how to find yours. Other topics of discussion included:<br /> <br /> What led Lisa to become a minister<br /> The difference between being religious and being spiritual<br /> Listening for the call to one’s vocation<br /> The difference between vocation and career<br /> The best parts for Lisa of being a pastor<br /> What it means to be a follower of Jesus Christ<br /> The mission of Lisa’s church and how she understands it<br /> Rev. John Wesley’s three simple rules: Do No Harm; Do Good; Stay in Love With God<br /> Righting the wrongs of the church toward the marginalized<br /> The Jewish concept of Tikkun Olam<br /> What it means to be “holy”<br /> Singer/songwriter Rich Mullins<br /> The love of God as different from our human understanding of love<br /> The difference between “heart knowledge” and “head knowledge” of God<br /> My own epiphany about the nature of God’s love<br /> Reasons for the high burnout rate among pastors<br /> The imperative of self-care and honoring the principle of the Sabbath<br /> The challenge of attracting young people to the church<br /> How to measure the fruitfulness of a church<br /> What Christians can learn from other faith traditions<br /> How to find one’s vocational calling<br /> Parker Palmer's book Let Your Life Speak (affiliate link)<br /> How a calling might shift across one’s lifetime<br /> The intersection between the spirit within us and the spirit outside of us<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Rev. Lisa Schubert Nowling is Lead Pastor at the First United Methodist Church in Bloomington, IN. She completed her bachelor's degree at Indiana University in Bloomington and continued her education at Duke Divinity School. Lisa has served churches in urban, small-town and campus settings, and is passionate about sharing the love of Jesus with all people through worship, service, generosity, and social advocacy. She and her husband have a three-year-old daughter and enjoy traveling, being outdoors, and cheering on their favorite sports teams, especially the Hoosiers. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 59:24 Ep. 59: Dr. Aria Campbell-Danesh — How to Connect With What You Love Every Day of the Year http://sethgillihan.com/ep-59-dr-aria-campbell-danesh-how-to-connect-with-what-you-love-every-day-of-the-year/ Tue, 10 Sep 2019 10:30:35 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14412 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-59-dr-aria-campbell-danesh-how-to-connect-with-what-you-love-every-day-of-the-year/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-59-dr-aria-campbell-danesh-how-to-connect-with-what-you-love-every-day-of-the-year/feed/ 0 My guest this week is Dr. Aria Campbell-Danesh, back for a second time (Aria was my very first podcast guest). We’re really pleased to announce the release of the book we wrote together called A Mindful Year, on September 10, 2019 (Blackstone Publishing). In this episode Aria and I explore many of the themes that came up in our year-long collaboration as we wrote back and forth to each other, such as the quality of presence we bring to each moment, how to move through the fear that holds us back, and the value of simplicity. This book has special significance to me because of the close collaboration that Aria and I had and all that we shared during that year. It's also the closest reflection of anything I've written so far of what's most important to me and where I find strength and comfort. The practices we shared with each other, and share now with our readers, were tremendously helpful to me during what ended up being quite a trying year—much more so than I was expecting. In this episode Aria and I explored topics that included: The development of our friendship and the post-wedding day conversation that led to A Mindful Year The importance of the quality we bring to the present moment Mindfulness as a daily awakening The downsides of focusing on the past or the future The tendency to get caught up in our thoughts, and the power in noticing thoughts without following them Seeing through societal assumptions about the “right way to live” The implicit assumption that we need “permission” to live in line with who we truly are The fear that can lead us to become a mere shadow of ourselves The joy that exists in being fully who we are Making peace with time, and letting things take as long as they take Seeing people as whole human beings rather than as objects Sample readings from the book The movie “Free Solo” The value of simplicity Distinguishing between our real needs and the “deceptive whims of what we want.” Here is the affiliate link to buy our book on Amazon (helping to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): A Mindful Year: 365 Ways to Find Connection and the Sacred in Everyday Life The famous Alfie Dog Here's a photo of Alfie, Aria's beloved dog that we talk about in this episode. Aria got Alfie while we were writing A Mindful Year. Aria Campbell-Danesh, DClinPsych, is from Scotland as his accent suggests, and attended St. Andrews University. He did a year of study abroad that brought him to Penn, which is where I met him (he took my class called "Anxiety and the Brain"). After returning to the UK he completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at University College London. Aria is also a certified personal trainer, with extensive training and expertise in mindfulness and meditation. He's a frequently sought after expert in the media, in outlets such as Marie Claire, Top Santé, Women’s Health, and The Sunday Telegraph. He lives in England. Find Aria online at his website, and connect with him on Instagram. My guest this week is Dr. Aria Campbell-Danesh, back for a second time (Aria was my very first podcast guest). We’re really pleased to announce the release of the book we wrote together called A Mindful Year, on September 10, My guest this week is Dr. Aria Campbell-Danesh, back for a second time (Aria was my very first podcast guest). We’re really pleased to announce the release of the book we wrote together called A Mindful Year, on September 10, 2019 (Blackstone Publishing).<br /> <br /> In this episode Aria and I explore many of the themes that came up in our year-long collaboration as we wrote back and forth to each other, such as the quality of presence we bring to each moment, how to move through the fear that holds us back, and the value of simplicity.<br /> <br /> This book has special significance to me because of the close collaboration that Aria and I had and all that we shared during that year. It's also the closest reflection of anything I've written so far of what's most important to me and where I find strength and comfort.<br /> <br /> The practices we shared with each other, and share now with our readers, were tremendously helpful to me during what ended up being quite a trying year—much more so than I was expecting.<br /> <br /> In this episode Aria and I explored topics that included:<br /> <br /> The development of our friendship and the post-wedding day conversation that led to A Mindful Year<br /> The importance of the quality we bring to the present moment<br /> Mindfulness as a daily awakening<br /> The downsides of focusing on the past or the future<br /> The tendency to get caught up in our thoughts, and the power in noticing thoughts without following them<br /> Seeing through societal assumptions about the “right way to live”<br /> The implicit assumption that we need “permission” to live in line with who we truly are<br /> The fear that can lead us to become a mere shadow of ourselves<br /> The joy that exists in being fully who we are<br /> Making peace with time, and letting things take as long as they take<br /> Seeing people as whole human beings rather than as objects<br /> Sample readings from the book<br /> The movie “Free Solo”<br /> The value of simplicity<br /> Distinguishing between our real needs and the “deceptive whims of what we want.”<br /> <br /> Here is the affiliate link to buy our book on Amazon (helping to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> A Mindful Year: 365 Ways to Find Connection and the Sacred in Everyday Life<br /> <br /> The famous Alfie Dog<br /> <br /> Here's a photo of Alfie, Aria's beloved dog that we talk about in this episode. Aria got Alfie while we were writing A Mindful Year.<br /> <br /> Aria Campbell-Danesh, DClinPsych, is from Scotland as his accent suggests, and attended St. Andrews University. He did a year of study abroad that brought him to Penn, which is where I met him (he took my class called "Anxiety and the Brain").<br /> <br /> After returning to the UK he completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at University College London.<br /> <br /> Aria is also a certified personal trainer, with extensive training and expertise in mindfulness and meditation. He's a frequently sought after expert in the media, in outlets such as Marie Claire, Top Santé, Women’s Health, and The Sunday Telegraph. He lives in England.<br /> <br /> Find Aria online at his website, and connect with him on Instagram. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 59:48 Ep. 58: Dr. Rachel Chrastil — How to Have a Life You Love, With or Without Kids http://sethgillihan.com/ep-58-dr-rachel-chrastil-how-to-have-a-life-you-love-with-or-without-kids/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:30:17 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14402 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-58-dr-rachel-chrastil-how-to-have-a-life-you-love-with-or-without-kids/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-58-dr-rachel-chrastil-how-to-have-a-life-you-love-with-or-without-kids/feed/ 0 My guest this week is historian and author Dr. Rachel Chrastil. She recently wrote a book called How to Be Childless: A History and Philosophy of Life Without Children. We discussed the intersection of her professional and personal interest in this topic—Rachel herself has chosen not to have kids—and several of the myths about a life without children. Her perspective is uplifting, as she emphasizes the joy in living that is available to all, regardless of parenthood status, and the symbiosis that exists between those who do and those who don't have kids. Topics we touched on in this episode included: How common childlessness is (about 15% in the US for women 45 and older) How Rachel’s voluntary childlessness affected her decision to write this book The difficulty in clearly distinguishing between voluntary and involuntary childlessness Why being childless has gotten a bad rap, while having a kids is seen as wholesome and virtuous The gravity that many people feel from being the final link in the chain of life that led to them The frequent accusation that women who choose to be childless are “selfish” The difficulty in talking about one’s decision not to have kids Challenges related to the fear of regret around childlessness Research on the association between happiness and parenthood Making the most of our choices rather than making perfect choices What Rachel loves about her life The prospects in old age for parents versus the childless The interdependence between parents and the childless Her book is available on Amazon: How to Be Childless (affiliate link). Rachel Chrastil, PhD, author of How to Be Childless, is a historian of modern Europe, an award-winning teacher, and a Fulbright Scholar. Her first two books, Organizing for War: France 1870-1914 and The Siege of Strasbourg, examine civilian dilemmas in the face of war. She lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she is Professor of History and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at Xavier University. Find Rachel online at her website and follow her on Twitter. My guest this week is historian and author Dr. Rachel Chrastil. She recently wrote a book called How to Be Childless: A History and Philosophy of Life Without Children. We discussed the intersection of her professional and personal interest in this top... My guest this week is historian and author Dr. Rachel Chrastil. She recently wrote a book called How to Be Childless: A History and Philosophy of Life Without Children. We discussed the intersection of her professional and personal interest in this topic—Rachel herself has chosen not to have kids—and several of the myths about a life without children. Her perspective is uplifting, as she emphasizes the joy in living that is available to all, regardless of parenthood status, and the symbiosis that exists between those who do and those who don't have kids.<br /> <br /> Topics we touched on in this episode included:<br /> <br /> How common childlessness is (about 15% in the US for women 45 and older)<br /> How Rachel’s voluntary childlessness affected her decision to write this book<br /> The difficulty in clearly distinguishing between voluntary and involuntary childlessness<br /> Why being childless has gotten a bad rap, while having a kids is seen as wholesome and virtuous<br /> The gravity that many people feel from being the final link in the chain of life that led to them<br /> The frequent accusation that women who choose to be childless are “selfish”<br /> The difficulty in talking about one’s decision not to have kids<br /> Challenges related to the fear of regret around childlessness<br /> Research on the association between happiness and parenthood<br /> Making the most of our choices rather than making perfect choices<br /> What Rachel loves about her life<br /> The prospects in old age for parents versus the childless<br /> The interdependence between parents and the childless<br /> <br /> Her book is available on Amazon: How to Be Childless (affiliate link).<br /> <br /> Rachel Chrastil, PhD, author of How to Be Childless, is a historian of modern Europe, an award-winning teacher, and a Fulbright Scholar. <br /> <br /> Her first two books, Organizing for War: France 1870-1914 and The Siege of Strasbourg, examine civilian dilemmas in the face of war. <br /> <br /> She lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she is Professor of History and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at Xavier University.<br /> <br /> Find Rachel online at her website and follow her on Twitter. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 50:17 Ep. 57: Laurie Warren — How to Develop Reverence for the Incredible Gift of Life http://sethgillihan.com/ep-57-laurie-warren-how-to-develop-reverence-for-the-incredible-gift-of-life/ Wed, 28 Aug 2019 10:30:29 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14393 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-57-laurie-warren-how-to-develop-reverence-for-the-incredible-gift-of-life/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-57-laurie-warren-how-to-develop-reverence-for-the-incredible-gift-of-life/feed/ 0 My guest this week is author and change agent Laurie Warren. We discussed her forthcoming book Wild World, Joyful Heart (Oct. 8, 2019) and her approach to empowered well-being. Along the way we explored how body, mind, and spirit are interconnected, and how we can take back responsibility for our own health and well-being. Laurie emphasizes that joy (which is different from "happiness") is always available, no matter what's happening in our lives. Other topics we got into included: The distinction between brain and mind How to get started on the path toward health and joy The profound changes that are possible from cleaning up our diets Recognizing the power of our unconscious habits and belief systems Eating to build our bodies rather than to fill our bellies The difference between happiness, which depends on outside circumstances, and joy, which is an attitude The growth that often comes from living through challenges The daily stress we stop noticing because we experience it so often The value of choosing not to be bombarded continually by bad news The breathtaking acceleration in technological development over the past few decades How to stop being victims and start being creators of our lives Releasing the belief in healing as an endpoint The delay between damaging our bodies and feeling any symptoms What whole person care includes: tending our bodies training our minds finding full expression for our spirits The strengths and limitations of our healthcare system and mainstream medicine Taking small steps to care for your whole organism Learn more about Laurie's book and sign up to be notified when it releases on her website book page. Laurie Warren, MSN, is a change agent for empowered well-being in body, mind, and spirit. She works as a corporate consultant, wellness clinician, and sought-after speaker, and is the author of the forthcoming book Wild World, Joyful Heart: Unlock Your Power to Create Health and Joy. Laurie holds a master's degree in clinical and integrative nutrition, with additional training in biochemistry, functional medicine, psychology, and herbalism. Her approach to health, healing, and joy is grounded in three foundational beliefs: The body is a self-organizing organism that’s hard-wired for healing. Our mind can be used as either a bridge or a barrier in our quest for well-being. What matters most is who we are as we move through this world. Laurie is also a regularly featured expert in the media. A Maine native, she lives in the Greater Boston area and enjoys her four children, her two grandchildren, and the gift of life. To learn more about Laurie and her work, visit her website and connect with her on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. My guest this week is author and change agent Laurie Warren. We discussed her forthcoming book Wild World, Joyful Heart (Oct. 8, 2019) and her approach to empowered well-being. Along the way we explored how body, mind, and spirit are interconnected, My guest this week is author and change agent Laurie Warren. We discussed her forthcoming book Wild World, Joyful Heart (Oct. 8, 2019) and her approach to empowered well-being. Along the way we explored how body, mind, and spirit are interconnected, and how we can take back responsibility for our own health and well-being. Laurie emphasizes that joy (which is different from "happiness") is always available, no matter what's happening in our lives.<br /> <br /> Other topics we got into included:<br /> <br /> The distinction between brain and mind<br /> How to get started on the path toward health and joy<br /> The profound changes that are possible from cleaning up our diets<br /> Recognizing the power of our unconscious habits and belief systems<br /> Eating to build our bodies rather than to fill our bellies<br /> The difference between happiness, which depends on outside circumstances, and joy, which is an attitude<br /> The growth that often comes from living through challenges<br /> The daily stress we stop noticing because we experience it so often<br /> The value of choosing not to be bombarded continually by bad news<br /> The breathtaking acceleration in technological development over the past few decades<br /> How to stop being victims and start being creators of our lives<br /> Releasing the belief in healing as an endpoint<br /> The delay between damaging our bodies and feeling any symptoms<br /> What whole person care includes:<br /> <br /> tending our bodies<br /> training our minds<br /> finding full expression for our spirits<br /> <br /> <br /> The strengths and limitations of our healthcare system and mainstream medicine<br /> Taking small steps to care for your whole organism<br /> <br /> Learn more about Laurie's book and sign up to be notified when it releases on her website book page.<br /> <br /> Laurie Warren, MSN, is a change agent for empowered well-being in body, mind, and spirit. She works as a corporate consultant, wellness clinician, and sought-after speaker, and is the author of the forthcoming book Wild World, Joyful Heart: Unlock Your Power to Create Health and Joy.<br /> <br /> Laurie holds a master's degree in clinical and integrative nutrition, with additional training in biochemistry, functional medicine, psychology, and herbalism. Her approach to health, healing, and joy is grounded in three foundational beliefs:<br /> <br /> The body is a self-organizing organism that’s hard-wired for healing.<br /> Our mind can be used as either a bridge or a barrier in our quest for well-being.<br /> What matters most is who we are as we move through this world.<br /> <br /> Laurie is also a regularly featured expert in the media. A Maine native, she lives in the Greater Boston area and enjoys her four children, her two grandchildren, and the gift of life.<br /> <br /> To learn more about Laurie and her work, visit her website and connect with her on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:10:46 Ep. 56: Dr. Raymond Moody — Is the End of Life Just the Beginning? http://sethgillihan.com/ep-56-dr-raymond-moody-is-the-end-of-life-just-the-beginning/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 10:30:54 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14382 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-56-dr-raymond-moody-is-the-end-of-life-just-the-beginning/#comments http://sethgillihan.com/ep-56-dr-raymond-moody-is-the-end-of-life-just-the-beginning/feed/ 2 My guest this week is Dr. Raymond Moody, who brought the phenomenon of near-death experiences (NDEs) into the mainstream with his landmark 1975 book, Life After Life. In this episode we explored how the field of NDE studies has evolved in the past four decades, and discussed some of his latest thoughts about the boundary between this world and whatever is beyond. It was a fascinating conversation about the biggest questions facing each of us. Topics we touched on included: What has changed in the NDE world since Life After Life was published 44 years ago The phenomenon of a shared death experience (see this discussion with Sharon Prentice about her own SDE) The difficulty in explaining away NDEs as simple biological mechanisms within the body and brain The study of unintelligibility and a typology of nonsense Research on how common NDEs are (and why it matters how you ask participants about them) The impossibility of speaking sensibly about dimensions beyond our three spatial dimensions The popularity of nonsense in songs and books, as well as in religious experience The difficulty in putting some dreams into meaningful words The life review that is often part of an NDE Life as an opportunity to learn to love Encountering a Being of complete compassion and love, experienced as a light Finding all-encompassing love and compassion in this life Implications of NDEs for how we live this life How an NDE is more like waking up than having a dream Raymond's introduction to NDEs by George Ritchie's description of his own NDE How the study of NDEs shaped Raymond's life The lack of a clear, sharp boundary between this world and the next Memory as the central element of human identity Death as “stepping out of character” and leaving behind the role we’ve played Here are links to some of Raymond's book (affiliate links): Life After Life Glimpses of Eternity: Sharing a Loved One's Passage from This Life to the Next Life After Loss: Conquering Grief and Finding Hope Making Sense of Nonsense: The Logical Bridge Between Science and Religion (Jan. 2020) Raymond Moody, Jr., MD, PhD, completed his bachelor's degree with honors in philosophy from the University of Virginia and went on to earn a PhD in philosophy from UVA as well as an MD from the Medical College of Georgia. He is a bestselling author of twelve books, which have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has also authored numerous academic and professional articles on near-death experiences and the relationship of language to consciousness. Dr. Moody continues to draw enormous public interest with his ground-breaking works on the near-death experience and other transpersonal aspects of grief and the dying process. Raymond received the World Humanitarian Award in Denmark and was honored with a bronze medal in the Human Relations category at the New York Film Festival for the movie version of Life After Life. He offers a variety of lecture/workshop presentations on the topics of near-death experiences, death with dignity, life after loss, surviving grief and finding hope, visionary encounters with departed loved ones, the healing power of humor, the loss of children, language and consciousness, and catastrophic tragedy causing collective grief. Raymond trains hospice workers, clergy, psychologists, nurses, doctors, and other medical professionals on matters of grief recovery and dying. He is a featured expert in the media and has appeared on hundreds of local and nationally syndicated programs such as MSNBC’s Grief Recovery, NBC Today, ABC’s Turning Point, Oprah, and other popular talk shows on television and radio. Find Raymond online at his website. My guest this week is Dr. Raymond Moody, who brought the phenomenon of near-death experiences (NDEs) into the mainstream with his landmark 1975 book, Life After Life. In this episode we explored how the field of NDE studies has evolved in the past four... My guest this week is Dr. Raymond Moody, who brought the phenomenon of near-death experiences (NDEs) into the mainstream with his landmark 1975 book, Life After Life. In this episode we explored how the field of NDE studies has evolved in the past four decades, and discussed some of his latest thoughts about the boundary between this world and whatever is beyond. It was a fascinating conversation about the biggest questions facing each of us.<br /> <br /> <br /> Topics we touched on included:<br /> <br /> <br /> What has changed in the NDE world since Life After Life was published 44 years ago<br /> The phenomenon of a shared death experience (see this discussion with Sharon Prentice about her own SDE)<br /> The difficulty in explaining away NDEs as simple biological mechanisms within the body and brain<br /> The study of unintelligibility and a typology of nonsense<br /> Research on how common NDEs are (and why it matters how you ask participants about them)<br /> The impossibility of speaking sensibly about dimensions beyond our three spatial dimensions<br /> The popularity of nonsense in songs and books, as well as in religious experience<br /> The difficulty in putting some dreams into meaningful words<br /> The life review that is often part of an NDE<br /> Life as an opportunity to learn to love<br /> Encountering a Being of complete compassion and love, experienced as a light<br /> Finding all-encompassing love and compassion in this life<br /> Implications of NDEs for how we live this life<br /> How an NDE is more like waking up than having a dream<br /> Raymond's introduction to NDEs by George Ritchie's description of his own NDE<br /> How the study of NDEs shaped Raymond's life<br /> The lack of a clear, sharp boundary between this world and the next<br /> Memory as the central element of human identity<br /> Death as “stepping out of character” and leaving behind the role we’ve played<br /> <br /> Here are links to some of Raymond's book (affiliate links):<br /> <br /> Life After Life<br /> Glimpses of Eternity: Sharing a Loved One's Passage from This Life to the Next<br /> Life After Loss: Conquering Grief and Finding Hope<br /> Making Sense of Nonsense: The Logical Bridge Between Science and Religion (Jan. 2020)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Raymond Moody, Jr., MD, PhD, completed his bachelor's degree with honors in philosophy from the University of Virginia and went on to earn a PhD in philosophy from UVA as well as an MD from the Medical College of Georgia.<br /> <br /> He is a bestselling author of twelve books, which have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has also authored numerous academic and professional articles on near-death experiences and the relationship of language to consciousness. Dr. Moody continues to draw enormous public interest with his ground-breaking works on the near-death experience and other transpersonal aspects of grief and the dying process.<br /> <br /> Raymond received the World Humanitarian Award in Denmark and was honored with a bronze medal in the Human Relations category at the New York Film Festival for the movie version of Life After Life.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> He offers a variety of lecture/workshop presentations on the topics of near-death experiences, death with dignity, life after loss, surviving grief and finding hope, visionary encounters with departed loved ones, the healing power of humor, the loss of children, language and consciousness, and catastrophic tragedy causing collective grief.<br /> <br /> Raymond trains hospice workers, clergy, psychologists, nurses, doctors, and other medical professionals on matters of grief recovery and dying. He is a featured expert in the media and has appeared on hundreds of local and nationally syndicated programs such as MSNBC’s Grief Recovery, NBC Today, ABC’s Turning Point, Oprah, Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:05:43 Ep. 55: Dr. Yonder Gillihan — What Is There to Love About the Bible? http://sethgillihan.com/ep-55-dr-yonder-gillihan-what-is-there-to-love-about-the-bible/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 10:30:19 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14367 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-55-dr-yonder-gillihan-what-is-there-to-love-about-the-bible/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-55-dr-yonder-gillihan-what-is-there-to-love-about-the-bible/feed/ 0 My guest this week is Dr. Yonder Gillihan, a professor of Theology with special expertise in the Dead Seas Scrolls. He's also my older brother, so our discussion included some of our personal history with religion and the Bible. You'll hear how Yonder's relationship with the Bible has changed over the past four decades, and how he not only made peace with the Bible but even made friends with it. Some of the topics we get into include: The place of the Bible in my brother's and my early family life Why young people often find the Bible to be a tedious and irrelevant book Common frustrations that push people away from the Bible Classical studies as a slippery slope into Biblical studies Different questions we can bring to religious texts Using the Bible to understand its authors The irreconcilable contradictions in the Bible (e.g., the two creation accounts in Genesis) Why the Bible has endured for thousands of years Tradeoffs among some of the popular Bible translations, and the value in reading from multiple translations The Bible as a mosaic of conversations among people who don’t always have the same ideas Understanding the person of Jesus Christ as presented in the four gospels The extent to which the Bible reveals an all-encompassing and unconditional love The many perspectives that the Bible embraces and affirms Conflicting accounts of Jesus’s resurrection in Mark vs. Matthew Biblical inconsistencies as a reminder of the messiness of human life Here are the translations we discussed (affiliate links): Jewish Study Bible New International Version Study Bible (the translation I grew up with) New Revised Standard Version The New Jerusalem Bible The John Prine song Yonder mentioned is called "Fish and Whistle." Here's more about the scholar Terry Eagleton. Yonder Gillihan, PhD, completed his bachelor's and master's degrees at Ball State University and his doctorate at the University of Chicago. He has taught at Yale Divinity School and Dartmouth College, and currently is an associate professor in the Theology Department at Boston College. Yonder's research interests include the Dead Sea Scrolls, Matthew and Paul, apocalypticism, and Christian origins within the context of Jewish sectarianism in the late Second Temple period. His research methods include the application of modern social-scientific methods to ancient communities, with emphasis on the relationship between voluntary associations, and local and imperial authorities. Yonder is heavily invested in teaching his students to read and appreciate the Bible, as I'm guessing you'll gather from our discussion. Find Yonder online at his faculty page on the Boston College website. My guest this week is Dr. Yonder Gillihan, a professor of Theology with special expertise in the Dead Seas Scrolls. He's also my older brother, so our discussion included some of our personal history with religion and the Bible. My guest this week is Dr. Yonder Gillihan, a professor of Theology with special expertise in the Dead Seas Scrolls. He's also my older brother, so our discussion included some of our personal history with religion and the Bible. You'll hear how Yonder's relationship with the Bible has changed over the past four decades, and how he not only made peace with the Bible but even made friends with it.<br /> <br /> Some of the topics we get into include:<br /> <br /> The place of the Bible in my brother's and my early family life<br /> Why young people often find the Bible to be a tedious and irrelevant book<br /> Common frustrations that push people away from the Bible<br /> Classical studies as a slippery slope into Biblical studies<br /> Different questions we can bring to religious texts<br /> Using the Bible to understand its authors<br /> The irreconcilable contradictions in the Bible (e.g., the two creation accounts in Genesis)<br /> Why the Bible has endured for thousands of years<br /> Tradeoffs among some of the popular Bible translations, and the value in reading from multiple translations<br /> The Bible as a mosaic of conversations among people who don’t always have the same ideas<br /> Understanding the person of Jesus Christ as presented in the four gospels<br /> The extent to which the Bible reveals an all-encompassing and unconditional love<br /> The many perspectives that the Bible embraces and affirms<br /> Conflicting accounts of Jesus’s resurrection in Mark vs. Matthew<br /> Biblical inconsistencies as a reminder of the messiness of human life<br /> <br /> Here are the translations we discussed (affiliate links):<br /> <br /> Jewish Study Bible<br /> New International Version Study Bible (the translation I grew up with)<br /> New Revised Standard Version<br /> The New Jerusalem Bible<br /> <br /> The John Prine song Yonder mentioned is called "Fish and Whistle."<br /> <br /> Here's more about the scholar Terry Eagleton.<br /> <br /> Yonder Gillihan, PhD, completed his bachelor's and master's degrees at Ball State University and his doctorate at the University of Chicago.<br /> <br /> He has taught at Yale Divinity School and Dartmouth College, and currently is an associate professor in the Theology Department at Boston College. Yonder's research interests include the Dead Sea Scrolls, Matthew and Paul, apocalypticism, and Christian origins within the context of Jewish sectarianism in the late Second Temple period. <br /> <br /> His research methods include the application of modern social-scientific methods to ancient communities, with emphasis on the relationship between voluntary associations, and local and imperial authorities.<br /> <br /> Yonder is heavily invested in teaching his students to read and appreciate the Bible, as I'm guessing you'll gather from our discussion.<br /> <br /> Find Yonder online at his faculty page on the Boston College website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:10:27 Ep. 54: Dr. Eben Alexander — Exploring Consciousness, Heaven, and Unconditional Love http://sethgillihan.com/ep-54-dr-eben-alexander-exploring-consciousness-heaven-and-unconditional-love/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 10:30:27 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14358 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-54-dr-eben-alexander-exploring-consciousness-heaven-and-unconditional-love/#comments http://sethgillihan.com/ep-54-dr-eben-alexander-exploring-consciousness-heaven-and-unconditional-love/feed/ 5 My guest this week is Dr. Eben Alexander, a neurosurgeon who had a near-death experience (NDE) about a decade ago. You may be familiar with Eben's story from his New York Times number one bestselling book, Proof of Heaven.  I found this to be a surprising and thought-provoking discussion about some rather controversial ideas—for example, that memories aren't actually stored in the brain! We discuss his most recent book, Living in a Mindful Universe, which grew from his NDE. Ideas we explored together included: The illness and coma that led up to Eben’s NDE, and the main elements of it The shock of having an NDE after believing in a strictly material view of the universe The relation between formalized religion and the divine presence Eben experienced in his NDE How science undermined Eben’s sense of spirituality The connection between scientific materialism and the denial of free will The importance of quantum physics for the mind-brain question and the study of consciousness The possibility that our brains limit consciousness rather than create it The durability of NDE experiences Cultivating a deeper relationship with consciousness through meditation The shocking proposal that human memories are not stored in the brain The relation between reincarnation and theories of human memory storage Other forms of nonlocal consciousness The proposition that consciousness is fundamental to existence, and inexplicable in purely materialist terms How common NDEs are, yet how rarely they’re talked about Death as liberation of consciousness, rather than a diminution Comparisons among different ways of altering consciousness (meditation, binaural beats, psychedelic drugs) The role of personal experience in shaping our views about consciousness and the afterlife Eben discussed the role of binaural beats in fostering certain wave patterns in the brain and their associated modes of consciousness. Here are links to some of the key people in the history of binaural beats: Heinrich Wilhelm Dove; Robert Monroe. If you're interested in trying a free binaural beats recording, visit Sacred Acoustics. The statistician who led the review of remote viewing was Jessica Utts.  Here's the link to the free 33-Day Journey into the Heart of Consciousness that Eben talked about; he also mentioned the book Dark Night, Early Dawn by Christopher M. Bache (affiliate link). Eben suggested that interested listeners check out the University of Virginia School of Medicine's Division of Perceptual Studies. From the website: "The DOPS is exclusively devoted to the investigation of phenomena that challenge mainstream scientific paradigms regarding the nature of the mind/brain relationship. The researchers at DOPS are particularly interested in studying phenomena related to consciousness clearly functioning beyond the confines of the physical body, as well as phenomena that are directly suggestive of post-mortem survival of consciousness." Click this link for more about N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a psychedelic associated with intense spiritual experiences. It's the active ingredient in ayahuasca. Here are links to Eben's three books (affiliate links): Proof of Heaven (New York Times #1 bestseller) The Map of Heaven  Living in a Mindful Universe (co-written with Karen Newell) Eben Alexander, MD, completed his medical degree at Duke University, and went on to perform over 4000 neurosurgical operations. He was an academic neurosurgeon for over 25 years, including 15 years at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He has a passionate interest in physics and cosmology, which you can tell from our discussion. Eben has been a guest on Dr. Oz, Oprah, and many other media programs. He encourages people to be inspired by the power of unconditional love in their daily lives, in their work, and in their communities. My guest this week is Dr. Eben Alexander, a neurosurgeon who had a near-death experience (NDE) about a decade ago. You may be familiar with Eben's story from his New York Times number one bestselling book, Proof of Heaven.  - My guest this week is Dr. Eben Alexander, a neurosurgeon who had a near-death experience (NDE) about a decade ago. You may be familiar with Eben's story from his New York Times number one bestselling book, Proof of Heaven. <br /> <br /> I found this to be a surprising and thought-provoking discussion about some rather controversial ideas—for example, that memories aren't actually stored in the brain! We discuss his most recent book, Living in a Mindful Universe, which grew from his NDE. Ideas we explored together included:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The illness and coma that led up to Eben’s NDE, and the main elements of it<br /> The shock of having an NDE after believing in a strictly material view of the universe<br /> The relation between formalized religion and the divine presence Eben experienced in his NDE<br /> How science undermined Eben’s sense of spirituality<br /> The connection between scientific materialism and the denial of free will<br /> The importance of quantum physics for the mind-brain question and the study of consciousness<br /> The possibility that our brains limit consciousness rather than create it<br /> The durability of NDE experiences<br /> Cultivating a deeper relationship with consciousness through meditation<br /> The shocking proposal that human memories are not stored in the brain<br /> The relation between reincarnation and theories of human memory storage<br /> Other forms of nonlocal consciousness<br /> The proposition that consciousness is fundamental to existence, and inexplicable in purely materialist terms<br /> How common NDEs are, yet how rarely they’re talked about<br /> Death as liberation of consciousness, rather than a diminution<br /> Comparisons among different ways of altering consciousness (meditation, binaural beats, psychedelic drugs)<br /> The role of personal experience in shaping our views about consciousness and the afterlife<br /> <br /> Eben discussed the role of binaural beats in fostering certain wave patterns in the brain and their associated modes of consciousness. Here are links to some of the key people in the history of binaural beats: Heinrich Wilhelm Dove; Robert Monroe. If you're interested in trying a free binaural beats recording, visit Sacred Acoustics.<br /> <br /> The statistician who led the review of remote viewing was Jessica Utts. <br /> <br /> Here's the link to the free 33-Day Journey into the Heart of Consciousness that Eben talked about; he also mentioned the book Dark Night, Early Dawn by Christopher M. Bache (affiliate link).<br /> <br /> Eben suggested that interested listeners check out the University of Virginia School of Medicine's Division of Perceptual Studies. From the website: "The DOPS is exclusively devoted to the investigation of phenomena that challenge mainstream scientific paradigms regarding the nature of the mind/brain relationship. The researchers at DOPS are particularly interested in studying phenomena related to consciousness clearly functioning beyond the confines of the physical body, as well as phenomena that are directly suggestive of post-mortem survival of consciousness."<br /> <br /> Click this link for more about N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a psychedelic associated with intense spiritual experiences. It's the active ingredient in ayahuasca.<br /> <br /> Here are links to Eben's three books (affiliate links):<br /> <br /> Proof of Heaven (New York Times #1 bestseller)<br /> The Map of Heaven  <br /> Living in a Mindful Universe (co-written with Karen Newell)<br /> <br /> Eben Alexander, MD, completed his medical degree at Duke University, and went on to perform over 4000 neurosurgical operations. He was an academic neurosurgeon for over 25 years, including 15 years at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He has a passionate interest in physics and cosmology, Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 57:14 Ep. 53: Doug Holt — How to Take Responsibility for Living Your Dreams http://sethgillihan.com/ep-53-doug-holt-how-to-take-responsibility-for-living-your-dreams/ Wed, 31 Jul 2019 10:30:32 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14342 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-53-doug-holt-how-to-take-responsibility-for-living-your-dreams/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-53-doug-holt-how-to-take-responsibility-for-living-your-dreams/feed/ 0 My guest this week is Doug Holt, who is best described as a holistic executive coach. Doug specializes in helping people move toward their most important life goals. We discussed Doug’s philosophy on life and coaching, and the intimate connection between the different parts of our lives, like who we are as people and the work we do. We explored ideas that overlap a lot with my line of work, such as how we identify and change our self-limiting beliefs. I found this to be a very uplifting conversation, and I hope you find the same. Topics we explored included: Being a coach of coaches The value of working holistically as a coach The interconnections among the various parts of our lives The inextricable link between business development and personal development How we define the meaning of life The central importance of relationships How our calendars reveal our priorities The distinction between a business operator and a business owner Common barriers that get in the way of reaching our dreams Noticing patterns in language that reveal underlying beliefs How to identify what we really want How to work on negative self-talk and the value of awareness The box breathing technique to promote presence How to make the time for a career move The value of tracking how we use our time Taking extreme responsibility for our choices Replacing “but” with “and” The power of visualization to chart one’s course (see The90DayGame.com) When a career change is not the right move Here's the book by Wayne Dyer that Doug mentioned, which was recommended to him by a trusted mentor: The Power of Intention (affiliate link). Doug co-hosts The Powerful Man podcast with Tim Matthews, which they recommend for men or anyone who has men in their life. Doug Holt owns multiple companies, all of which focus on helping business owners grow their businesses and design the life they want to live. His passion is helping business owners get unstuck and gain clarity so they can live the lives they truly dream of. Doug's coaching is designed to help individuals take control of their businesses in a way that supports their dreams. Find Doug online at his website. My guest this week is Doug Holt, who is best described as a holistic executive coach. Doug specializes in helping people move toward their most important life goals. We discussed Doug’s philosophy on life and coaching, My guest this week is Doug Holt, who is best described as a holistic executive coach. Doug specializes in helping people move toward their most important life goals. We discussed Doug’s philosophy on life and coaching, and the intimate connection between the different parts of our lives, like who we are as people and the work we do. We explored ideas that overlap a lot with my line of work, such as how we identify and change our self-limiting beliefs.<br /> <br /> I found this to be a very uplifting conversation, and I hope you find the same. Topics we explored included:<br /> <br /> Being a coach of coaches<br /> The value of working holistically as a coach<br /> The interconnections among the various parts of our lives<br /> The inextricable link between business development and personal development<br /> How we define the meaning of life<br /> The central importance of relationships<br /> How our calendars reveal our priorities<br /> The distinction between a business operator and a business owner<br /> Common barriers that get in the way of reaching our dreams<br /> Noticing patterns in language that reveal underlying beliefs<br /> How to identify what we really want<br /> How to work on negative self-talk and the value of awareness<br /> The box breathing technique to promote presence<br /> How to make the time for a career move<br /> The value of tracking how we use our time<br /> Taking extreme responsibility for our choices<br /> Replacing “but” with “and”<br /> The power of visualization to chart one’s course (see The90DayGame.com)<br /> When a career change is not the right move<br /> <br /> Here's the book by Wayne Dyer that Doug mentioned, which was recommended to him by a trusted mentor: The Power of Intention (affiliate link).<br /> <br /> Doug co-hosts The Powerful Man podcast with Tim Matthews, which they recommend for men or anyone who has men in their life.<br /> <br /> Doug Holt owns multiple companies, all of which focus on helping business owners grow their businesses and design the life they want to live.<br /> <br /> His passion is helping business owners get unstuck and gain clarity so they can live the lives they truly dream of.<br /> <br /> Doug's coaching is designed to help individuals take control of their businesses in a way that supports their dreams.<br /> <br /> Find Doug online at his website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 40:19 Ep. 52: Lisa Smartt — How to Listen to Loved Ones at the End of Life http://sethgillihan.com/ep-52-lisa-smartt-how-to-listen-to-loved-ones-at-the-end-of-life/ Wed, 24 Jul 2019 10:30:51 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14330 http://sethgillihan.com/ep-52-lisa-smartt-how-to-listen-to-loved-ones-at-the-end-of-life/#respond http://sethgillihan.com/ep-52-lisa-smartt-how-to-listen-to-loved-ones-at-the-end-of-life/feed/ 0 My guest this week is Lisa Smartt, whose recent book, Words at the Threshold, examines what those who are dying say as they approach the end of life. This is a really important topic, as Lisa reveals that the dying are often communicating much more to us than we might realize. By paying attention in the ways she recommends, their final words in this life become more comprehensible. Topics we explored together included: How language reveals one's mental processes Lisa’s father’s experience that piqued her interest in final words The common occurrence of a person announcing a “big event” as they near their death The value of writing down what our loved ones say toward the end of their life Common metaphors, constructions, and premonitions that show up in final words Synchronicities at the threshold of death that can guide us to better living The appearance of "takeaway figures" in the language of the dying (describing the deceased at their bedside) Ways that those who are dying try to signal to loved ones that their death is nearing The emergence of “terminal lucidity” near the end of life Nonverbal communication with those who are dying Being open to the mysterious The existence of something accessible that is beyond us (or beside us) What those who are dying need from us as we sit with them The wisdom the dying have to offer Lisa's book is available here (a percentage of sales made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Words at the Threshold: What We Say as We're Nearing Death You can find a free chapter of her book on the Final Words Project website. Lisa Smartt, MA, is a linguist and educator. She founded the Final Words Project, an ongoing study devoted to gathering and interpreting the mysterious language at the end of life. Lisa has co-facilitated presentations with Dr. Raymond Moody at universities, hospices, and conferences about language and consciousness; they recently founded the online educational platform, The University of Heaven. Her work has been featured  in The Atlantic, GAIA TV, Coast to Coast AM Radio, and dozens of other media platforms. Lisa recently published Cante Bardo, a novel about a flamenco singer, and Veil, a book of poems inspired by her father. Connect with Lisa online at the Final Words Project website and by email. My guest this week is Lisa Smartt, whose recent book, Words at the Threshold, examines what those who are dying say as they approach the end of life. This is a really important topic, as Lisa reveals that the dying are often communicating much more to ... My guest this week is Lisa Smartt, whose recent book, Words at the Threshold, examines what those who are dying say as they approach the end of life. This is a really important topic, as Lisa reveals that the dying are often communicating much more to us than we might realize. By paying attention in the ways she recommends, their final words in this life become more comprehensible.<br /> <br /> Topics we explored together included:<br /> <br /> How language reveals one's mental processes<br /> Lisa’s father’s experience that piqued her interest in final words<br /> The common occurrence of a person announcing a “big event” as they near their death<br /> The value of writing down what our loved ones say toward the end of their life<br /> Common metaphors, constructions, and premonitions that show up in final words<br /> Synchronicities at the threshold of death that can guide us to better living<br /> The appearance of "takeaway figures" in the language of the dying (describing the deceased at their bedside)<br /> Ways that those who are dying try to signal to loved ones that their death is nearing<br /> The emergence of “terminal lucidity” near the end of life<br /> Nonverbal communication with those who are dying<br /> Being open to the mysterious<br /> The existence of something accessible that is beyond us (or beside us)<br /> What those who are dying need from us as we sit with them<br /> The wisdom the dying have to offer<br /> <br /> Lisa's book is available here (a percentage of sales made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Words at the Threshold: What We Say as We're Nearing Death<br /> <br /> You can find a free chapter of her book on the Final Words Project website.<br /> <br /> Lisa Smartt, MA, is a linguist and educator. She founded the Final Words Project, an ongoing study devoted to gathering and interpreting the mysterious language at the end of life.<br /> <br /> Lisa has co-facilitated presentations with Dr. Raymond Moody at universities, hospices, and conferences about language and consciousness; they recently founded the online educational platform, The University of Heaven. Her work has been featured  in The Atlantic, GAIA TV, Coast to Coast AM Radio, and dozens of other media platforms.<br /> <br /> Lisa recently published Cante Bardo, a novel about a flamenco singer, and Veil, a book of poems inspired by her father.<br /> <br /> Connect with Lisa online at the Final Words Project website and by email. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 45:54 Ep. 51: Dr. William Ferraiolo — How to Train Your Mind Like the Stoics http://sethgillihan.com/ep-51-dr-william-ferraiolo-how-to-train-your-mind-like-the-stoics/ Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:30:04 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14309 My guest this week is Dr. William (Bill) Ferraiolo. We’ll be going all the way back to the roots of cognitive behavioral therapy in this episode—back to the Stoics of ancient Greece and Rome—as we discuss Bill's book, Meditations on Self-Discipline and Failure: Stoic Exercise for Mental Fitness. The big idea of Stoicism is that we don’t have to let external events and our unruly minds determine our well-being. Instead, we can save our energy for training our thoughts and actions to serve us well (sounds like CBT!). Bill is passionate about these ideas and explains how they can make a major difference in our lives when we put them into practice—just as he discovered for himself. Topics we explore together include: The main tenets of Greco-Roman Stoicism The concept of eudaemonia as flourishing and leading a well-lived life The distinctions between Stoicism and common self-help philosophies The value at times of receiving a “kick in the butt” to return to our intentions The relations between Cynic and Stoic philosophy The overlap between CBT and Stoicism The imperative of self-knowledge and self-honesty The amazing durability of the Stoic ideas and ideals The futility of obsessing over things we can’t control The power of the limbic system to override our reason and our efforts toward equanimity The importance of frequent reminders of our best intentions The possibility of taking others’ opinions of us less seriously Why we place so much value on the thoughts in others’ heads The power of focusing our attention and energy on what is in our direct control Times when Stoicism seems to gain greater popularity and traction What it takes to move from insight to transformation The place of physical training, courage, and toughness in Stoicism How Stoicism has helped my guest through anxiety and depression The cultural resurgence of Stoicism Check out this link for more information on Marcus Aurelius, and this one for Epictetus.  I asked Bill for recommendation for modern-day Stoics; he recommended these writers (purchases made through these affiliate links will help to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): William Irvine—A Guide to the Good Life John Sellers—The Art of Living Donald Robertson—The Philosophy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Massimo Pigliucci—How to Be a Stoic Ryan Holliday and Steven Hanselman—The Daily Stoic A.A. Long—Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life Tim Ferriss—The Tim Ferriss Show podcast Pierre Hadot—Philosophy as a Way of Life We also discussed Jordan Peterson and his book 12 Rules for Life (though Bill noted that Peterson is not a Stoic in the strict sense). Bill recommended watching Peterson's interview with David Prager. Here are links to Bill's books: A Life Worth Living: Meditations on God, Death, and Stoicism (Feb. 1, 2020) Cynical Maxims and Marginalia Meditations on Self-Discipline and Failure: Stoic Exercise for Mental Fitness Dr. William Ferraiolo completed his undergraduate degree in philosophy at Rutgers University, and received a PhD in philosophy from the University of Oklahoma. Since then he’s been teaching philosophy at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California. He has two additional forthcoming books entitled You Die at the End and God Bless the Broken Bones. Find and connect with Bill online at LinkedIn and Facebook. My guest this week is Dr. William (Bill) Ferraiolo. We’ll be going all the way back to the roots of cognitive behavioral therapy in this episode—back to the Stoics of ancient Greece and Rome—as we discuss Bill's book, My guest this week is Dr. William (Bill) Ferraiolo. We’ll be going all the way back to the roots of cognitive behavioral therapy in this episode—back to the Stoics of ancient Greece and Rome—as we discuss Bill's book, Meditations on Self-Discipline and Failure: Stoic Exercise for Mental Fitness. The big idea of Stoicism is that we don’t have to let external events and our unruly minds determine our well-being. Instead, we can save our energy for training our thoughts and actions to serve us well (sounds like CBT!).<br /> <br /> Bill is passionate about these ideas and explains how they can make a major difference in our lives when we put them into practice—just as he discovered for himself. Topics we explore together include:<br /> <br /> The main tenets of Greco-Roman Stoicism<br /> The concept of eudaemonia as flourishing and leading a well-lived life<br /> The distinctions between Stoicism and common self-help philosophies<br /> The value at times of receiving a “kick in the butt” to return to our intentions<br /> The relations between Cynic and Stoic philosophy<br /> The overlap between CBT and Stoicism<br /> The imperative of self-knowledge and self-honesty<br /> The amazing durability of the Stoic ideas and ideals<br /> The futility of obsessing over things we can’t control<br /> The power of the limbic system to override our reason and our efforts toward equanimity<br /> The importance of frequent reminders of our best intentions<br /> The possibility of taking others’ opinions of us less seriously<br /> Why we place so much value on the thoughts in others’ heads<br /> The power of focusing our attention and energy on what is in our direct control<br /> Times when Stoicism seems to gain greater popularity and traction<br /> What it takes to move from insight to transformation<br /> The place of physical training, courage, and toughness in Stoicism<br /> How Stoicism has helped my guest through anxiety and depression<br /> The cultural resurgence of Stoicism<br /> <br /> Check out this link for more information on Marcus Aurelius, and this one for Epictetus. <br /> <br /> I asked Bill for recommendation for modern-day Stoics; he recommended these writers (purchases made through these affiliate links will help to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> William Irvine—A Guide to the Good Life<br /> John Sellers—The Art of Living<br /> Donald Robertson—The Philosophy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy<br /> Massimo Pigliucci—How to Be a Stoic<br /> Ryan Holliday and Steven Hanselman—The Daily Stoic<br /> A.A. Long—Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life<br /> Tim Ferriss—The Tim Ferriss Show podcast<br /> Pierre Hadot—Philosophy as a Way of Life<br /> <br /> We also discussed Jordan Peterson and his book 12 Rules for Life (though Bill noted that Peterson is not a Stoic in the strict sense). Bill recommended watching Peterson's interview with David Prager.<br /> <br /> Here are links to Bill's books:<br /> <br /> A Life Worth Living: Meditations on God, Death, and Stoicism (Feb. 1, 2020)<br /> Cynical Maxims and Marginalia <br /> Meditations on Self-Discipline and Failure: Stoic Exercise for Mental Fitness<br /> <br /> Dr. William Ferraiolo completed his undergraduate degree in philosophy at Rutgers University, and received a PhD in philosophy from the University of Oklahoma.<br /> <br /> Since then he’s been teaching philosophy at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California. He has two additional forthcoming books entitled You Die at the End and God Bless the Broken Bones.<br /> <br /> Find and connect with Bill online at LinkedIn and Facebook. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:05:53 Ep. 50: Ken Honda — How to Create a Healthier Relationship with Money http://sethgillihan.com/ep-50-ken-honda-how-to-create-a-healthier-relationship-with-money/ Wed, 10 Jul 2019 10:30:08 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14298 Have you ever felt frustrated by money? Most of us have. Maybe you feel like you’re not paid enough, or there’s barely enough to cover your expenses, or your bills seem unmanageable. Whatever the case, my guest today can help you develop a healthier relationship with money. Ken Honda is known as the “Zen Millionaire” in Japan, and he’s written a new book called Happy Money: The Japanese Art of Making Peace with Your Money, which describes how to create what Ken calls a healthy flow of money. It was great to learn more about Ken’s philosophy of money, and how it relates to our beliefs, fears, insecurities, and aspirations. Topics we explored together included: What it means to think of money as energy that can carry different emotions depending on how it was exchanged What our relationship with money can reveal about broader issues in our lives The hurts we carry related to money How realistic financial limitations early in life might affect our beliefs later on Money as a potential excuse for not pursuing one’s dreams Why our dream of “financial security” is an illusion The strong tendency to increase our spending when our income goes up The status and standing we attach to income and possessions What’s we can actually control related to money The reasons for our fears about money The strong association we make between money and survival Relationships as the best investment for security The myth of scarcity versus an abundance mindset How to arigato (appreciate) your money Compulsive savers and other approaches to money What underlies our fear of running out of money The value of money EQ (emotional intelligence) over money IQ Finding your right “container size” for money Common negative beliefs about money Tendency of couples to have opposite views on money The fundamental principles of creating a happy flow of money Ken mentioned Wahei Takeda, the "Warren Buffett of Japan"; here's a book based on his ideas: Maro Up: The Secret to Success Begins with Arigato: Wisdom from the “Warren Buffet of Japan.” And here's the link to Ken's most recent book, which to my knowledge is his first book in English: Happy Money: The Japanese Art of Making Peace with Your Money. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Ken Honda is a bestselling author of self-development books in Japan, where he’s sold more than 7 million books over the past two decades. While his financial expertise comes from owning and managing several businesses, his writings bridge the topics of finance and self-help, focusing on creating and generating personal wealth and happiness through deeper self-honesty. Ken is the first person from Japan to be voted into the Transformational Leadership Council. He’s fluent in Japanese and English, and currently lives in Tokyo. Find Ken online at his website. Have you ever felt frustrated by money? Most of us have. Maybe you feel like you’re not paid enough, or there’s barely enough to cover your expenses, or your bills seem unmanageable. Whatever the case, my guest today can help you develop a healthier re... Have you ever felt frustrated by money? Most of us have. Maybe you feel like you’re not paid enough, or there’s barely enough to cover your expenses, or your bills seem unmanageable. Whatever the case, my guest today can help you develop a healthier relationship with money.<br /> <br /> Ken Honda is known as the “Zen Millionaire” in Japan, and he’s written a new book called Happy Money: The Japanese Art of Making Peace with Your Money, which describes how to create what Ken calls a healthy flow of money.<br /> <br /> It was great to learn more about Ken’s philosophy of money, and how it relates to our beliefs, fears, insecurities, and aspirations. Topics we explored together included:<br /> <br /> What it means to think of money as energy that can carry different emotions depending on how it was exchanged<br /> What our relationship with money can reveal about broader issues in our lives<br /> The hurts we carry related to money<br /> How realistic financial limitations early in life might affect our beliefs later on<br /> Money as a potential excuse for not pursuing one’s dreams<br /> Why our dream of “financial security” is an illusion<br /> The strong tendency to increase our spending when our income goes up<br /> The status and standing we attach to income and possessions<br /> What’s we can actually control related to money<br /> The reasons for our fears about money<br /> The strong association we make between money and survival<br /> Relationships as the best investment for security<br /> The myth of scarcity versus an abundance mindset<br /> How to arigato (appreciate) your money<br /> Compulsive savers and other approaches to money<br /> What underlies our fear of running out of money<br /> The value of money EQ (emotional intelligence) over money IQ<br /> Finding your right “container size” for money<br /> Common negative beliefs about money<br /> Tendency of couples to have opposite views on money<br /> The fundamental principles of creating a happy flow of money<br /> <br /> Ken mentioned Wahei Takeda, the "Warren Buffett of Japan"; here's a book based on his ideas: Maro Up: The Secret to Success Begins with Arigato: Wisdom from the “Warren Buffet of Japan.”<br /> <br /> And here's the link to Ken's most recent book, which to my knowledge is his first book in English: Happy Money: The Japanese Art of Making Peace with Your Money. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Ken Honda is a bestselling author of self-development books in Japan, where he’s sold more than 7 million books over the past two decades.<br /> <br /> While his financial expertise comes from owning and managing several businesses, his writings bridge the topics of finance and self-help, focusing on creating and generating personal wealth and happiness through deeper self-honesty.<br /> <br /> Ken is the first person from Japan to be voted into the Transformational Leadership Council. He’s fluent in Japanese and English, and currently lives in Tokyo.<br /> <br /> Find Ken online at his website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 51:05 Ep. 49: Gregg Krech — How to Live the Life You Want http://sethgillihan.com/ep-49-gregg-krech-how-to-live-the-life-you-want/ Wed, 03 Jul 2019 10:30:43 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14286 My guest this week is Gregg Krech, who specializes in Japanese psychology. We focused on the principles of Morita therapy, which emphasizes taking action that brings meaning to one's life. This approach contrasts with our tendency to dwell on how we feel and what we feel like doing, and to get lost in self-focused attention. By asking instead, "What needs to be done?" we can build a life defined by meaning and usefulness. Topics we discussed in this episode include: Valuing action over words, and purpose over feelings The distinctions between Morita therapy and action-oriented Western therapies like CBT The power in realizing we can accomplish things that are important to us even if we’re feeling anxious, down, or other uncomfortable feeling states Overlap between Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Morita therapy Feeling better as a “fringe benefit” of Morita therapy Co-existing with one’s feeling state while doing what one wants to do The suffering that comes from self-focused attention The benefits of shifting our attention from our internal experiences to the world around us How to know which action is the right one to take at a given time The contemplative Japanese practice of Naikan Figuring out what to do by starting with action The problem with trying to figure out life in your mind The crucial role of momentum to combat paralysis The effects of technology on our attention span, and our experience of life The joy and pleasure we can find by being in the present moment of our lives The compatibility of fun with Morita therapy Feelings as one actor or actress, and not the director of the play Acceptance as a common precursor to action The Rule of 3 for setting priorities The power of helping others to put our own problems in perspective The history and mission of the Tōdō Institute in Monkton, Vermont The concept of having, on average, 30,000 days in a lifetime Early in the episode I mentioned the book that introduced me to Morita therapy, Constructive Living by David Reynolds, who offered Gregg his first introduction to Japanese psychology. (A percentage of each purchase made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Here's the fascinating book Gregg mentioned called The Un-TV and the 10 mph Car. We focused our discussion around concepts from Gregg's book The Art of Taking Action: Lessons from Japanese Psychology. Some of Gregg's other books include (these are affiliate links): A Natural Approach to Mental Wellness: Japanese Psychology and the Skills We Need for Psychological and Spiritual Health Naikan: Gratitude, Grace, and the Japanese Art of Self-Reflection Question Your Life: Naikan Self-Reflection and the Transformation of our Stories Tunneling for Sunlight: Twenty-One Maxims of Living Wisdom from Buddhism and Japanese Psychology to Cope with Difficult Times Gregg Krech is an author, poet, and one of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology in North America. His work has been featured in The Sun magazine, Tricycle, SELF, Utne Reader, Counseling Today, Cosmopolitan, and Experience Life. Gregg and his wife, Linda Anderson Krech, founded the TōDō Institute, a non-profit center in Vermont that uses Japanese psychology as an alternative to traditional Western approaches to psychology. Over the past 25 years, Gregg has introduced Japanese Psychology—particularly Naikan Therapy, Morita Therapy, and Kaizen—to thousands of people through his books, workshops, retreats, and online courses. His work supports a blend of the psychological, the spiritual and the practical, and helps individuals to clarify purpose, cultivate gratitude, develop compassion and engage in meaningful action. Gregg is a member of the North American Naikan Counsel and Editor-in-Chief for the quarterly journal Thirty Thousand Days: A Journal for Purposeful Living. My guest this week is Gregg Krech, who specializes in Japanese psychology. We focused on the principles of Morita therapy, which emphasizes taking action that brings meaning to one's life. This approach contrasts with our tendency to dwell on how we fe... My guest this week is Gregg Krech, who specializes in Japanese psychology. We focused on the principles of Morita therapy, which emphasizes taking action that brings meaning to one's life. This approach contrasts with our tendency to dwell on how we feel and what we feel like doing, and to get lost in self-focused attention. By asking instead, "What needs to be done?" we can build a life defined by meaning and usefulness.<br /> <br /> Topics we discussed in this episode include:<br /> <br /> Valuing action over words, and purpose over feelings<br /> The distinctions between Morita therapy and action-oriented Western therapies like CBT<br /> The power in realizing we can accomplish things that are important to us even if we’re feeling anxious, down, or other uncomfortable feeling states<br /> Overlap between Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Morita therapy<br /> Feeling better as a “fringe benefit” of Morita therapy<br /> Co-existing with one’s feeling state while doing what one wants to do<br /> The suffering that comes from self-focused attention<br /> The benefits of shifting our attention from our internal experiences to the world around us<br /> How to know which action is the right one to take at a given time<br /> The contemplative Japanese practice of Naikan<br /> Figuring out what to do by starting with action<br /> The problem with trying to figure out life in your mind<br /> The crucial role of momentum to combat paralysis<br /> The effects of technology on our attention span, and our experience of life<br /> The joy and pleasure we can find by being in the present moment of our lives<br /> The compatibility of fun with Morita therapy<br /> Feelings as one actor or actress, and not the director of the play<br /> Acceptance as a common precursor to action<br /> The Rule of 3 for setting priorities<br /> The power of helping others to put our own problems in perspective<br /> The history and mission of the Tōdō Institute in Monkton, Vermont<br /> The concept of having, on average, 30,000 days in a lifetime<br /> <br /> Early in the episode I mentioned the book that introduced me to Morita therapy, Constructive Living by David Reynolds, who offered Gregg his first introduction to Japanese psychology. (A percentage of each purchase made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Here's the fascinating book Gregg mentioned called The Un-TV and the 10 mph Car.<br /> <br /> We focused our discussion around concepts from Gregg's book The Art of Taking Action: Lessons from Japanese Psychology. Some of Gregg's other books include (these are affiliate links):<br /> <br /> A Natural Approach to Mental Wellness: Japanese Psychology and the Skills We Need for Psychological and Spiritual Health<br /> Naikan: Gratitude, Grace, and the Japanese Art of Self-Reflection<br /> Question Your Life: Naikan Self-Reflection and the Transformation of our Stories<br /> Tunneling for Sunlight: Twenty-One Maxims of Living Wisdom from Buddhism and Japanese Psychology to Cope with Difficult Times<br /> <br /> Gregg Krech is an author, poet, and one of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology in North America. His work has been featured in The Sun magazine, Tricycle, SELF, Utne Reader, Counseling Today, Cosmopolitan, and Experience Life.<br /> <br /> Gregg and his wife, Linda Anderson Krech, founded the TōDō Institute, a non-profit center in Vermont that uses Japanese psychology as an alternative to traditional Western approaches to psychology.<br /> <br /> Over the past 25 years, Gregg has introduced Japanese Psychology—particularly Naikan Therapy, Morita Therapy, and Kaizen—to thousands of people through his books, workshops, retreats, and online courses. His work supports a blend of the psychological, the spiritual and the practical, and helps individuals to clarify purpose, Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:00:44 Ep. 48: Tim Senesi — How to Get the Most out of Your Home Yoga Practice http://sethgillihan.com/ep-48-tim-senesi-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-home-yoga-practice/ Wed, 26 Jun 2019 10:30:11 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14275 My guest this week is yoga instructor Tim Senesi. Tim hosts the popular Yoga with Tim YouTube channel, and teaches classes near his home in Southern California. It was great to talk with Tim about his love of yoga, what drew him to it, and what inspires him as a teacher. I’ve done countless of his online videos myself and haven’t found any better instruction than what Tim offers every week. Topics we touched on in our relatively brief discussion included: How Tim got into yoga How our actions create our reality Yoga as a laboratory to go inward The year-long legal debacle over the previous Yoga with Tim YouTube channel Tim’s evolution as an online yoga instructor The disillusionment with common definitions of “happiness” that led Tim to yoga The value of yoga retreats (check out Tim's retreats here) How Tim’s yoga practice and instruction developed How to approach savasana (corpse pose) at the end of a yoga session Physical practice as a way to enter into deeper mental and emotional experiences The connection between anxiety and the breath The importance of daily practice to get the benefits of yoga The place of humor in yoga practice Tim recommended two books by B. K. S. Iyengar for those who want to learn more about the Iyengar method of yoga, which has heavily influenced Tim's approach (a percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Light on Life Light on Yoga Tim and I discussed the difference between his previous yoga channel and his current one. Here's the back health video we talked about from his old channel: Yoga Stretches for Low Back Pain And a more recent one filmed with his friend and assistant Stacy: Yoga for Back Pain 15 Minute Stretch, Sciatica Flexibility & Core Strengthening The instruction in both is equally excellent, but the difference in energy is very apparent. Tim's YouTube channel is here: Yoga with Tim, where you can subscribe and get notified when he posts free weekly instructional videos. If you're interested in deepening your home yoga practice, consider joining Tim's Conscious Movement community and supporting his work at the same time through a monthly subscription. Tim Senesi has been practicing yoga since he was a college student. He found he was living a toxic lifestyle and tried yoga as a means to a healthier life. Although he struggled with the shapes and was sweating profusely as he tried to keep up, he discovered something unusual at the end of class: his head got quiet and he felt at peace. That glimpse of what he was looking for compelled him to stick with it, and soon he started feeling more connected to his body. He noticed that drinking alcohol or getting high didn't provide the same connection and relief that he felt at the end of that first yoga class. Soon Tim was practicing yoga every day, so there was no more time to eat junk food or stay out late drinking, as he knew he wouldn't like how he felt the next morning on the mat. Yoga slowly changed his life, one day at a time. Tim changed who he hung out with, started making healthier decisions, and built a community of supportive like-minded friends. And he knew from his experience on the yoga mat that a challenge was an opportunity for growth. Tim soon fell into teaching yoga, as he describes in this episode. He was drawn to the Iyengar method, which made sense to him as it was concrete, focused, and effective. He was then introduced to Vinnie Marino’s class and realized he could take ideas from his Iyengar foundation and blend them into his own style of Vinyasa Flow.   You can find Tim online at his website where you can sign up for weekly updates, on Instagram, and on Facebook. My guest this week is yoga instructor Tim Senesi. Tim hosts the popular Yoga with Tim YouTube channel, and teaches classes near his home in Southern California. It was great to talk with Tim about his love of yoga, what drew him to it, My guest this week is yoga instructor Tim Senesi. Tim hosts the popular Yoga with Tim YouTube channel, and teaches classes near his home in Southern California. It was great to talk with Tim about his love of yoga, what drew him to it, and what inspires him as a teacher. I’ve done countless of his online videos myself and haven’t found any better instruction than what Tim offers every week.<br /> <br /> Topics we touched on in our relatively brief discussion included:<br /> <br /> How Tim got into yoga<br /> How our actions create our reality<br /> Yoga as a laboratory to go inward<br /> The year-long legal debacle over the previous Yoga with Tim YouTube channel<br /> Tim’s evolution as an online yoga instructor<br /> The disillusionment with common definitions of “happiness” that led Tim to yoga<br /> The value of yoga retreats (check out Tim's retreats here)<br /> How Tim’s yoga practice and instruction developed<br /> How to approach savasana (corpse pose) at the end of a yoga session<br /> Physical practice as a way to enter into deeper mental and emotional experiences<br /> The connection between anxiety and the breath<br /> The importance of daily practice to get the benefits of yoga<br /> The place of humor in yoga practice<br /> <br /> Tim recommended two books by B. K. S. Iyengar for those who want to learn more about the Iyengar method of yoga, which has heavily influenced Tim's approach (a percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> Light on Life<br /> <br /> Light on Yoga<br /> <br /> Tim and I discussed the difference between his previous yoga channel and his current one. Here's the back health video we talked about from his old channel:<br /> <br /> Yoga Stretches for Low Back Pain<br /> <br /> And a more recent one filmed with his friend and assistant Stacy:<br /> <br /> Yoga for Back Pain 15 Minute Stretch, Sciatica Flexibility & Core Strengthening<br /> <br /> The instruction in both is equally excellent, but the difference in energy is very apparent.<br /> <br /> Tim's YouTube channel is here: Yoga with Tim, where you can subscribe and get notified when he posts free weekly instructional videos.<br /> <br /> If you're interested in deepening your home yoga practice, consider joining Tim's Conscious Movement community and supporting his work at the same time through a monthly subscription.<br /> <br /> <br /> Tim Senesi has been practicing yoga since he was a college student. He found he was living a toxic lifestyle and tried yoga as a means to a healthier life. Although he struggled with the shapes and was sweating profusely as he tried to keep up, he discovered something unusual at the end of class: his head got quiet and he felt at peace.<br /> <br /> That glimpse of what he was looking for compelled him to stick with it, and soon he started feeling more connected to his body. He noticed that drinking alcohol or getting high didn't provide the same connection and relief that he felt at the end of that first yoga class.<br /> <br /> Soon Tim was practicing yoga every day, so there was no more time to eat junk food or stay out late drinking, as he knew he wouldn't like how he felt the next morning on the mat. Yoga slowly changed his life, one day at a time.<br /> <br /> Tim changed who he hung out with, started making healthier decisions, and built a community of supportive like-minded friends. And he knew from his experience on the yoga mat that a challenge was an opportunity for growth.<br /> <br /> Tim soon fell into teaching yoga, as he describes in this episode. He was drawn to the Iyengar method, which made sense to him as it was concrete, focused, and effective. He was then introduced to Vinnie Marino’s class and realized he could take ideas from his Iyengar foundation and blend them into his own style of Vinyasa Flow.  <br /> Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 30:03 Ep. 47: Jules Blaine Davis — Exploring Our Deep Hunger for Presence and Connection http://sethgillihan.com/ep-47-jules-blaine-davis-exploring-our-deep-hunger-for-presence-and-connection/ Wed, 19 Jun 2019 10:30:26 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14263 My guest this week is Jules Blaine Davis. It’s hard to capture who Jules is or what she does in a few words, which is part of what I enjoyed about this conversation. The best I can do is to say that she helps people to reconnect—with themselves, with their needs, with what it means to nourish and be nourished, and what it means to really relate to another person. She also shared about her medical diagnosis within the past year or so, and I think you’ll find she brings a really unique perspective to that whole experience. Ideas we explored included: What it means to be a “kitchen healer” Bringing forward the everyday mysteries that fill our lives The influence of our early kitchen experiences The kitchen as the center of our homes and a reflection of our lives Our loss of connection to the kitchen Our hunger to be rather than to do, and for connection and presence Jules’s practice of Wood Board Love Our deep desire to be fed and nourished Knowing others intimately through their food Motherhood as an opportunity to grow The women’s retreats that Jules leads (here's an example of a previous one) Allowing ourselves not to know, and simply to be present The immense mystery of our bodies Jules’s recent medical issue Giving ourselves permission to be exactly where we are Finding retreat in our everyday lives The value in attending to ourselves before we’re in acute pain julesblainedavis.com; Instagram - @julesbdavis Photo from julesblainedavis.com Here's the talk Jules and I referenced at the Olympic Boulevard Women TEDX  event. Jules is a mother of two, and an artist in many realms with a background in performing arts, painting, poetry, healing, movement and meditation. About eight years ago, she invited new mothers and their kids to her home for a music class. The experience she had with them related to food and fellowship opened her eyes to the needs all around us. Discover more about Jules at her website, and connect with her on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. My guest this week is Jules Blaine Davis. It’s hard to capture who Jules is or what she does in a few words, which is part of what I enjoyed about this conversation. The best I can do is to say that she helps people to reconnect—with themselves, My guest this week is Jules Blaine Davis. It’s hard to capture who Jules is or what she does in a few words, which is part of what I enjoyed about this conversation. The best I can do is to say that she helps people to reconnect—with themselves, with their needs, with what it means to nourish and be nourished, and what it means to really relate to another person.<br /> <br /> She also shared about her medical diagnosis within the past year or so, and I think you’ll find she brings a really unique perspective to that whole experience. Ideas we explored included:<br /> <br /> What it means to be a “kitchen healer”<br /> Bringing forward the everyday mysteries that fill our lives<br /> The influence of our early kitchen experiences<br /> The kitchen as the center of our homes and a reflection of our lives<br /> Our loss of connection to the kitchen<br /> Our hunger to be rather than to do, and for connection and presence<br /> Jules’s practice of Wood Board Love<br /> Our deep desire to be fed and nourished<br /> Knowing others intimately through their food<br /> Motherhood as an opportunity to grow<br /> The women’s retreats that Jules leads (here's an example of a previous one)<br /> Allowing ourselves not to know, and simply to be present<br /> The immense mystery of our bodies<br /> Jules’s recent medical issue<br /> Giving ourselves permission to be exactly where we are<br /> Finding retreat in our everyday lives<br /> The value in attending to ourselves before we’re in acute pain<br /> julesblainedavis.com; Instagram - @julesbdavis<br /> <br /> Photo from julesblainedavis.com<br /> <br /> Here's the talk Jules and I referenced at the Olympic Boulevard Women TEDX  event.<br /> <br /> Jules is a mother of two, and an artist in many realms with a background in performing arts, painting, poetry, healing, movement and meditation.<br /> <br /> About eight years ago, she invited new mothers and their kids to her home for a music class. The experience she had with them related to food and fellowship opened her eyes to the needs all around us.<br /> <br /> Discover more about Jules at her website, and connect with her on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:18:27 Ep. 46: Joe Lamp’l — How to Renew Your Mind, Body, and Spirit in the Garden http://sethgillihan.com/ep-46-joe-lampl-how-to-renew-your-mind-body-and-spirit-in-the-garden/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 10:30:19 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14229 I've enjoyed having a garden for many years, and recently it's taken on deeper significance in my life. So I loved this conversation with this week's guest Joe Lamp'l, the Joe behind Joe Gardener®, as we discussed the many benefits of gardening. Physical exercise and fresh produce are obvious advantages, and we also explored the mental, emotional, and even spiritual benefits of being in your garden. Topics we touched on included: Gardening as a way to combat perfectionistic tendencies The easy connection and camaraderie among gardeners Seeing gardening “mistakes” as opportunities to learn Applications of a fixed vs. growth mindset Practicing trust and acceptance in the garden Joe’s aha! moment that drew him into gardening Why we have such an emotional connection to food taken directly from the ground Being a steward of the earth The advantages of natural gardening (here's a link to the effects of exposure to the chemical pesticide diazinon, which I experienced as a teen) The role of gardeners in helping our planet to heal Nurturing a relationship with our gardens The therapeutic effects of gardening The layout of Joe’s beautiful garden farm Common mistakes among new gardeners The network of life beneath the soil’s surface Joe shared with me his photo of the first monarch that returned to his garden, which I've posted here. Here's the link to Joe's excellent (and free) Complete Guide to Home Composting where you can also sign up for his newsletter. We discussed a couple episodes of Joe's Growing a Greener World television series: Stone Barns Center & Blue Hill: The Best of Food and Agriculture in which the man had an epiphany simply by pulling a carrot from the ground. Waking Up the Garden Farm™ which chronicles Joe's collaboration with his daughter in developing a tomato seedling operation. Joe Lamp’l (aka joe gardener®) has been hooked on horticulture since childhood. He is one of the country’s most recognized and trusted personalities in gardening and sustainability, with a passion for living a greener life. That passion is evident to a nationwide audience who turns to him for gardening advice through his new joe gardener Online Gardening Academy™ and watches him in his current role as Creator, Executive Producer, and Host of the Emmy-award-winning PBS series, Growing a Greener World® and, previously, as host of Fresh from the Garden on DIY Network (and more). Joe also shares his know-how on NBC’s TODAY SHOW, ABC’s Good Morning America, The Weather Channel and through his popular books, podcast series, and more. Joe’s past awards include The American Horticultural Society’s B.Y. Morrison Communication Award, which recognizes effective and inspirational communication—through print, radio, television, and online media, t Best On-Air Talent for Television by The Garden Writers Association, and the Taste Awards for Best Branded Television Series, Best Environmental Television, Series, Film or Video, and Breakout Storyteller of the Year for a television series, and 2018 Daytime Emmy Award for Best Lifestyle Program. Joe is also the founder and “Joe” behind joegardener.com – a gardening-intensive website with a focus is on how-to videos, podcasts, online courses, and blog posts around the most popular topics gardeners want to know. When not talking or writing about green living, Joe can likely be found in and around his organic garden and spending time with his family on their Atlanta, GA farm. Find Joe online at his website, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. And if you're interested in enrolling in his highly acclaimed online gardening academy, check that out here. I've enjoyed having a garden for many years, and recently it's taken on deeper significance in my life. So I loved this conversation with this week's guest Joe Lamp'l, the Joe behind Joe Gardener®, as we discussed the many benefits of gardening. I've enjoyed having a garden for many years, and recently it's taken on deeper significance in my life. So I loved this conversation with this week's guest Joe Lamp'l, the Joe behind Joe Gardener®, as we discussed the many benefits of gardening. Physical exercise and fresh produce are obvious advantages, and we also explored the mental, emotional, and even spiritual benefits of being in your garden.<br /> <br /> Topics we touched on included:<br /> <br /> Gardening as a way to combat perfectionistic tendencies<br /> The easy connection and camaraderie among gardeners<br /> Seeing gardening “mistakes” as opportunities to learn<br /> Applications of a fixed vs. growth mindset<br /> Practicing trust and acceptance in the garden<br /> Joe’s aha! moment that drew him into gardening<br /> Why we have such an emotional connection to food taken directly from the ground<br /> Being a steward of the earth<br /> The advantages of natural gardening (here's a link to the effects of exposure to the chemical pesticide diazinon, which I experienced as a teen)<br /> The role of gardeners in helping our planet to heal<br /> Nurturing a relationship with our gardens<br /> The therapeutic effects of gardening<br /> The layout of Joe’s beautiful garden farm<br /> Common mistakes among new gardeners<br /> The network of life beneath the soil’s surface<br /> <br /> Joe shared with me his photo of the first monarch that returned to his garden, which I've posted here.<br /> <br /> Here's the link to Joe's excellent (and free) Complete Guide to Home Composting where you can also sign up for his newsletter.<br /> <br /> We discussed a couple episodes of Joe's Growing a Greener World television series:<br /> <br /> Stone Barns Center & Blue Hill: The Best of Food and Agriculture in which the man had an epiphany simply by pulling a carrot from the ground.<br /> <br /> Waking Up the Garden Farm™ which chronicles Joe's collaboration with his daughter in developing a tomato seedling operation.<br /> <br /> Joe Lamp’l (aka joe gardener®) has been hooked on horticulture since childhood. He is one of the country’s most recognized and trusted personalities in gardening and sustainability, with a passion for living a greener life.<br /> <br /> That passion is evident to a nationwide audience who turns to him for gardening advice through his new joe gardener Online Gardening Academy™ and watches him in his current role as Creator, Executive Producer, and Host of the Emmy-award-winning PBS series, Growing a Greener World® and, previously, as host of Fresh from the Garden on DIY Network (and more).<br /> <br /> Joe also shares his know-how on NBC’s TODAY SHOW, ABC’s Good Morning America, The Weather Channel and through his popular books, podcast series, and more.<br /> <br /> Joe’s past awards include The American Horticultural Society’s B.Y. Morrison Communication Award, which recognizes effective and inspirational communication—through print, radio, television, and online media, t Best On-Air Talent for Television by The Garden Writers Association, and the Taste Awards for Best Branded Television Series, Best Environmental Television, Series, Film or Video, and Breakout Storyteller of the Year for a television series, and 2018 Daytime Emmy Award for Best Lifestyle Program.<br /> <br /> Joe is also the founder and “Joe” behind joegardener.com – a gardening-intensive website with a focus is on how-to videos, podcasts, online courses, and blog posts around the most popular topics gardeners want to know.<br /> <br /> When not talking or writing about green living, Joe can likely be found in and around his organic garden and spending time with his family on their Atlanta, GA farm.<br /> <br /> Find Joe online at his website, and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. And if you're interested in enrolling in his highly acclaimed online gardening academy, check that out here. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:04:51 Ep. 45: Renee Linnell — How to Free Yourself from Manipulative Relationships http://sethgillihan.com/ep-45-renee-linnell-how-to-free-yourself-from-manipulative-relationships/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 10:30:15 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14200 Have you ever found yourself stuck in a manipulative relationship—you know deep down it's toxic, yet each time you try to leave you're pulled back in? My guest this week is Renee Linnell, who had exactly that experience during her time in a religious cult. She offers an intimate look at that period in her life in her recent book, The Burn Zone: A Memoir, which I explored with her on this week's episode. Topics we discussed included: Experiencing the original mind state of pure love The danger in deifying spiritual teachers The author’s experiences of Buddhism How people end up in abusive and manipulative relationships Life experiences that can make us vulnerable to being manipulated by others Relationships between narcissists and people who are co-dependent Lessons we can learn from everything “bad” that happens to us How denying our intuition can lead us to stay in toxic relationships Gaslighting in manipulative relationships (with shoutout to previous guest Dr. Stephanie Sarkis) Ways that social isolation facilitates mind control Intermittent reinforcement in manipulative relationships A realistic vision of enlightenment as accepting life just as it is Finding happiness by being ourselves The connection between pain and wisdom The freedom that comes from taking our focus off ourselves The powerful effect of taking small actions to be of service to others What it means to be a warrior Practical ways to show ourselves love In Her Image Photography Here are the links to Renee's highly engaging book (a percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): The Burn Zone: A Memoir Click here for the Audible Audiobook edition. Renee Linnell completed her Executive MBA at the NYU Stern School of Business. A serial entrepreneur, she has founded and cofounded five companies. She is currently working on starting a publishing company to give people from diverse walks of life an opportunity to tell their stories. Renee divides her time between Colorado and Southern California. Find Renee online at her website and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Have you ever found yourself stuck in a manipulative relationship—you know deep down it's toxic, yet each time you try to leave you're pulled back in? My guest this week is Renee Linnell, who had exactly that experience during her time in a religious c... Have you ever found yourself stuck in a manipulative relationship—you know deep down it's toxic, yet each time you try to leave you're pulled back in? My guest this week is Renee Linnell, who had exactly that experience during her time in a religious cult. She offers an intimate look at that period in her life in her recent book, The Burn Zone: A Memoir, which I explored with her on this week's episode.<br /> <br /> Topics we discussed included:<br /> <br /> Experiencing the original mind state of pure love<br /> The danger in deifying spiritual teachers<br /> The author’s experiences of Buddhism<br /> How people end up in abusive and manipulative relationships<br /> Life experiences that can make us vulnerable to being manipulated by others<br /> Relationships between narcissists and people who are co-dependent<br /> Lessons we can learn from everything “bad” that happens to us<br /> How denying our intuition can lead us to stay in toxic relationships<br /> Gaslighting in manipulative relationships (with shoutout to previous guest Dr. Stephanie Sarkis)<br /> Ways that social isolation facilitates mind control<br /> Intermittent reinforcement in manipulative relationships<br /> A realistic vision of enlightenment as accepting life just as it is<br /> Finding happiness by being ourselves<br /> The connection between pain and wisdom<br /> The freedom that comes from taking our focus off ourselves<br /> The powerful effect of taking small actions to be of service to others<br /> What it means to be a warrior<br /> Practical ways to show ourselves love<br /> <br /> In Her Image Photography<br /> <br /> Here are the links to Renee's highly engaging book (a percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): <br /> <br /> The Burn Zone: A Memoir<br /> <br /> Click here for the Audible Audiobook edition.<br /> <br /> Renee Linnell completed her Executive MBA at the NYU Stern School of Business. A serial entrepreneur, she has founded and cofounded five companies. <br /> <br /> She is currently working on starting a publishing company to give people from diverse walks of life an opportunity to tell their stories. Renee divides her time between Colorado and Southern California.<br /> <br /> Find Renee online at her website and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 48:31 Ep. 44: Ora Nadrich — How to Awaken into Every Moment of Your Life http://sethgillihan.com/ep-44-ora-nadrich-how-to-awaken-into-every-moment-of-your-life/ Wed, 29 May 2019 10:30:59 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14190 How can we practice more presence in our lives and stay connected with our truest selves? My guest this week is Ora Nadrich, a mindfulness instructor who addresses these questions in her recent book, Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity. We discussed her book and her approach to mindful living, touching on topics that included: The definition and practice of mindfulness Slowing down to savor an experience, like a cup of coffee or a piece of chocolate The dangers of stripping away the deeper elements of mindfulness The connection between mindfulness and authenticity Our “innermost self” as the core truth of who we are Our habitual and insatiable desire for “more” Remembering our spiritual selves that we can come home to Awakening to our existence and valuing every moment The effects of constant technology use on our minds, bodies, and spirits The practice of “life gazing,” and simply observing what we see in our lives Red lights as cues to be in our lives Ways to raise our consciousness through our daily actions Setting our intention first thing in the morning Both of Ora's books are available on Amazon (a portion of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity Says Who? How One Simple Question Can Change the Way You Think Forever Ora Nadrich is an author and founder and president of the Institute for Transformational Thinking. A certified life coach and mindfulness teacher, she specializes in transformational thinking, self-discovery, and mentoring new coaches as they develop their careers. Find Ora online at her website and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. How can we practice more presence in our lives and stay connected with our truest selves? My guest this week is Ora Nadrich, a mindfulness instructor who addresses these questions in her recent book, Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity. How can we practice more presence in our lives and stay connected with our truest selves? My guest this week is Ora Nadrich, a mindfulness instructor who addresses these questions in her recent book, Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity. We discussed her book and her approach to mindful living, touching on topics that included:<br /> <br /> The definition and practice of mindfulness<br /> Slowing down to savor an experience, like a cup of coffee or a piece of chocolate<br /> The dangers of stripping away the deeper elements of mindfulness<br /> The connection between mindfulness and authenticity<br /> Our “innermost self” as the core truth of who we are<br /> Our habitual and insatiable desire for “more”<br /> Remembering our spiritual selves that we can come home to<br /> Awakening to our existence and valuing every moment<br /> The effects of constant technology use on our minds, bodies, and spirits<br /> The practice of “life gazing,” and simply observing what we see in our lives<br /> Red lights as cues to be in our lives<br /> Ways to raise our consciousness through our daily actions<br /> Setting our intention first thing in the morning<br /> <br /> Both of Ora's books are available on Amazon (a portion of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity<br /> Says Who? How One Simple Question Can Change the Way You Think Forever<br /> <br /> Ora Nadrich is an author and founder and president of the Institute for Transformational Thinking.<br /> <br /> A certified life coach and mindfulness teacher, she specializes in transformational thinking, self-discovery, and mentoring new coaches as they develop their careers.<br /> <br /> Find Ora online at her website and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 48:10 Ep. 43: Alejandra Costello — How to Improve Your Life by Organizing Your Home http://sethgillihan.com/ep-43-alejandra-costello/ Wed, 22 May 2019 10:30:49 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14179 My guest this week is Alejandra Costello, a professional organizer with over one million YouTube subscribers. Alejandra shared key principles for decluttering your home and getting organized. We also explore the many positive effects of tidying up, from the obvious improvement in your living space to the deeper mental and emotional benefits. Topics we discussed included: The importance of having systems in place to maintain organization Being in the right mental space to start decluttering The emotions that get tied up in our stuff and our efforts to declutter The balance between decluttering and organizing The downside of having lots of storage space that allows for clutter The advantage of taking care of clutter sooner rather than later Common obstacles to decluttering Feeling overwhelmed by the sheer volume of things to sort through and make decisions about The value of focusing on how life will improve by letting go of unneeded items The importance of trust when letting go of stuff The freedom we feel in letting go of things The hidden costs of holding onto unnecessary clutter The challenges of organizing when you have children Having a place for everything Saying “no” to things that don’t serve your soul The attraction of simplifying Daily organization tasks for well-being Check out Alejandra's YouTube channel, where she shares countless tips for organizing every living space: Home Organizing by Alejandra. As you’ll hear, Alejandra loves organizing and finds her work to be very meaningful, even sacred. Alejandra Costello is an organizing coach who helps people declutter and get organized so they can focus on what matters more. She believes clutter can get in the way of life, trigger painful emotions, and damage our relationships. But with the right tools, strategies, & attitude, she has faith anyone can get organized. Over the past decade Alejandra has taught students in 132 countries around the world. Her instructional videos have been viewed over 100 million times. She’s been named “The Decluttering Queen” by Good Morning America and her work has been featured on HGTV and the New York Times. Learn more about Alejandra and her work at her website. My guest this week is Alejandra Costello, a professional organizer with over one million YouTube subscribers. Alejandra shared key principles for decluttering your home and getting organized. We also explore the many positive effects of tidying up, My guest this week is Alejandra Costello, a professional organizer with over one million YouTube subscribers. Alejandra shared key principles for decluttering your home and getting organized. We also explore the many positive effects of tidying up, from the obvious improvement in your living space to the deeper mental and emotional benefits.<br /> <br /> Topics we discussed included:<br /> <br /> The importance of having systems in place to maintain organization<br /> Being in the right mental space to start decluttering<br /> The emotions that get tied up in our stuff and our efforts to declutter<br /> The balance between decluttering and organizing<br /> The downside of having lots of storage space that allows for clutter<br /> The advantage of taking care of clutter sooner rather than later<br /> Common obstacles to decluttering<br /> Feeling overwhelmed by the sheer volume of things to sort through and make decisions about<br /> The value of focusing on how life will improve by letting go of unneeded items<br /> The importance of trust when letting go of stuff<br /> The freedom we feel in letting go of things<br /> The hidden costs of holding onto unnecessary clutter<br /> The challenges of organizing when you have children<br /> Having a place for everything<br /> Saying “no” to things that don’t serve your soul<br /> The attraction of simplifying<br /> Daily organization tasks for well-being<br /> <br /> Check out Alejandra's YouTube channel, where she shares countless tips for organizing every living space: Home Organizing by Alejandra.<br /> <br /> As you’ll hear, Alejandra loves organizing and finds her work to be very meaningful, even sacred.<br /> <br /> Alejandra Costello is an organizing coach who helps people declutter and get organized so they can focus on what matters more.<br /> <br /> She believes clutter can get in the way of life, trigger painful emotions, and damage our relationships. But with the right tools, strategies, & attitude, she has faith anyone can get organized.<br /> <br /> Over the past decade Alejandra has taught students in 132 countries around the world. Her instructional videos have been viewed over 100 million times. She’s been named “The Decluttering Queen” by Good Morning America and her work has been featured on HGTV and the New York Times.<br /> <br /> Learn more about Alejandra and her work at her website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 41:37 Ep. 42: Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath — How to Grow in Your Loving Relationships http://sethgillihan.com/ep-42-dr-polly-young-eisendrath-how-to-grow-in-your-loving-relationships/ Wed, 15 May 2019 10:30:36 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14172 My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath. We talked about the big ideas from her recent book, Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path. Polly presents an inspiring view of committed relationships—not at all an idealized view, as she acknowledges the challenges in sharing life with another person. But she’s clear about the possibilities that await us in truly relating to someone over time. Her ideas might change how you think about and how you experience your own relationships. Topics we explored included: Dialogue therapy for couples (which Polly developed) The mixed blessing of evolving romantic relationships in the 21st century Our desire to be seen, heard, and felt by a partner The expectation that partners will fill many roles How loving relationships can help us to grow as human beings How our own thoughts and feelings bias our perceptions of our partner The value of allowing a “mindful gap” between partners The inevitable idealization and merger of partners when first falling in love Projective identification, in which we evoke predictable responses from our partners How unconscious communication affects relationships Freud’s concept of a “repetition compulsion” The value of mindful presence in couple communication The importance of checking to see if you’ve heard your partner accurately The effect of true curiosity in couple communication How sex changes a relationship What many people fear about true love The terror of being seen and known by another Here are links to Polly's books (a percentage of each sale made through these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance The Present Heart: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Discovery The Resilient Spirit: Transforming Suffering Into Insight And Renewal Click here for the Enemies: War to Wisdom podcast.  Polly Young-Eisendrath, PhD, is a Jungian analyst, psychologist, teacher and author. She is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont and in private practice in central Vermont. Polly is the originator of Dialogue Therapy, which is designed to help couples and others (for example, parents and grown children) transform chronic conflict into greater closeness and development. Dialogue Therapy has been expanded, in recent years, to include methods of Mindfulness, alongside its unique combination of Object Relations and Psychodrama. In January 2019, Shambhala/Random House published Polly’s new book, Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path, which offers her vision of personal love as a spiritual path and draws on her experience of 30 years as a Dialogue Therapist and Jungian psychoanalyst. Polly’s clinical practice and teaching have focused on individual psychotherapy and analysis, as well as Dialogue Therapy. She is past president of the Vermont Association for Psychoanalytic Studies and a founding member of the Vermont Institute for the Psychotherapies. She is also a Mindfulness teacher and has been a practitioner of Buddhism since 1971. Polly is the author or editor of eighteen books, ranging from parenting, adult development, intimate and parental love, Buddhist theory, Jungian psychology to women’s development, couple therapy, couple development, and various paths to awakening/enlightenment from meditation to personal love. These books have been translated into more than twenty languages. In the fall of 2018, Polly began the podcast ENEMIES: From War to Wisdom with co-host Eleanor Johnson. You can find Polly online at her website. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath. We talked about the big ideas from her recent book, Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path. Polly presents an inspiring view of committed relationships—not at all an idealize... My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath. We talked about the big ideas from her recent book, Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path. Polly presents an inspiring view of committed relationships—not at all an idealized view, as she acknowledges the challenges in sharing life with another person. But she’s clear about the possibilities that await us in truly relating to someone over time. Her ideas might change how you think about and how you experience your own relationships.<br /> <br /> Topics we explored included:<br /> <br /> Dialogue therapy for couples (which Polly developed)<br /> The mixed blessing of evolving romantic relationships in the 21st century<br /> Our desire to be seen, heard, and felt by a partner<br /> The expectation that partners will fill many roles<br /> How loving relationships can help us to grow as human beings<br /> How our own thoughts and feelings bias our perceptions of our partner<br /> The value of allowing a “mindful gap” between partners<br /> The inevitable idealization and merger of partners when first falling in love<br /> Projective identification, in which we evoke predictable responses from our partners<br /> How unconscious communication affects relationships<br /> Freud’s concept of a “repetition compulsion”<br /> The value of mindful presence in couple communication<br /> The importance of checking to see if you’ve heard your partner accurately<br /> The effect of true curiosity in couple communication<br /> How sex changes a relationship<br /> What many people fear about true love<br /> The terror of being seen and known by another<br /> <br /> Here are links to Polly's books (a percentage of each sale made through these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path<br /> The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance<br /> The Present Heart: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Discovery<br /> The Resilient Spirit: Transforming Suffering Into Insight And Renewal<br /> <br /> Click here for the Enemies: War to Wisdom podcast. <br /> <br /> Polly Young-Eisendrath, PhD, is a Jungian analyst, psychologist, teacher and author. She is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont and in private practice in central Vermont. Polly is the originator of Dialogue Therapy, which is designed to help couples and others (for example, parents and grown children) transform chronic conflict into greater closeness and development.<br /> <br /> Dialogue Therapy has been expanded, in recent years, to include methods of Mindfulness, alongside its unique combination of Object Relations and Psychodrama. In January 2019, Shambhala/Random House published Polly’s new book, Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path, which offers her vision of personal love as a spiritual path and draws on her experience of 30 years as a Dialogue Therapist and Jungian psychoanalyst.<br /> <br /> Polly’s clinical practice and teaching have focused on individual psychotherapy and analysis, as well as Dialogue Therapy. She is past president of the Vermont Association for Psychoanalytic Studies and a founding member of the Vermont Institute for the Psychotherapies. She is also a Mindfulness teacher and has been a practitioner of Buddhism since 1971.<br /> <br /> Polly is the author or editor of eighteen books, ranging from parenting, adult development, intimate and parental love, Buddhist theory, Jungian psychology to women’s development, couple therapy, couple development, and various paths to awakening/enlightenment from meditation to personal love. These books have been translated into more than twenty languages. In the fall of 2018, Polly began the podcast ENEMIES: From War to Wisdom with co-host Eleanor Johnson.<br /> <br /> Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:02:15 Ep. 41: Skip Prichard — How to Avoid the Biggest Obstacles to Happiness and Success http://sethgillihan.com/ep-41-skip-prichard-how-to-avoid-the-biggest-obstacles-to-happiness-and-success/ Wed, 08 May 2019 10:30:52 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14160 What is the surest path to success and contentment in life, and what are the mistakes to avoid along the way? My guest this week is Skip Prichard, who has thought a lot about these questions. He's distilled his insights into his Wall Street Journal bestselling book, The Book of Mistakes: 9 Secrets to Creating a Successful Future. We explored some of the nine secrets as we discussed his book,  and the many benefits of avoiding these mistakes. Topics we explored included: Why some people are wildly successful and others are struggling The author’s takeaways from observing or interviewing over 1000 people The power of storytelling to convey important principles The problem with following someone else’s dream The value of learning crucial lessons as early in life as possible The role of struggle and mistakes in our growth How to live your dream while working for someone else What holds us back from authoring our own lives Our tendency to drift through our lives, and then wonder, “How did I get here?” Placing blame rather than taking personal responsibility The downsides of surrounding ourselves with people who encourage our excuses Why we limit ourselves, and the scarcity vs. abundance mentality How acting in line with our purpose energizes us Skip and I briefly discussed the climber featured in Free Solo—you can check him out here: Alex Honnold—as well as Alex's fellow climber Tommy Caldwell.  Learn more about The Book of Mistakes at this website. Skip mentioned the quiz you can take there; here's the direct link. (When I took it, it said I fit with the "Trainer.") Skip's book is available on Amazon (affiliate link). Skip Prichard currently serves as President and CEO of OCLC, and previously was President and CEO of Ingram Content Group, Inc. He is a growth-oriented business leader, turnaround specialist, and keynote speaker. Skip is known for his track record of successfully repositioning companies and dramatically improving results while improving the corporate culture. His views have been featured in print and broadcast media including the BBC, The New York Times, CNN, NPR, The Daily Beast, Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Writer’s Digest, Information Today, The Bookseller, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, and Forbes. He is also an Inc. Top 100 Leadership Speaker. For more information, please visit his website and follow him on Twitter. What is the surest path to success and contentment in life, and what are the mistakes to avoid along the way? My guest this week is Skip Prichard, who has thought a lot about these questions. He's distilled his insights into his Wall Street Journal bes... What is the surest path to success and contentment in life, and what are the mistakes to avoid along the way? My guest this week is Skip Prichard, who has thought a lot about these questions. He's distilled his insights into his Wall Street Journal bestselling book, The Book of Mistakes: 9 Secrets to Creating a Successful Future.<br /> <br /> We explored some of the nine secrets as we discussed his book,  and the many benefits of avoiding these mistakes. Topics we explored included:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Why some people are wildly successful and others are struggling<br /> The author’s takeaways from observing or interviewing over 1000 people<br /> The power of storytelling to convey important principles<br /> The problem with following someone else’s dream<br /> The value of learning crucial lessons as early in life as possible<br /> The role of struggle and mistakes in our growth<br /> How to live your dream while working for someone else<br /> What holds us back from authoring our own lives<br /> Our tendency to drift through our lives, and then wonder, “How did I get here?”<br /> Placing blame rather than taking personal responsibility<br /> The downsides of surrounding ourselves with people who encourage our excuses<br /> Why we limit ourselves, and the scarcity vs. abundance mentality<br /> How acting in line with our purpose energizes us<br /> <br /> Skip and I briefly discussed the climber featured in Free Solo—you can check him out here: Alex Honnold—as well as Alex's fellow climber Tommy Caldwell. <br /> <br /> Learn more about The Book of Mistakes at this website. Skip mentioned the quiz you can take there; here's the direct link. (When I took it, it said I fit with the "Trainer.")<br /> <br /> Skip's book is available on Amazon (affiliate link).<br /> <br /> Skip Prichard currently serves as President and CEO of OCLC, and previously was President and CEO of Ingram Content Group, Inc. He is a growth-oriented business leader, turnaround specialist, and keynote speaker.<br /> <br /> Skip is known for his track record of successfully repositioning companies and dramatically improving results while improving the corporate culture. His views have been featured in print and broadcast media including the BBC, The New York Times, CNN, NPR, The Daily Beast, Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Writer’s Digest, Information Today, The Bookseller, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, and Forbes. He is also an Inc. Top 100 Leadership Speaker.<br /> <br /> For more information, please visit his website and follow him on Twitter. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 49:40 Ep. 40: Dr. Sharon Prentice — Finding New Life through a Shared Death Experience http://sethgillihan.com/ep-40-dr-sharon-prentice-finding-new-life-through-a-shared-death-experience/ Wed, 01 May 2019 10:30:42 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14147 You're probably familiar with "near death experiences," in which people seem to visit the afterlife and then return to life. My guest this week is Dr. Sharon Prentice, who describes a related journey called a "shared death experience." This was a new concept for me, as I'm sure it will be for a lot of listeners, and made for a really fascinating discussion. Sharon also described the events in her life that laid the foundation for her shared death experience, and the ways it changed her understanding of the divine and what it means to die—and to live. Other topics we touched on from her book Becoming Starlight: A Shared Death Journey from Darkness to Light included: The author’s deep sorrow following multiple losses How life can beckon us back when we think we’re “done” Sharon's husband’s illness and gradual decline What a shared death experience (SDE) is Dreams of death The difficulty in putting an SDE into words The merger between life and death during an SDE Her mental and emotional state leading up to the SDE What happened during her SDE The effects of Sharon’s SDE on her subsequent emotions and beliefs How the SDE changed her relationship with and view of God What it means to be a “thought of God” The illusion of separateness from God How her SDE took away the fear of death The question of divine judgment after death Hell as the separation we create from God Here's the link to Sharon's book: Becoming Starlight. For more on shared death experiences, see this book by Raymond Moody, MD: Glimpses of Eternity. (A percentage of each sale from these affiliate links will go toward supporting the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)  Sharon Prentice, PhD, is in private practice as a Licensed Clinical Pastoral Counselor-Advanced Certification. She is also a Certified Spiritual Counselor (SC-C) and a Board Certified Temperament Counselor, and holds certificates in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Group Therapy, Integrated Marriage and Family Therapy, and Crisis and Abuse Therapy. Sharon is a professional member of the American Counselors Association, a professional clinical member of the National Christian Counselors Association, a clinical member of the American Mental Health Counselors Association, and a Presidential member of the American Association of Christian Counselors. She is also a commissioned minister of pastoral care. Find Sharon at her website and on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. You can also reach her by email. You're probably familiar with "near death experiences," in which people seem to visit the afterlife and then return to life. My guest this week is Dr. Sharon Prentice, who describes a related journey called a "shared death experience. You're probably familiar with "near death experiences," in which people seem to visit the afterlife and then return to life. My guest this week is Dr. Sharon Prentice, who describes a related journey called a "shared death experience." This was a new concept for me, as I'm sure it will be for a lot of listeners, and made for a really fascinating discussion.<br /> <br /> Sharon also described the events in her life that laid the foundation for her shared death experience, and the ways it changed her understanding of the divine and what it means to die—and to live. Other topics we touched on from her book Becoming Starlight: A Shared Death Journey from Darkness to Light included:<br /> <br /> The author’s deep sorrow following multiple losses<br /> How life can beckon us back when we think we’re “done”<br /> Sharon's husband’s illness and gradual decline<br /> What a shared death experience (SDE) is<br /> Dreams of death<br /> The difficulty in putting an SDE into words<br /> The merger between life and death during an SDE<br /> Her mental and emotional state leading up to the SDE<br /> What happened during her SDE<br /> The effects of Sharon’s SDE on her subsequent emotions and beliefs<br /> How the SDE changed her relationship with and view of God<br /> What it means to be a “thought of God”<br /> The illusion of separateness from God<br /> How her SDE took away the fear of death<br /> The question of divine judgment after death<br /> Hell as the separation we create from God<br /> <br /> Here's the link to Sharon's book: Becoming Starlight.<br /> <br /> For more on shared death experiences, see this book by Raymond Moody, MD: Glimpses of Eternity. (A percentage of each sale from these affiliate links will go toward supporting the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) <br /> <br /> Sharon Prentice, PhD, is in private practice as a Licensed Clinical Pastoral Counselor-Advanced Certification. She is also a Certified Spiritual Counselor (SC-C) and a Board Certified Temperament Counselor, and holds certificates in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Group Therapy, Integrated Marriage and Family Therapy, and Crisis and Abuse Therapy.<br /> <br /> Sharon is a professional member of the American Counselors Association, a professional clinical member of the National Christian Counselors Association, a clinical member of the American Mental Health Counselors Association, and a Presidential member of the American Association of Christian Counselors. She is also a commissioned minister of pastoral care.<br /> <br /> Find Sharon at her website and on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. You can also reach her by email. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:00:59 Ep. 39: Dr. Ross Greene — A Better Way to Help Kids Solve Problems http://sethgillihan.com/ep-39-dr-ross-greene-a-better-way-to-help-kids-solve-problems/ Wed, 24 Apr 2019 10:30:16 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14134 My guest this week is psychologist and author Dr. Ross Greene. Ross encourages parents to let go of unhelpful efforts to help kids who aren't meeting our expectations, such as punishment and other parent-imposed solutions. His approach focuses instead on solving problems collaboratively with our children, using a straightforward three-step method. Topics we explored together included: The importance of the lens through which we view children The belief that “Kids do well if they wanna” vs. “Kids do well if they can” The danger of missing important information about our kids by jumping to adult-imposed consequences The advantages of asking the child what’s getting in the way of meeting an expectation The messages we inadvertently give kids when we don’t take the time to listen What all kids need from their parents Good parenting as knowing and being responsive to the child’s goals, preferences, and skills “Problem behaviors” vs. “Unsolved problems” The paradox of having less control over kids by trying to impose one’s will Ross's Collaborative and Proactive Solutions approach The advantage of solving problems proactively rather than in the heat of the moment How to address parental concerns with your child Collaborating with your child to develop solutions for unsolved problems The downsides of quickly jumping to a “life lesson” with our kids The cost of being busy on having time to solve problems collaboratively Ross mentioned Tony Wagner’s books, which you can check out on Tony's Amazon page. His most popular books include Most Likely to Succeed and The Global Achievement Gap.  The book Ross and I focused on is available here: Raising Human Beings; he's written other books, including The Explosive Child and Lost and Found. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Ross W. Greene, PhD, is adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Virginia Tech and adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Science at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia. He served on the Harvard Medical School faculty for over 20 years. He completed his PhD in clinical psychology with Dr. Tom Ollendick, a distinguished professor and director of the Child Study Center at Virginia Tech. Ross founded a not-for-profit organization called Lives in the Balance, which aims to disseminate his Collaborative and Proactive Solutions model through free web-based programming and to support and advocate on behalf of behaviorally challenging kids and their parents, teachers, and other caregivers. He was the executive producer and developer of the film “The Kids We Lose,” which won the Best Feature Documentary Award at the 2018 New Hampshire Film Festival, at the 2019 Women’s Film Festival in Philadelphia, and at the 2019 Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival. Ross consults extensively to families, general and special education schools, inpatient and residential facilities, and systems of juvenile detention. He lectures widely throughout the world and has received research funding from the Stanley Research Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the US Department of Education, and the Maine Juvenile Justice Advisory Group. His media appearances include The Oprah Show, Good Morning America, Dateline NBC, the CBS Morning Show, and National Public Radio, and his work has been featured in The Atlantic, Mother Jones Magazine, and The Washington Post. Find Ross online at his Lives in the Balance website. My guest this week is psychologist and author Dr. Ross Greene. Ross encourages parents to let go of unhelpful efforts to help kids who aren't meeting our expectations, such as punishment and other parent-imposed solutions. My guest this week is psychologist and author Dr. Ross Greene. Ross encourages parents to let go of unhelpful efforts to help kids who aren't meeting our expectations, such as punishment and other parent-imposed solutions. His approach focuses instead on solving problems collaboratively with our children, using a straightforward three-step method. Topics we explored together included:<br /> <br /> The importance of the lens through which we view children<br /> The belief that “Kids do well if they wanna” vs. “Kids do well if they can”<br /> The danger of missing important information about our kids by jumping to adult-imposed consequences<br /> The advantages of asking the child what’s getting in the way of meeting an expectation<br /> The messages we inadvertently give kids when we don’t take the time to listen<br /> What all kids need from their parents<br /> Good parenting as knowing and being responsive to the child’s goals, preferences, and skills<br /> “Problem behaviors” vs. “Unsolved problems”<br /> The paradox of having less control over kids by trying to impose one’s will<br /> Ross's Collaborative and Proactive Solutions approach<br /> The advantage of solving problems proactively rather than in the heat of the moment<br /> How to address parental concerns with your child<br /> Collaborating with your child to develop solutions for unsolved problems<br /> The downsides of quickly jumping to a “life lesson” with our kids<br /> The cost of being busy on having time to solve problems collaboratively<br /> <br /> Ross mentioned Tony Wagner’s books, which you can check out on Tony's Amazon page. His most popular books include Most Likely to Succeed and The Global Achievement Gap. <br /> <br /> The book Ross and I focused on is available here: Raising Human Beings; he's written other books, including The Explosive Child and Lost and Found. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Ross W. Greene, PhD, is adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Virginia Tech and adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Science at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia. He served on the Harvard Medical School faculty for over 20 years. He completed his PhD in clinical psychology with Dr. Tom Ollendick, a distinguished professor and director of the Child Study Center at Virginia Tech.<br /> <br /> Ross founded a not-for-profit organization called Lives in the Balance, which aims to disseminate his Collaborative and Proactive Solutions model through free web-based programming and to support and advocate on behalf of behaviorally challenging kids and their parents, teachers, and other caregivers.<br /> <br /> He was the executive producer and developer of the film “The Kids We Lose,” which won the Best Feature Documentary Award at the 2018 New Hampshire Film Festival, at the 2019 Women’s Film Festival in Philadelphia, and at the 2019 Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival.<br /> <br /> Ross consults extensively to families, general and special education schools, inpatient and residential facilities, and systems of juvenile detention. He lectures widely throughout the world and has received research funding from the Stanley Research Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the US Department of Education, and the Maine Juvenile Justice Advisory Group. His media appearances include The Oprah Show, Good Morning America, Dateline NBC, the CBS Morning Show, and National Public Radio, and his work has been featured in The Atlantic, Mother Jones Magazine, and The Washington Post.<br /> <br /> Find Ross online at his Lives in the Balance website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 49:08 Ep. 38: Jon Hershfield — How to Find Relief from Unwanted Violent Thoughts in Harm OCD http://sethgillihan.com/ep-38-jon-hershfield-how-to-find-relief-from-unwanted-violent-thoughts-in-harm-ocd/ Wed, 17 Apr 2019 10:30:09 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14121 My guest this week is therapist and OCD specialist Jon Hershfield. Jon is doing an incredible amount of work to improve the lives of those who struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder through his therapy practice, writing, and public talks. In this episode we discussed his excellent new book, Overcoming Harm OCD: Mindfulness and CBT Tools for Coping with Unwanted Violent Thoughts. The form of Harm OCD that the book and our conversation focus on is what I've referred to as "Malevolence OCD," because it involves the fear not just of harming someone, but of being an evil person. (See this related blog post: Am I a Monster?) Topics we covered included: What Harm OCD is, and how it's relatively common The relief in knowing that what one is dealing with is a form of OCD The right treatment for Harm OCD Fears in Harm OCD: violence against others, self-harm, violence against children, and having a violent identity Common compulsions in Harm OCD The problem with trying to prove that obsessive fears are untrue, vs. the power of accepting uncertainty The role of avoidance and compulsive confessing in OCD The triggering effect of news about violent events and #metoo Distinguishing fear of self-harm from desire to harm oneself or others Fear of going insane Learning to live with the “spam email of the mind” False memory OCD What our brain learns from avoidance and reassurance Inhibitory learning versus habituation How Exposure and Response/Ritual prevention (ERP) works The role of mindfulness in OCD treatment Flooding scripts as a way to practice not doing compulsions The possibility of reassurance from exposures Lack of public awareness about Harm OCD Here's the Vice article that Jon mentioned: The Many Obsessions That Can Haunt a Person with OCD. Jon also said he has several blog posts on his website about Harm OCD; here's Part 1 of a series: Harm OCD Part 1. Jon is the co-author of Everyday Mindfulness for OCD and The Mindfulness Workbook for OCD, and author of When a Family Member Has OCD and Overcoming Harm OCD. (A portion of each sale made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Jon Hershfield, MFT, is the director of The OCD and Anxiety Center of Greater Baltimore in Hunt Valley, MD. He specializes in the mindfulness-based and cognitive behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and is licensed in the states of Maryland, Virginia, and California. Jon has authored or co-authored four well-reviewed books on treating OCD. He is a frequent presenter at the annual conferences of both the International OCD Foundation and the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, and a professional contributor to multiple online OCD-related support groups and blogs. Find Jon on his website, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.   If you're struggling with Harm OCD, also consider joining our Malevolence OCD Facebook group. My guest this week is therapist and OCD specialist Jon Hershfield. Jon is doing an incredible amount of work to improve the lives of those who struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder through his therapy practice, writing, and public talks. My guest this week is therapist and OCD specialist Jon Hershfield. Jon is doing an incredible amount of work to improve the lives of those who struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder through his therapy practice, writing, and public talks. In this episode we discussed his excellent new book, Overcoming Harm OCD: Mindfulness and CBT Tools for Coping with Unwanted Violent Thoughts.<br /> <br /> The form of Harm OCD that the book and our conversation focus on is what I've referred to as "Malevolence OCD," because it involves the fear not just of harming someone, but of being an evil person. (See this related blog post: Am I a Monster?) Topics we covered included:<br /> <br /> What Harm OCD is, and how it's relatively common<br /> The relief in knowing that what one is dealing with is a form of OCD<br /> The right treatment for Harm OCD<br /> Fears in Harm OCD: violence against others, self-harm, violence against children, and having a violent identity<br /> Common compulsions in Harm OCD<br /> The problem with trying to prove that obsessive fears are untrue, vs. the power of accepting uncertainty<br /> The role of avoidance and compulsive confessing in OCD<br /> The triggering effect of news about violent events and #metoo<br /> Distinguishing fear of self-harm from desire to harm oneself or others<br /> Fear of going insane<br /> Learning to live with the “spam email of the mind”<br /> False memory OCD<br /> What our brain learns from avoidance and reassurance<br /> Inhibitory learning versus habituation<br /> How Exposure and Response/Ritual prevention (ERP) works<br /> The role of mindfulness in OCD treatment<br /> Flooding scripts as a way to practice not doing compulsions<br /> The possibility of reassurance from exposures<br /> Lack of public awareness about Harm OCD<br /> <br /> Here's the Vice article that Jon mentioned: The Many Obsessions That Can Haunt a Person with OCD.<br /> <br /> Jon also said he has several blog posts on his website about Harm OCD; here's Part 1 of a series: Harm OCD Part 1.<br /> <br /> Jon is the co-author of Everyday Mindfulness for OCD and The Mindfulness Workbook for OCD, and author of When a Family Member Has OCD and Overcoming Harm OCD. (A portion of each sale made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Jon Hershfield, MFT, is the director of The OCD and Anxiety Center of Greater Baltimore in Hunt Valley, MD. He specializes in the mindfulness-based and cognitive behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and is licensed in the states of Maryland, Virginia, and California.<br /> <br /> Jon has authored or co-authored four well-reviewed books on treating OCD. He is a frequent presenter at the annual conferences of both the International OCD Foundation and the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, and a professional contributor to multiple online OCD-related support groups and blogs.<br /> <br /> Find Jon on his website, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> If you're struggling with Harm OCD, also consider joining our Malevolence OCD Facebook group. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 53:53 Ep. 37: Oren Jay Sofer — How to Improve Your Relationships with Better Communication http://sethgillihan.com/ep-37-oren-jay-sofer-how-to-improve-your-relationships-better-communication/ Wed, 10 Apr 2019 10:30:50 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14104 Do you ever feel like you and someone else—a romantic partner, family member, friend, co-worker, or someone else—just aren't hearing each other? Our relationships will never be better than the quality of our communication. My guest this week is Oren Jay Sofer, who is passionate about helping people to improve their communication abilities through what he describes as a mindful approach to nonviolent communication. Topics that Oren and I explored in this area included: Why mindful presence is essential for communication How to foster presence amid constant distractions Mindfulness as balanced, clear awareness The effect of mindful presence on relationships Violence as any avoidable impairment of fundamental human needs Meeting needs as the primary intention of nonviolent communication How Marshall Rosenberg developed nonviolent communication The link between language and our willingness to enact violence on others The humanizing power of recognizing deeper needs that underlie apparent disagreement The need for inner silence in order to truly listen The fear that holds us back from really hearing another person The need for practice to make new communication strategies sound natural Needs as the link between events and emotions Here's a link to the case study that Oren described in which the Minnesota state legislature transcended party divisions to pass effective child custody legislature. His book is available for purchase on Amazon and elsewhere: Say What You Mean: A Mindful Approach to Nonviolent Communication. (A portion of each purchase made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Oren Jay Sofer leads retreats and workshops on mindful communication at meditation centers and educational settings around the United States. A graduate of the IMS-Spirit Rock Teacher Training Program, he holds a degree in Comparative Religion from Columbia University, teaches in the Insight Meditation community, and is a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and a Certified Trainer of Nonviolent Communication. Oren creates mindfulness training programs for a number of organizations, including Mindful Schools, Kaiser Permanente, and 10% Happier. He lives in Richmond, California. Find Oren online at his website where you can sign up for his newsletter and receive a free e-book and guided meditation series. Or, text the word "guided" to 44222. Do you ever feel like you and someone else—a romantic partner, family member, friend, co-worker, or someone else—just aren't hearing each other? Our relationships will never be better than the quality of our communication. Do you ever feel like you and someone else—a romantic partner, family member, friend, co-worker, or someone else—just aren't hearing each other? Our relationships will never be better than the quality of our communication. My guest this week is Oren Jay Sofer, who is passionate about helping people to improve their communication abilities through what he describes as a mindful approach to nonviolent communication.<br /> <br /> Topics that Oren and I explored in this area included:<br /> <br /> Why mindful presence is essential for communication<br /> How to foster presence amid constant distractions<br /> Mindfulness as balanced, clear awareness<br /> The effect of mindful presence on relationships<br /> Violence as any avoidable impairment of fundamental human needs<br /> Meeting needs as the primary intention of nonviolent communication<br /> How Marshall Rosenberg developed nonviolent communication<br /> The link between language and our willingness to enact violence on others<br /> The humanizing power of recognizing deeper needs that underlie apparent disagreement<br /> The need for inner silence in order to truly listen<br /> The fear that holds us back from really hearing another person<br /> The need for practice to make new communication strategies sound natural<br /> Needs as the link between events and emotions<br /> <br /> Here's a link to the case study that Oren described in which the Minnesota state legislature transcended party divisions to pass effective child custody legislature.<br /> <br /> His book is available for purchase on Amazon and elsewhere: Say What You Mean: A Mindful Approach to Nonviolent Communication. (A portion of each purchase made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Oren Jay Sofer leads retreats and workshops on mindful communication at meditation centers and educational settings around the United States.<br /> <br /> A graduate of the IMS-Spirit Rock Teacher Training Program, he holds a degree in Comparative Religion from Columbia University, teaches in the Insight Meditation community, and is a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and a Certified Trainer of Nonviolent Communication.<br /> <br /> Oren creates mindfulness training programs for a number of organizations, including Mindful Schools, Kaiser Permanente, and 10% Happier. He lives in Richmond, California.<br /> <br /> Find Oren online at his website where you can sign up for his newsletter and receive a free e-book and guided meditation series. Or, text the word "guided" to 44222. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:04:12 Ep. 36: Charlie Gillihan — How to Survive the Challenges of Medical Training http://sethgillihan.com/ep-36-charlie-gillihan/ Wed, 03 Apr 2019 04:01:33 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14092 My guest this week is Charlie Gillihan, my youngest brother. At the time of this recording, Charlie was a few weeks away from graduating from medical school. I was interested in his take on medical education in the 21st century since he not only went to medical school but is an experienced teacher himself. Charlie was very open about his own experiences in a way that I think will be helpful to many people. It was a great discussion as we explored many issues related to learning, medicine, and stress, including: What medical school should look like in the twenty-first century Evidence-based medical education Fixed vs. growth mindset as learners The brain’s ability to learn even without our conscious effort The challenges of learning in medical school What it takes to get through medical school, vs. what it takes to be a doctor High rates of physician burnout and suicide Mental health training in medical school What to look for in a great primary care doctor The importance of being listened to as a patient How people heal, and how it's not often because of medical treatment Nortin Hadler and the Number Needed to Treat (NNT) measure (see TheNNT.com) How to promote a healthy gut microbiome Charlie referenced the Whipple procedure—here's a link to that if you're interested: Whipple procedure. He also highlighted Pamela Wible's work on physician suicide; here's her TEDMed talk about it: Why Doctors Kill Themselves. Our grandfather whom Charlie mentioned, Dr. Alec Spencer, was a doctor for over 50 years in a small town in eastern Kentucky. Here's a write-up about his life and what made him so beloved by his patients and community: The Doctor Will Hear You Now. Here's more information about the author Vinay Prasad. Charlie referenced his book, Ending Medical Reversal which is available on Amazon. For more from Nortin Hadler, see The Citizen Patient and Worried Sick. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)  Charlie was enthusiastic about a measure called the Number Needed to Treat (NNT), which determines the number of people needed to treat in order to change one outcome for the better. For example, if 100 people get a treatment and 10 show improvement, compared to 9 out of 100 who got the placebo, then the NNT would be 100. That is, for every 100 people treated, one person would show improvement who wouldn't have gotten better without the treatment. The Voltaire quote Charlie cited was, “The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.” Charlie Gillihan was born and raised in Indiana and graduated from Columbia University with a degree in creative writing. After graduation he taught chemistry and other science courses for three years in the New York City public schools. He will graduate from New York University's School of Medicine in May 2019, and will continue his training in NYU's internal medicine residency. Charlie is fluent in Spanish, having spent considerable time in Central and South America, and his bilingualism is often useful in his clinical work. To see what he's up to, find him on Twitter. My guest this week is Charlie Gillihan, my youngest brother. At the time of this recording, Charlie was a few weeks away from graduating from medical school. I was interested in his take on medical education in the 21st century since he not only went t... My guest this week is Charlie Gillihan, my youngest brother. At the time of this recording, Charlie was a few weeks away from graduating from medical school. I was interested in his take on medical education in the 21st century since he not only went to medical school but is an experienced teacher himself.<br /> <br /> Charlie was very open about his own experiences in a way that I think will be helpful to many people. It was a great discussion as we explored many issues related to learning, medicine, and stress, including:<br /> <br /> What medical school should look like in the twenty-first century<br /> Evidence-based medical education<br /> Fixed vs. growth mindset as learners<br /> The brain’s ability to learn even without our conscious effort<br /> The challenges of learning in medical school<br /> What it takes to get through medical school, vs. what it takes to be a doctor<br /> High rates of physician burnout and suicide<br /> Mental health training in medical school<br /> What to look for in a great primary care doctor<br /> The importance of being listened to as a patient<br /> How people heal, and how it's not often because of medical treatment<br /> Nortin Hadler and the Number Needed to Treat (NNT) measure (see TheNNT.com)<br /> How to promote a healthy gut microbiome<br /> <br /> Charlie referenced the Whipple procedure—here's a link to that if you're interested: Whipple procedure.<br /> <br /> He also highlighted Pamela Wible's work on physician suicide; here's her TEDMed talk about it: Why Doctors Kill Themselves.<br /> <br /> Our grandfather whom Charlie mentioned, Dr. Alec Spencer, was a doctor for over 50 years in a small town in eastern Kentucky. Here's a write-up about his life and what made him so beloved by his patients and community: The Doctor Will Hear You Now.<br /> <br /> Here's more information about the author Vinay Prasad. Charlie referenced his book, Ending Medical Reversal which is available on Amazon. For more from Nortin Hadler, see The Citizen Patient and Worried Sick. (A percentage of each purchase made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) <br /> <br /> Charlie was enthusiastic about a measure called the Number Needed to Treat (NNT), which determines the number of people needed to treat in order to change one outcome for the better. For example, if 100 people get a treatment and 10 show improvement, compared to 9 out of 100 who got the placebo, then the NNT would be 100. That is, for every 100 people treated, one person would show improvement who wouldn't have gotten better without the treatment.<br /> <br /> The Voltaire quote Charlie cited was, “The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.”<br /> <br /> Charlie Gillihan was born and raised in Indiana and graduated from Columbia University with a degree in creative writing. After graduation he taught chemistry and other science courses for three years in the New York City public schools.<br /> <br /> He will graduate from New York University's School of Medicine in May 2019, and will continue his training in NYU's internal medicine residency. Charlie is fluent in Spanish, having spent considerable time in Central and South America, and his bilingualism is often useful in his clinical work.<br /> <br /> To see what he's up to, find him on Twitter. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:42:58 Ep. 35: Prof. Mary Jo Salter — The Powerful Effects of Poetry on the Human Spirit http://sethgillihan.com/ep-35-professor-mary-jo-salter-the-powerful-effects-of-poetry-on-the-human-spirit/ Wed, 27 Mar 2019 04:01:00 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14077 My guest this week is highly acclaimed poet Mary Jo Salter, whom Dan Chiasson described as "one of America's most accomplished formalists" in the New York Review of Books. I first met Mary Jo on the day I married her niece, over 22 years ago. Since then I've been fortunate to speak with her on several occasions, and always enjoy our discussions. I'm very pleased to share with you our latest conversation, which focused on the creation and experience of poetry, including: The difficulty in defining poetry The universality of poetry, told from a specific human being's point of view The connection between poetry and dreams The involvement of the unconscious mind in creating poetry The challenge of transforming experience into language What inspires us to create art The unpredictability of writing poetry Being open to the possibility of poetry The difficulty in being objective about one’s own writing The use of Biblical allusion in poetry Why it’s hard to binge read poetry The poet Amy Lowell, author of "To a Friend” The connection of poetry to place Poetry as a way of entering more fully into our moment-to-moment experience The importance of concision and lyricism in poetry The intersection of emotion and poetry Whatever your background in poetry, I encourage you to listen to this episode, as Mary Jo has a gift for making poetry accessible. Mary Jo was kind enough to read some of her poetry, including "Distance" and "Wreckage" from A Kiss in Space (one of my favorite collections), an excerpt from "Another Session" from Open Shutters, and "Little Men" and part of the title poem from The Surveyors. (A percentage of sales through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) As Mary Jo describes in our discussion, "The Surveyors" was inspired by a letter from Matthew Yeager; you can find some of his work here: Matthew Yeager poetry. Photo by Marina Levitskaya Mary Jo Salter is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of eight books of poetry published by Alfred A. Knopf, most recently The Surveyors (2017) and Nothing by Design (2013), as well as a children’s book, The Moon Comes Home (1989). She is an essayist, playwright, and lyricist, whose poems and lyrics have been set to music by Fred Hersch and Caroline Shaw. She is also one of three co-editors of The Norton Anthology of Poetry (6th edition, 2018). To hear Mary Jo read more of her poetry, please visit the PoetryArchive.org. You can find more of her work at PoetryFoundation.org and Poets.org. My guest this week is highly acclaimed poet Mary Jo Salter, whom Dan Chiasson described as "one of America's most accomplished formalists" in the New York Review of Books. I first met Mary Jo on the day I married her niece, over 22 years ago. My guest this week is highly acclaimed poet Mary Jo Salter, whom Dan Chiasson described as "one of America's most accomplished formalists" in the New York Review of Books. I first met Mary Jo on the day I married her niece, over 22 years ago. Since then I've been fortunate to speak with her on several occasions, and always enjoy our discussions. I'm very pleased to share with you our latest conversation, which focused on the creation and experience of poetry, including:<br /> <br /> The difficulty in defining poetry<br /> The universality of poetry, told from a specific human being's point of view<br /> The connection between poetry and dreams<br /> The involvement of the unconscious mind in creating poetry<br /> The challenge of transforming experience into language<br /> What inspires us to create art<br /> The unpredictability of writing poetry<br /> Being open to the possibility of poetry<br /> The difficulty in being objective about one’s own writing<br /> The use of Biblical allusion in poetry<br /> Why it’s hard to binge read poetry<br /> The poet Amy Lowell, author of "To a Friend”<br /> The connection of poetry to place<br /> Poetry as a way of entering more fully into our moment-to-moment experience<br /> The importance of concision and lyricism in poetry<br /> The intersection of emotion and poetry<br /> <br /> Whatever your background in poetry, I encourage you to listen to this episode, as Mary Jo has a gift for making poetry accessible.<br /> <br /> Mary Jo was kind enough to read some of her poetry, including "Distance" and "Wreckage" from A Kiss in Space (one of my favorite collections), an excerpt from "Another Session" from Open Shutters, and "Little Men" and part of the title poem from The Surveyors. (A percentage of sales through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> As Mary Jo describes in our discussion, "The Surveyors" was inspired by a letter from Matthew Yeager; you can find some of his work here: Matthew Yeager poetry.<br /> <br /> Photo by Marina Levitskaya<br /> <br /> Mary Jo Salter is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of eight books of poetry published by Alfred A. Knopf, most recently The Surveyors (2017) and Nothing by Design (2013), as well as a children’s book, The Moon Comes Home (1989).<br /> <br /> She is an essayist, playwright, and lyricist, whose poems and lyrics have been set to music by Fred Hersch and Caroline Shaw. She is also one of three co-editors of The Norton Anthology of Poetry (6th edition, 2018).<br /> <br /> To hear Mary Jo read more of her poetry, please visit the PoetryArchive.org. You can find more of her work at PoetryFoundation.org and Poets.org. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:21:08 Ep. 34: Jonni Pollard — How to Experience Life as a Sacred Expression of Love http://sethgillihan.com/how-to-experience-life-as-a-sacred-expression-of-love/ Wed, 20 Mar 2019 04:01:55 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14050 My guest this week focuses on the big questions of our existence: Who are we? Why are we here? And how can we experience fulfillment? Jonni Pollard describes his inspiring view of our true identity and purpose in his recent book, The Golden Sequence: A Manual for Reclaiming Our Humanity. I loved this book, and strongly recommend you get a copy. As we discussed, The Golden Sequence is not just inspiring, but is highly practical, offering a straightforward plan—the sequence—for remembering who we are, and living in line with our deepest nature. Click this link to find it on Amazon. (A percentage of sales through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) I greatly enjoyed this conversation, in which we covered many fascinating topics, including: The inherent divisiveness of our current political reality Conflict between the teaching of scriptures and the practices of some religious communities The human longing to belong The deep awareness that something in life is missing The problem of defining ourselves through disconnection from others The exacerbating effect of struggling against our discomfort The healing that's possible by moving through our pain Overcoming the propaganda of fear and other painful emotions Reconnecting with the powerful truth of who we are and why we’re here The fundamental sacredness of life The anxiety and pain that come with disconnection from our true nature Living in a way that honors each other and the sacredness of life Ignorance as the most powerful force in the universe What leads us to avoid meditation and other experiences of deep awareness The mismatch between our design and our current environment Fulfillment as an expression of our nature How to experience more grace in our lives Why our enthusiasm for our passions often flags when it's fueled only by self-gain Humor as a reminder of the lightness in life Finding our purpose through unfulfilled needs in the world Giving and receiving love as the fulfillment of human purpose The need for pragmatic tools to apply the principles of mindfulness A brief guided meditation that illustrates his approach to meditation training Jonni Pollard is best known for bringing meditation to the mainstream through his organization, 1 Giant Mind, and its Learn to Meditate smartphone app. As one of the top rated meditation apps, 1 Giant Mind has taught hundreds of thousands of people worldwide how to meditate for free. Jonni is recognized for leading mass meditations at some of the world’s biggest lifestyle events and festivals (Wanderlust, Lightning in a Bottle, The Big Quiet). He also teaches private meditation and personal development for entrepreneurs, CEOs, celebrities, political leaders, and wellness experts across yoga and meditation. Born and raised in Australia, Jonni has lived in Los Angeles and India, and now currently resides in New York City. Connect with Jonni on Facebook and Instagram (where you'll see that he clearly loves being a dad), and visit his website and 1 Giant Mind. My guest this week focuses on the big questions of our existence: Who are we? Why are we here? And how can we experience fulfillment? Jonni Pollard describes his inspiring view of our true identity and purpose in his recent book, My guest this week focuses on the big questions of our existence: Who are we? Why are we here? And how can we experience fulfillment? Jonni Pollard describes his inspiring view of our true identity and purpose in his recent book, The Golden Sequence: A Manual for Reclaiming Our Humanity.<br /> <br /> I loved this book, and strongly recommend you get a copy. As we discussed, The Golden Sequence is not just inspiring, but is highly practical, offering a straightforward plan—the sequence—for remembering who we are, and living in line with our deepest nature. Click this link to find it on Amazon. (A percentage of sales through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> I greatly enjoyed this conversation, in which we covered many fascinating topics, including:<br /> <br /> The inherent divisiveness of our current political reality<br /> Conflict between the teaching of scriptures and the practices of some religious communities<br /> The human longing to belong<br /> The deep awareness that something in life is missing<br /> The problem of defining ourselves through disconnection from others<br /> The exacerbating effect of struggling against our discomfort<br /> The healing that's possible by moving through our pain<br /> Overcoming the propaganda of fear and other painful emotions<br /> Reconnecting with the powerful truth of who we are and why we’re here<br /> The fundamental sacredness of life<br /> The anxiety and pain that come with disconnection from our true nature<br /> Living in a way that honors each other and the sacredness of life<br /> Ignorance as the most powerful force in the universe<br /> What leads us to avoid meditation and other experiences of deep awareness<br /> The mismatch between our design and our current environment<br /> Fulfillment as an expression of our nature<br /> How to experience more grace in our lives<br /> Why our enthusiasm for our passions often flags when it's fueled only by self-gain<br /> Humor as a reminder of the lightness in life<br /> Finding our purpose through unfulfilled needs in the world<br /> Giving and receiving love as the fulfillment of human purpose<br /> The need for pragmatic tools to apply the principles of mindfulness<br /> A brief guided meditation that illustrates his approach to meditation training<br /> <br /> Jonni Pollard is best known for bringing meditation to the mainstream through his organization, 1 Giant Mind, and its Learn to Meditate smartphone app. As one of the top rated meditation apps, 1 Giant Mind has taught hundreds of thousands of people worldwide how to meditate for free.<br /> <br /> Jonni is recognized for leading mass meditations at some of the world’s biggest lifestyle events and festivals (Wanderlust, Lightning in a Bottle, The Big Quiet). He also teaches private meditation and personal development for entrepreneurs, CEOs, celebrities, political leaders, and wellness experts across yoga and meditation.<br /> <br /> Born and raised in Australia, Jonni has lived in Los Angeles and India, and now currently resides in New York City. Connect with Jonni on Facebook and Instagram (where you'll see that he clearly loves being a dad), and visit his website and 1 Giant Mind. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:52:05 Ep. 33: Dr. James Kelley — Adversity as a Pathway to Personal Growth http://sethgillihan.com/ep-33-dr-james-kelley-adversity-as-a-pathway-to-personal-growth/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 04:01:40 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14036 In this week's episode, I discussed with Dr. James Kelley the sometimes surprising effects of adversity—what James calls the "crucible's gift." Life's challenges may offer the opportunity to grow in strength and compassion, ultimately allowing us to become the person we were meant to be.  James and I explored topics including: What it means to be authentic What authentic leadership is, and what inauthentic leadership looks like Helping oneself by helping others Compassion and integrity as parts of our inherent nature Reasons we hide our true selves The discomfort of vulnerability How passions are related to authenticity The connection between adversity and authenticity Seeing adversity as something that happens “for me” vs. “to me” Developing compassion through adversity Growth vs. fixed mindset Developing resilience through the experience of adversity The importance of honesty for relationships Helpful vs. unhelpful honesty How to create micro moments of meaning The ripple effects of positive interactions Why some companies foster an unhealthy and demoralizing work environment James B. Kelley, PhD, is an international leadership author, TedX speaker, culture transformation expert, and entrepreneur. He has spent the last 15 years working in various organizations across four continents. In his recent book, The Crucible’s Gift: 5 Lessons from Authentic Leaders Who Thrive in Adversity, James interviewed over 140 executives, from Fortune Two companies to entrepreneurs, to explore best practices for leading organizations. (A percentage of each sale made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, as no additional cost to you.) James is also the founder and owner of qChange, which specializes in creating positive nudges at the point of choice, and of the Behavioral Internet of Things company. James is certified by Flourishing Leadership Institute in large group facilitation using the research-based approach of Appreciative Inquiry. Find James online at his website. In this week's episode, I discussed with Dr. James Kelley the sometimes surprising effects of adversity—what James calls the "crucible's gift." Life's challenges may offer the opportunity to grow in strength and compassion, In this week's episode, I discussed with Dr. James Kelley the sometimes surprising effects of adversity—what James calls the "crucible's gift." Life's challenges may offer the opportunity to grow in strength and compassion, ultimately allowing us to become the person we were meant to be. <br /> James and I explored topics including:<br /> <br /> What it means to be authentic<br /> What authentic leadership is, and what inauthentic leadership looks like<br /> Helping oneself by helping others<br /> Compassion and integrity as parts of our inherent nature<br /> Reasons we hide our true selves<br /> The discomfort of vulnerability<br /> How passions are related to authenticity<br /> The connection between adversity and authenticity<br /> Seeing adversity as something that happens “for me” vs. “to me”<br /> Developing compassion through adversity<br /> Growth vs. fixed mindset<br /> Developing resilience through the experience of adversity<br /> The importance of honesty for relationships<br /> Helpful vs. unhelpful honesty<br /> How to create micro moments of meaning<br /> The ripple effects of positive interactions<br /> Why some companies foster an unhealthy and demoralizing work environment<br /> <br /> James B. Kelley, PhD, is an international leadership author, TedX speaker, culture transformation expert, and entrepreneur. He has spent the last 15 years working in various organizations across four continents. In his recent book, The Crucible’s Gift: 5 Lessons from Authentic Leaders Who Thrive in Adversity, James interviewed over 140 executives, from Fortune Two companies to entrepreneurs, to explore best practices for leading organizations. (A percentage of each sale made through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, as no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> James is also the founder and owner of qChange, which specializes in creating positive nudges at the point of choice, and of the Behavioral Internet of Things company. James is certified by Flourishing Leadership Institute in large group facilitation using the research-based approach of Appreciative Inquiry.<br /> <br /> Find James online at his website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:02:40 Ep. 32: Dr. Mark Powers — The Best Tested Ways to Treat Anxiety and Trauma http://sethgillihan.com/ep-32-dr-mark-powers-the-best-tested-ways-to-treat-anxiety-and-trauma/ Wed, 06 Mar 2019 05:01:43 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14021 Countless individuals experience debilitating anxiety or major trauma that can lead to conditions like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Mark Powers, who specializes in research on the treatment of anxiety and PTSD. I've always respected Mark's rich training on these conditions and his knowledge of the research findings, which he shares in this episode. We touched on topics including: The definition of trauma The similarity of symptoms across different types of trauma (e.g., combat, physical assault, natural disaster) How the diagnosis of PTSD was developed The advantages and disadvantages of defining what “counts” as a PTSD-type trauma Variations in treatment required for treating complex PTSD Common physical, mental, and emotional responses to trauma The high prevalence of trauma at some point in a person’s life Our need to make sense of our experiences, and the difficulty in processing traumatic events The difference between stress and anxiety The positive side of stress How the body can get stuck in the stress response Importance of education about trauma reactions in treatment The challenge of interpersonal trauma The effectiveness of exposure treatment in decreasing fear and changing our thoughts The importance of personal agency during exposure treatment Similarities and differences between anxiety treatment and PTSD treatment Experimental models of PTSD Cognitive processing therapy, Prolonged Exposure, and EMDR The therapeutic effect of telling the story of one’s trauma The therapeutic effects of exercise and vagus nerve stimulation Mark B. Powers, PhD, is the Director of Trauma Research at Baylor Scott & White Health, running federally funded projects at two Level 1 Trauma Centers. He is also conducting research on pain reduction and virtual reality at Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of Texas. In addition to conducting research, Mark is a licensed clinical psychologist. He completed his PhD in clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, and a pre-doctoral fellowship at Boston University and Harvard Medical School. Mark was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Amsterdam for two years studying exposure augmentation strategies, followed by a position an Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (where Mark and I met), focusing on research in OCD and PTSD. He then joined the faculty  at Southern Methodist University before moving to the University of Texas at Austin. Mark is currently the Chair of the APA Division 12 Presidential Task Force on Empirically Supported Treatment Dissemination, and is a member of the Scientific Council at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. He conducts international workshops in ERP for OCD and PE for PTSD. Mark is prolific in his research output, with over 150 publications. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Some of Mark's most-cited research studies include: A meta-analytic review of prolonged exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder Exercise interventions for mental health: A quantitative and qualitative review Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A meta-analytic review Cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis of treatment outcome and moderators Find Mark online at Baylor's website as well as through Google Scholar. Countless individuals experience debilitating anxiety or major trauma that can lead to conditions like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Mark Powers, who specializes in research on the treatment of anxiety and... Countless individuals experience debilitating anxiety or major trauma that can lead to conditions like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Mark Powers, who specializes in research on the treatment of anxiety and PTSD. I've always respected Mark's rich training on these conditions and his knowledge of the research findings, which he shares in this episode.<br /> <br /> We touched on topics including:<br /> <br /> The definition of trauma<br /> The similarity of symptoms across different types of trauma (e.g., combat, physical assault, natural disaster)<br /> How the diagnosis of PTSD was developed<br /> The advantages and disadvantages of defining what “counts” as a PTSD-type trauma<br /> Variations in treatment required for treating complex PTSD<br /> Common physical, mental, and emotional responses to trauma<br /> The high prevalence of trauma at some point in a person’s life<br /> Our need to make sense of our experiences, and the difficulty in processing traumatic events<br /> The difference between stress and anxiety<br /> The positive side of stress<br /> How the body can get stuck in the stress response<br /> Importance of education about trauma reactions in treatment<br /> The challenge of interpersonal trauma<br /> The effectiveness of exposure treatment in decreasing fear and changing our thoughts<br /> The importance of personal agency during exposure treatment<br /> Similarities and differences between anxiety treatment and PTSD treatment<br /> Experimental models of PTSD<br /> Cognitive processing therapy, Prolonged Exposure, and EMDR<br /> The therapeutic effect of telling the story of one’s trauma<br /> The therapeutic effects of exercise and vagus nerve stimulation<br /> <br /> Mark B. Powers, PhD, is the Director of Trauma Research at Baylor Scott & White Health, running federally funded projects at two Level 1 Trauma Centers. He is also conducting research on pain reduction and virtual reality at Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of Texas.<br /> In addition to conducting research, Mark is a licensed clinical psychologist. He completed his PhD in clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, and a pre-doctoral fellowship at Boston University and Harvard Medical School.<br /> Mark was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Amsterdam for two years studying exposure augmentation strategies, followed by a position an Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (where Mark and I met), focusing on research in OCD and PTSD. He then joined the faculty  at Southern Methodist University before moving to the University of Texas at Austin.<br /> Mark is currently the Chair of the APA Division 12 Presidential Task Force on Empirically Supported Treatment Dissemination, and is a member of the Scientific Council at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. He conducts international workshops in ERP for OCD and PE for PTSD.<br /> Mark is prolific in his research output, with over 150 publications. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Some of Mark's most-cited research studies include:<br /> A meta-analytic review of prolonged exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder<br /> Exercise interventions for mental health: A quantitative and qualitative review<br /> <br /> Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A meta-analytic review<br /> <br /> Cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis of treatment outcome and moderators<br /> <br /> Find Mark online at Baylor's website as well as through Google Scholar. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:08:08 Ep. 31: Dr. Jodi Mindell — How to Help Your Baby Sleep through the Night http://sethgillihan.com/ep-31-dr-jodi-mindell-how-to-help-your-baby-sleep-through-the-night/ Wed, 27 Feb 2019 05:01:28 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=14007 Most new parents will wish at some point that their baby were sleeping more soundly. Thankfully there are proven techniques for helping young children to sleep through the night. My guest this week is psychologist and pediatric sleep specialist Dr. Jodi Mindell, who has done a tremendous amount of work to bring sound sleep guidance to parents who need it. I've loved Jodi's approach since I first discovered it as a new parent more than 10 years ago. If you've struggled to find hope and answers for your child's sleep, or you're going to start sleep training soon—or you're just curious about the state of the science in this area—this episode is for you. We covered many issues related to babies' sleep, including the nuts and bolts of how and when to implement sleep training. We also covered: The abundance of "parenting experts" and non-science-based opinions about kids’ sleep Supporting parents as experts on their child and their families (vs. parent shaming) Empowering parents to trust their gut and decide for themselves how they want to raise their child What parents should expect for their newborn’s sleep The value of morning light exposure for babies’ sleep The prevalence of sleep problems among young children The effects of kids’ sleep problems on parents, couples, and families Parents’ guilt about doing sleep training Sleep training benefits for a child How often kids wake up in the middle of the night Why daytime napping and earlier bedtimes lead to better sleep for kids younger than 3 years old The importance of morning wakeup time for determining the rest of a child’s sleep schedule Why breastfed babies wake up more during the night The keys to developing good sleep habits The importance of being able to fall asleep independently The many benefits of a good bedtime routine (see this study) What to do when a baby wakes up and can’t seem to fall back asleep How long a child will take to fall asleep during sleep training The downsides of letting a baby cry it out without checking on them Effects of sleep training on child development and attachment (see this study that Jodi referenced; also this one) When sleep training is not recommended The profound effect of better sleep for kids and families Jodi mentioned a fantastic website called BabySleep.com that she and her colleagues developed. It has tons of resources on how to help babies sleep better, with videos and blog posts by a range of pediatric sleep experts. And it's all free! As a parent, my favorite sleep training book was Jodi's Sleeping Through the Night. (A percentage of sales through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) As we discuss in this episode, it has a very warm and supportive tone for parents. It also offers options to adapt sleep training to many parenting styles and preferences, rather than trying to force a one-size-fits-all approach or trying to scare parents into following a narrow and rigid ideology. Jodi Mindell, PhD, is Associate Director of the Sleep Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) where she treats children of all ages. She is also a professor of psychology at Saint Joseph’s University and of pediatrics (psychology) at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Jodi is internationally recognized as one of the world’s leading pediatric sleep researchers. She has written extensively on pediatric sleep disorders with over 150 publications and over 300 presentations at national and international conferences.  She is the author of Sleeping Through the Night: How Infants, Toddlers, and Their Parents Can Get a Good Night’s Sleep, and co-authored A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems as well as Take Charge of Your Child’s Sleep: The All-in-One Resource for Solving Sleep Problems in Kids and Teens (these are also affiliate links). Most new parents will wish at some point that their baby were sleeping more soundly. Thankfully there are proven techniques for helping young children to sleep through the night. My guest this week is psychologist and pediatric sleep specialist Dr. Most new parents will wish at some point that their baby were sleeping more soundly. Thankfully there are proven techniques for helping young children to sleep through the night. My guest this week is psychologist and pediatric sleep specialist Dr. Jodi Mindell, who has done a tremendous amount of work to bring sound sleep guidance to parents who need it.<br /> <br /> I've loved Jodi's approach since I first discovered it as a new parent more than 10 years ago. If you've struggled to find hope and answers for your child's sleep, or you're going to start sleep training soon—or you're just curious about the state of the science in this area—this episode is for you.<br /> <br /> We covered many issues related to babies' sleep, including the nuts and bolts of how and when to implement sleep training. We also covered:<br /> <br /> The abundance of "parenting experts" and non-science-based opinions about kids’ sleep<br /> Supporting parents as experts on their child and their families (vs. parent shaming)<br /> Empowering parents to trust their gut and decide for themselves how they want to raise their child<br /> What parents should expect for their newborn’s sleep<br /> The value of morning light exposure for babies’ sleep<br /> The prevalence of sleep problems among young children<br /> The effects of kids’ sleep problems on parents, couples, and families<br /> Parents’ guilt about doing sleep training<br /> Sleep training benefits for a child<br /> How often kids wake up in the middle of the night<br /> Why daytime napping and earlier bedtimes lead to better sleep for kids younger than 3 years old<br /> The importance of morning wakeup time for determining the rest of a child’s sleep schedule<br /> Why breastfed babies wake up more during the night<br /> The keys to developing good sleep habits<br /> The importance of being able to fall asleep independently<br /> The many benefits of a good bedtime routine (see this study)<br /> What to do when a baby wakes up and can’t seem to fall back asleep<br /> How long a child will take to fall asleep during sleep training<br /> The downsides of letting a baby cry it out without checking on them<br /> Effects of sleep training on child development and attachment (see this study that Jodi referenced; also this one)<br /> When sleep training is not recommended<br /> The profound effect of better sleep for kids and families<br /> <br /> Jodi mentioned a fantastic website called BabySleep.com that she and her colleagues developed. It has tons of resources on how to help babies sleep better, with videos and blog posts by a range of pediatric sleep experts. And it's all free!<br /> <br /> As a parent, my favorite sleep training book was Jodi's Sleeping Through the Night. (A percentage of sales through this affiliate link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) As we discuss in this episode, it has a very warm and supportive tone for parents. It also offers options to adapt sleep training to many parenting styles and preferences, rather than trying to force a one-size-fits-all approach or trying to scare parents into following a narrow and rigid ideology.<br /> <br /> Jodi Mindell, PhD, is Associate Director of the Sleep Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) where she treats children of all ages. She is also a professor of psychology at Saint Joseph’s University and of pediatrics (psychology) at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.<br /> <br /> Jodi is internationally recognized as one of the world’s leading pediatric sleep researchers. She has written extensively on pediatric sleep disorders with over 150 publications and over 300 presentations at national and international conferences.  She is the author of Sleeping Through the Night: How Infants, Toddlers, and Their Parents Can Get a Good Night’s Sleep, and co-authored A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sle... Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 56:07 Ep. 30: Dr. Omid Naim — Telling a Better Story about Health and Healing http://sethgillihan.com/ep-30-dr-omid-naim/ Wed, 20 Feb 2019 05:01:41 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=13989 My guest this week is Dr. Omid Naim, who specializes in integrative psychiatry. I thought I knew what that meant before our conversation, but what I learned was much more inspiring than I could have imagined. We usually think of healing as something that comes from the outside. In Dr. Naim's approach, however, healing comes from within. You'll hear him describe an holistic approach that not only integrates many healing traditions, like medicine, yoga, and talk therapy, but that seeks to integrate mind, body, and spirit. We covered a lot of topics in our discussion, including: The need for novel treatment approaches in psychiatry The work of Peter Levine, author of Waking the Tiger and developer of Somatic Experiencing therapy How trauma gets stuck in the body through the freezing response The effects of chronic stress The effects of having few caregivers in one’s life The many varieties of childhood trauma Our lack of awareness about how radically things are changing The timeless and spaceless realm of smartphone use The rise in mental health challenges around 2013, and the influence of the Internet The importance of disconnecting from productivity on a regular basis The benefits of having periods of reflection to connect with others, nature, and ourselves Staggeringly high rates of mental health diagnoses and psychiatric medication usage Resilience as flexibility and the ability to adapt The “complete ecological approach” in psychiatry Holistic approaches to health and wellness The problem with medical approaches that assume healing comes from outside of you Providing the conditions humans need to thrive Our dual requirements of nourishment and challenge Mindfulness as bringing the mind back to its natural state The role of medication in integrative psychiatry The possibility of complete healing from many psychiatric conditions Medication as supporting innate healing processes Seeing mental illness as an imbalance rather than a deficit Food choices that minimize inflammation and promote healing Meaning and spirituality as the backbone of well-being What leads to major, lasting change Why serial self-help can be so unhelpful Coming back to a morning ritual that aligns intention with a mind-body practice Positive psychiatry and resilience How science could become a wisdom tradition How ideas of who we need to be can keep us stuck in traumatic experiences What drives people to integrative medicine practitioners The integrative model at Dr. Naim's La Maida Institute Dr. Naim believes that an integrative approach is the future of medicine, and I agree with him. I look forward to hearing what you think. Dr. Naim has a very interesting story, and I'm going to let him tell it: "I was born in Tehran, Iran, and moved to Los Angeles with my family just before the Iranian Revolution in 1978. This early childhood experience of trauma shaped my life and appreciation of how trauma can take shape in an individual and family, and how easily it gets neglected as the root cause of so much mental illness in our society. My experience growing up in a large interdependent family also informed me as a psychiatrist as to the foundational role of community in our health as a society, the process of healing, and as a protective mechanism for preventing disability with my clients today. "I grew up in Los Angeles and stayed for medical school at the University of Southern California. After medical school I completed residency training in General Adult Psychiatry as well Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Southern California. My path in psychiatry was devoted to community mental health where I started working with with the most severely ill population of children and young adults in a program designed for 'high risk youth' at Edgewood Center for Children & Families in San Mateo, Calilfornia, My guest this week is Dr. Omid Naim, who specializes in integrative psychiatry. I thought I knew what that meant before our conversation, but what I learned was much more inspiring than I could have imagined. - My guest this week is Dr. Omid Naim, who specializes in integrative psychiatry. I thought I knew what that meant before our conversation, but what I learned was much more inspiring than I could have imagined.<br /> <br /> We usually think of healing as something that comes from the outside. In Dr. Naim's approach, however, healing comes from within. You'll hear him describe an holistic approach that not only integrates many healing traditions, like medicine, yoga, and talk therapy, but that seeks to integrate mind, body, and spirit.<br /> <br /> We covered a lot of topics in our discussion, including:<br /> <br /> The need for novel treatment approaches in psychiatry<br /> The work of Peter Levine, author of Waking the Tiger and developer of Somatic Experiencing therapy<br /> How trauma gets stuck in the body through the freezing response<br /> The effects of chronic stress<br /> The effects of having few caregivers in one’s life<br /> The many varieties of childhood trauma<br /> Our lack of awareness about how radically things are changing<br /> The timeless and spaceless realm of smartphone use<br /> The rise in mental health challenges around 2013, and the influence of the Internet<br /> The importance of disconnecting from productivity on a regular basis<br /> The benefits of having periods of reflection to connect with others, nature, and ourselves<br /> Staggeringly high rates of mental health diagnoses and psychiatric medication usage<br /> Resilience as flexibility and the ability to adapt<br /> The “complete ecological approach” in psychiatry<br /> Holistic approaches to health and wellness<br /> The problem with medical approaches that assume healing comes from outside of you<br /> Providing the conditions humans need to thrive<br /> Our dual requirements of nourishment and challenge<br /> Mindfulness as bringing the mind back to its natural state<br /> The role of medication in integrative psychiatry<br /> The possibility of complete healing from many psychiatric conditions<br /> Medication as supporting innate healing processes<br /> Seeing mental illness as an imbalance rather than a deficit<br /> Food choices that minimize inflammation and promote healing<br /> Meaning and spirituality as the backbone of well-being<br /> What leads to major, lasting change<br /> Why serial self-help can be so unhelpful<br /> Coming back to a morning ritual that aligns intention with a mind-body practice<br /> Positive psychiatry and resilience<br /> How science could become a wisdom tradition<br /> How ideas of who we need to be can keep us stuck in traumatic experiences<br /> What drives people to integrative medicine practitioners<br /> The integrative model at Dr. Naim's La Maida Institute<br /> <br /> Dr. Naim believes that an integrative approach is the future of medicine, and I agree with him. I look forward to hearing what you think.<br /> <br /> <br /> Dr. Naim has a very interesting story, and I'm going to let him tell it:<br /> "I was born in Tehran, Iran, and moved to Los Angeles with my family just before the Iranian Revolution in 1978. This early childhood experience of trauma shaped my life and appreciation of how trauma can take shape in an individual and family, and how easily it gets neglected as the root cause of so much mental illness in our society. My experience growing up in a large interdependent family also informed me as a psychiatrist as to the foundational role of community in our health as a society, the process of healing, and as a protective mechanism for preventing disability with my clients today.<br /> "I grew up in Los Angeles and stayed for medical school at the University of Southern California. After medical school I completed residency training in General Adult Psychiatry as well Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Southern California. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:20:48 Ep. 29: Dr. Julia Rucklidge — Can Nutrition Prevent Depression and Promote Resilience? http://sethgillihan.com/ep-29-dr-julia-rucklidge-can-nutrition-prevent-depression-and-promote-resilience/ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 05:01:16 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=13971  Psychologist Julia Rucklidge was disturbed by two trends she observed: Psychological conditions like depression and anxiety were becoming more and more common. At the same time, rates of prescription medication use for anxiety and depression were extraordinarily high. Something didn't add up—if drugs were helping, why did the rates of illness keep increasing? Clearly current treatment approaches were failing countless individuals. In this week's episode I spoke with Julia about the need for more effective treatments for common psychological conditions. We focused on her area of specialty, the cutting edge of nutritional psychiatry. We discussed many important topics in this area, including: The lack of average long-term improvement associated with medication use The impact of stigma on treatment development for psychiatric conditions The need for more widely available treatments The effect of habitual diet on depression Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet on mental health Problems with the Standard American Diet (SAD) The SMILES trial in Australia, showing that better diet can help significantly with depression Replication of the SMILES findings by Parletta and colleagues Lack of training in the role of nutrition in mental health The effects of micronutrients on stress resilience Benefits of micronutrients on insomnia The limitations of recommended daily allowances (RDAs) for vitamins and minerals The importance of researcher independence in clinical trials Possible ways that micronutrients have their beneficial effects The role of nutrients in turning genes on and off Possible effects of nutrients on the microbiome (bacteria in the gut) and inflammation Resistance to the possible role of nutrition in mental health The pioneering work of Dr. Bonnie Kaplan Difficulty in getting funding for nutritional psychiatry research, and difficulty publishing Single nutrient vs. broad spectrum studies The frontier of nutritional psychiatry Potential advantages of more personalized treatment approaches If you're curious about the contents of the supplements used in Julia's studies, I've included a label showing the ingredients for EMPowerplus, which is one of the formulations the researchers have used. Please note, as Julia did, that she is not paid by the supplement manufacturers (nor am I)—it's essential that she remain an independent agent, not beholden to her funding sources in a way that could compromise the science. I include this information here only to let you know what was used in the research studies. For more on Julia's research, check out her Google Scholar page with links to her many studies. Julia maintains the Mental Health and Nutrition page on Facebook, where you can follow the latest developments in her field. You can also follow Julia on Twitter and read her blog posts on Mad in America. Julia Rucklidge, PhD, is a Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) and the Director of the Mental Health and Nutrition Research Lab. She completed her PhD at the University of Calgary in clinical psychology followed by a two year post-doctoral Fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Originally from Toronto, Julia immigrated to New Zealand in 2000. Julia's interests in nutrition and mental illness grew out of research showing poor outcomes for individuals with significant psychiatric illness despite receiving conventional treatments for their conditions. In the last decade, she and her lab have been running clinical trials investigating the role of broad-spectrum micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, amino acids) in the treatment of mental illness, specifically mood disorders, anxiety, stress, and ADHD. Julia has over 100 peer-reviewed publications, has given invited talks all over the world on her work on nutrition and mental health,  Psychologist Julia Rucklidge was disturbed by two trends she observed: - Psychological conditions like depression and anxiety were becoming more and more common. - At the same time, rates of prescription medication use for anxiety and depression w... <br /> Psychologist Julia Rucklidge was disturbed by two trends she observed:<br /> <br /> Psychological conditions like depression and anxiety were becoming more and more common.<br /> <br /> At the same time, rates of prescription medication use for anxiety and depression were extraordinarily high.<br /> <br /> Something didn't add up—if drugs were helping, why did the rates of illness keep increasing? Clearly current treatment approaches were failing countless individuals.<br /> <br /> In this week's episode I spoke with Julia about the need for more effective treatments for common psychological conditions. We focused on her area of specialty, the cutting edge of nutritional psychiatry. We discussed many important topics in this area, including:<br /> <br /> The lack of average long-term improvement associated with medication use<br /> The impact of stigma on treatment development for psychiatric conditions<br /> The need for more widely available treatments<br /> The effect of habitual diet on depression<br /> Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet on mental health<br /> Problems with the Standard American Diet (SAD)<br /> The SMILES trial in Australia, showing that better diet can help significantly with depression<br /> Replication of the SMILES findings by Parletta and colleagues<br /> Lack of training in the role of nutrition in mental health<br /> The effects of micronutrients on stress resilience<br /> Benefits of micronutrients on insomnia<br /> The limitations of recommended daily allowances (RDAs) for vitamins and minerals<br /> The importance of researcher independence in clinical trials<br /> Possible ways that micronutrients have their beneficial effects<br /> The role of nutrients in turning genes on and off<br /> Possible effects of nutrients on the microbiome (bacteria in the gut) and inflammation<br /> Resistance to the possible role of nutrition in mental health<br /> The pioneering work of Dr. Bonnie Kaplan<br /> Difficulty in getting funding for nutritional psychiatry research, and difficulty publishing<br /> Single nutrient vs. broad spectrum studies<br /> The frontier of nutritional psychiatry<br /> Potential advantages of more personalized treatment approaches<br /> <br /> If you're curious about the contents of the supplements used in Julia's studies, I've included a label showing the ingredients for EMPowerplus, which is one of the formulations the researchers have used. Please note, as Julia did, that she is not paid by the supplement manufacturers (nor am I)—it's essential that she remain an independent agent, not beholden to her funding sources in a way that could compromise the science. I include this information here only to let you know what was used in the research studies.<br /> <br /> For more on Julia's research, check out her Google Scholar page with links to her many studies.<br /> <br /> Julia maintains the Mental Health and Nutrition page on Facebook, where you can follow the latest developments in her field.<br /> <br /> You can also follow Julia on Twitter and read her blog posts on Mad in America.<br /> <br /> <br /> Julia Rucklidge, PhD, is a Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) and the Director of the Mental Health and Nutrition Research Lab. She completed her PhD at the University of Calgary in clinical psychology followed by a two year post-doctoral Fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Originally from Toronto, Julia immigrated to New Zealand in 2000.<br /> <br /> Julia's interests in nutrition and mental illness grew out of research showing poor outcomes for individuals with significant psychiatric illness despite receiving conventional treatments for their conditions. In the last decade, she and her lab have been running clinical trials investigating the role of broad-spectrum micronutrients (vitam... Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:07:59 Ep. 28: Dr. Mitch Greene — Training the Mind for Better Athletic Performance http://sethgillihan.com/ep-28-dr-mitch-greene-training-the-mind-for-better-athletic-performance/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 05:01:46 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=13955 Anyone who's played competitive sports knows that the mental game is at least as important as the physical one. My guest this week is clinical and sport psychologist Dr. Mitch Greene, who specializes in helping athletes manage doubts, cultivate courage, improve performance, and reach their goals. Mitch and I talked about several key issues in sport psychology, including: How mind games get in the way of a person’s goals Dealing with “mind chatter” Making peace with self doubt Real versus pseudo-confidence Therapists’ own mind chatter Applicability of sport psychology principles to other areas, like academics How to bring one’s focus to the game The impossibility of directly controlling sports outcomes Process versus outcome goals The challenge of holding a lead Dealing with performance anxiety Visualization The influence of parents’ behavior Paths to becoming a sport psychologist Dealing with fears Getting out of our comfort zones Mitch mentioned the Association for Applied Sport Psychology; check out their website. Dr. Mitchell Greene completed his undergraduate degree at Boston College and his PhD in clinical psychology at Temple University. He works primarily with athletes pursuing high performance goals, as well as coaches and athletic departments looking to educate their student-athletes on mental health and performance enhancement strategies. Mitch's typical clients are either college (or college-bound) student-athletes or elite/pro-level competitors; he also provides workshops for teams and coaches. Mitch's areas of expertise include helping competitors with lapses in confidence, mental setbacks from injury, performance anxiety worries, and peak performance preparation.  In addition to his own practice, Mitch is an Adjunct Instructor in Temple University’s College of Public Health, a contributing columnist for USA Triathlon, and the sport psychology consultant to several athletic departments, endurance coaches and national race series. His articles, book chapters, blog posts, podcasts, workshops, and presentations have reached audiences from a wide range of sports, including basketball, squash, lacrosse, softball, tennis, football, figure skating, fencing, gymnastics, triathlon, track, and cross country. Mitch is an athlete himself, and is very active in endurance sports like marathon running, triathlon, and adventure racing. To learn more about Mitch, visit his website and follow him on Twitter and Instagram. Anyone who's played competitive sports knows that the mental game is at least as important as the physical one. My guest this week is clinical and sport psychologist Dr. Mitch Greene, who specializes in helping athletes manage doubts, Anyone who's played competitive sports knows that the mental game is at least as important as the physical one. My guest this week is clinical and sport psychologist Dr. Mitch Greene, who specializes in helping athletes manage doubts, cultivate courage, improve performance, and reach their goals.<br /> <br /> Mitch and I talked about several key issues in sport psychology, including:<br /> <br /> How mind games get in the way of a person’s goals<br /> Dealing with “mind chatter”<br /> Making peace with self doubt<br /> Real versus pseudo-confidence<br /> Therapists’ own mind chatter<br /> Applicability of sport psychology principles to other areas, like academics<br /> How to bring one’s focus to the game<br /> The impossibility of directly controlling sports outcomes<br /> Process versus outcome goals<br /> The challenge of holding a lead<br /> Dealing with performance anxiety<br /> Visualization<br /> The influence of parents’ behavior<br /> Paths to becoming a sport psychologist<br /> Dealing with fears<br /> Getting out of our comfort zones<br /> <br /> Mitch mentioned the Association for Applied Sport Psychology; check out their website.<br /> <br /> Dr. Mitchell Greene completed his undergraduate degree at Boston College and his PhD in clinical psychology at Temple University. He works primarily with athletes pursuing high performance goals, as well as coaches and athletic departments looking to educate their student-athletes on mental health and performance enhancement strategies.<br /> <br /> Mitch's typical clients are either college (or college-bound) student-athletes or elite/pro-level competitors; he also provides workshops for teams and coaches. Mitch's areas of expertise include helping competitors with lapses in confidence, mental setbacks from injury, performance anxiety worries, and peak performance preparation. <br /> <br /> In addition to his own practice, Mitch is an Adjunct Instructor in Temple University’s College of Public Health, a contributing columnist for USA Triathlon, and the sport psychology consultant to several athletic departments, endurance coaches and national race series. His articles, book chapters, blog posts, podcasts, workshops, and presentations have reached audiences from a wide range of sports, including basketball, squash, lacrosse, softball, tennis, football, figure skating, fencing, gymnastics, triathlon, track, and cross country.<br /> <br /> Mitch is an athlete himself, and is very active in endurance sports like marathon running, triathlon, and adventure racing.<br /> <br /> To learn more about Mitch, visit his website and follow him on Twitter and Instagram. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 55:08 Ep. 27: Dr. Martha Farah — Can Manipulating the Brain Make You Smarter? http://sethgillihan.com/ep-27-dr-martha-farah-can-manipulating-the-brain-make-you-smarter/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 06:00:41 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=13925 Many people are looking for ways to gain a mental edge—students, artists, professionals, or just anyone trying to get through their day. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Martha Farah, who has thought a lot about ways to enhance our cognitive ability. Martha is a brain scientist and pioneer in the field of neuroethics, which as the name suggests, explores the ethical issues in neuroscience. Martha and I explored some of the main ethical questions in the field of cognitive enhancement, such as the responsible marketing of products intended to increase your mental capacity, the potential dangers of drugs and devices that might provide a cognitive edge, and a possible "arms race" (or brain race) that would require people to use cognitive enhancement products or fail to keep up. We also discussed: What cognitive enhancement isHow to boost brain performance naturallyHow stimulants like methylphenidate (Ritalin) affect the brainWhether stimulants enhance the cognitive ability of an otherwise healthy brainNon-medical use of stimulants by high school and college studentsWhether stimulants actually make the average person’s brain work betterEffects of stimulants on motivation and confidenceThe prevalence of non-prescribed stimulant use on college campusesPotential downsides of non-prescribed stimulant useCaffeine as a cognitive enhancerHow caffeine worksThe powerful addictive effect of nicotineUsing the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors like Aricept (prescribed for Alzheimer's Disease) as cognitive enhancersThe wakefulness-promoting drug Modafinil (Provigil) as a potential cognitive enhancerDirect brain stimulationTranscranial magnetic stimulationThe problem of basing conclusions on a few studies with small sample sizesTranscranial direct current stimulationWhether cognitive training programs like Lumosity actually workThe brain protective effect of meditation, especially as we ageWhether the “Mozart effect” in babies is real Martha mentioned an article by sociologist Scott Vrecko called "Just How Cognitive Is 'Cognitive Enhancement'"; this link will take you to the full text for the article, which is pretty fascinating. Here are links to other studies that Martha and I discussed: Does Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improve Healthy Working Memory? The Unknowns of Cognitive Enhancement Prescription Stimulants' Effects on Healthy Inhibitory Control, Working Memory, and Episodic Memory: A Meta-Analysis Martha J. Farah, PhD, is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor in Natural Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her BS at MIT and her PhD at Harvard, as well as postdoctoral work at MIT and the Boston University School of Medicine. She quickly rose to the rank of full professor at Carnegie Mellon University before joining the faculty at the Penn. Martha has received numerous honors throughout her career, including a Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a William James Fellow award for lifetime achievement from the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Neuroscience's Science Educator Award. Martha is a fellow of the Cognitive Science Society, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Hastings Center for Bioethics. You can learn more about Martha and her work at her Penn website. Many people are looking for ways to gain a mental edge—students, artists, professionals, or just anyone trying to get through their day. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Martha Farah, who has thought a lot about ways to enhance our cognitive abil... Many people are looking for ways to gain a mental edge—students, artists, professionals, or just anyone trying to get through their day. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Martha Farah, who has thought a lot about ways to enhance our cognitive ability. Martha is a brain scientist and pioneer in the field of neuroethics, which as the name suggests, explores the ethical issues in neuroscience.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Martha and I explored some of the main ethical questions in the field of cognitive enhancement, such as the responsible marketing of products intended to increase your mental capacity, the potential dangers of drugs and devices that might provide a cognitive edge, and a possible "arms race" (or brain race) that would require people to use cognitive enhancement products or fail to keep up. We also discussed:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> What cognitive enhancement isHow to boost brain performance naturallyHow stimulants like methylphenidate (Ritalin) affect the brainWhether stimulants enhance the cognitive ability of an otherwise healthy brainNon-medical use of stimulants by high school and college studentsWhether stimulants actually make the average person’s brain work betterEffects of stimulants on motivation and confidenceThe prevalence of non-prescribed stimulant use on college campusesPotential downsides of non-prescribed stimulant useCaffeine as a cognitive enhancerHow caffeine worksThe powerful addictive effect of nicotineUsing the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors like Aricept (prescribed for Alzheimer's Disease) as cognitive enhancersThe wakefulness-promoting drug Modafinil (Provigil) as a potential cognitive enhancerDirect brain stimulationTranscranial magnetic stimulationThe problem of basing conclusions on a few studies with small sample sizesTranscranial direct current stimulationWhether cognitive training programs like Lumosity actually workThe brain protective effect of meditation, especially as we ageWhether the “Mozart effect” in babies is real<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Martha mentioned an article by sociologist Scott Vrecko called "Just How Cognitive Is 'Cognitive Enhancement'"; this link will take you to the full text for the article, which is pretty fascinating. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Here are links to other studies that Martha and I discussed:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Does Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improve Healthy Working Memory? <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The Unknowns of Cognitive Enhancement<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Prescription Stimulants' Effects on Healthy Inhibitory Control, Working Memory, and Episodic Memory: A Meta-Analysis<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Martha J. Farah, PhD, is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor in Natural Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her BS at MIT and her PhD at Harvard, as well as postdoctoral work at MIT and the Boston University School of Medicine. She quickly rose to the rank of full professor at Carnegie Mellon University before joining the faculty at the Penn.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Martha has received numerous honors throughout her career, including a Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a William James Fellow award for lifetime achievement from the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Neuroscience's Science Educator Award. Martha is a fellow of the Cognitive Science Society, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Hastings Center for Bioethics.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> You can learn more about Martha and her work at her Penn website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:06:28 Ep. 26: Nora Whittaker Jones — How to Keep Your Voice Healthy and Strong http://sethgillihan.com/ep-26-nora-whittaker-jones-how-to-keep-your-voice-healthy-and-strong/ Wed, 23 Jan 2019 05:01:45 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=13898 The voice is our fundamental means of communication, allowing us to translate the ideas in our heads into vibrations that eventually become ideas in other people's heads. My guest this week is intimately acquainted with the human voice; Nora Whittaker Jones works as a Speech Language Pathologist, and specializes in treating people who have issues with their voice. I was one of the people that Nora treated, following vocal surgery a couple years ago to remove a benign growth from my vocal cord. The fact that I'm able to do a podcast now is testament to Nora's work, because I had to relearn how I spoke in order to avoid continuing to injure my throat. Nora and I focused our conversation on how the voice works and how to take care of it, including: The complexity involved in producing speechPotential problems with the voiceTherapy to help vocal wounds heal, without surgeryThe prevalence of vocal disorders among US adultsThe difficulty in breaking unhealthy vocal habitsThe high rates of vocal issues among teachersThe major challenge of losing one’s voiceHow to keep the voice healthyWhat leads to vocal stressA common but often missed condition called muscle tension dysphoniaVocal problems as an indication of problems elsewhere in the bodyThe emotional toll of vocal difficultiesThe value in understanding how the voice works when doing vocal therapyThe importance of collaboration between patient and vocal therapistResonant voice therapyThe difficulty in finding voice therapistsThe importance of a written plan for practice between therapy sessions Nora recommended visiting the website of the National Center for Voice and Speech for more information about the voice and vocal disorders. Nora Whittaker Jones, CCC-SLP, is a speech pathologist and musician whose performance experience includes opening for Bruce Springsteen, playing at the All-Good Music Festival and at WXPN’s Xpontential Music Festival. Her vocals have been featured on local hip-hop albums and a Coke Zero commercial with G-Love and Special Sauce. Nora also performed in and wrote for the Philadelphia-based hip hop/singer-songwriter hybrid group, “The Hustle.” She has performed her original songs at such esteemed venues as the World Café Live, The Tin Angel, The Bitter End (NYC), Club Passim (Cambridge, MA), and various venues in California. Alongside performing as a professional singer/keyboardist, she has taught singing lessons for over 13 years. Nora received a masters from Temple University in Speech Language Pathology with the intent to gain more knowledge about the science of the singing voice. Since then, she has co-taught a course in "Voice Disorders in Professional Voice Users" at Temple University. Nora currently works at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital as an outpatient speech pathologist with the Voice and Swallowing Center while singing occasionally, maintaining a part-time private practice, and enjoying being a wife and mother.   If you'd like to learn more about Nora, check out her website. To schedule an appointment with the Voice and Swallowing Center, call 215-955-1200. The voice is our fundamental means of communication, allowing us to translate the ideas in our heads into vibrations that eventually become ideas in other people's heads. My guest this week is intimately acquainted with the human voice; Nora Whittaker ... The voice is our fundamental means of communication, allowing us to translate the ideas in our heads into vibrations that eventually become ideas in other people's heads. My guest this week is intimately acquainted with the human voice; Nora Whittaker Jones works as a Speech Language Pathologist, and specializes in treating people who have issues with their voice.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I was one of the people that Nora treated, following vocal surgery a couple years ago to remove a benign growth from my vocal cord. The fact that I'm able to do a podcast now is testament to Nora's work, because I had to relearn how I spoke in order to avoid continuing to injure my throat.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora and I focused our conversation on how the voice works and how to take care of it, including:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The complexity involved in producing speechPotential problems with the voiceTherapy to help vocal wounds heal, without surgeryThe prevalence of vocal disorders among US adultsThe difficulty in breaking unhealthy vocal habitsThe high rates of vocal issues among teachersThe major challenge of losing one’s voiceHow to keep the voice healthyWhat leads to vocal stressA common but often missed condition called muscle tension dysphoniaVocal problems as an indication of problems elsewhere in the bodyThe emotional toll of vocal difficultiesThe value in understanding how the voice works when doing vocal therapyThe importance of collaboration between patient and vocal therapistResonant voice therapyThe difficulty in finding voice therapistsThe importance of a written plan for practice between therapy sessions<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora recommended visiting the website of the National Center for Voice and Speech for more information about the voice and vocal disorders. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora Whittaker Jones, CCC-SLP, is a speech pathologist and musician whose performance experience includes opening for Bruce Springsteen, playing at the All-Good Music Festival and at WXPN’s Xpontential Music Festival. Her vocals have been featured on local hip-hop albums and a Coke Zero commercial with G-Love and Special Sauce. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora also performed in and wrote for the Philadelphia-based hip hop/singer-songwriter hybrid group, “The Hustle.” She has performed her original songs at such esteemed venues as the World Café Live, The Tin Angel, The Bitter End (NYC), Club Passim (Cambridge, MA), and various venues in California. Alongside performing as a professional singer/keyboardist, she has taught singing lessons for over 13 years. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora received a masters from Temple University in Speech Language Pathology with the intent to gain more knowledge about the science of the singing voice. Since then, she has co-taught a course in "Voice Disorders in Professional Voice Users" at Temple University. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Nora currently works at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital as an outpatient speech pathologist with the Voice and Swallowing Center while singing occasionally, maintaining a part-time private practice, and enjoying being a wife and mother.  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> If you'd like to learn more about Nora, check out her website. To schedule an appointment with the Voice and Swallowing Center, call 215-955-1200. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 41:05 Ep. 25: Dr. Bryce Carter — How to Build Strength and Resilience in Martial Arts http://sethgillihan.com/ep-25-dr-bryce-carter-build-strength-resilience-martial-arts/ Wed, 16 Jan 2019 06:01:26 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12857 My guest this week is Dr. Bryce Carter, who has a fascinating background as both a highly trained practitioner and instructor of martial arts and a practicing clinical psychologist. On the surface these two areas might seem to have little overlap, but in fact they're highly complementary, as I learned from our discussion. Bryce and I explored the many benefits of training in the martial arts, such as karate, tae kwon do, and jiu jitsu. Some of the topics we discussed included: How martial arts can build self-confidenceWhite Crane Silat (similar to kung fu)Cultivating spiritual developmentMindfulness in actionEastern spiritual principles in the martial artsDeveloping patienceAging and acceptance of physical changesBalancing progress with acceptance of limitationsEmbracing paradoxesThe relationship between instructor and studentEffects of martial arts on relationshipsLearning how you respond under stress, and building resilienceDeveloping the ability to stay calm and focused during conflictUnification of the mind and bodyInstilling discipline and self-controlWhat makes for an effective fighterDealing with anxietyBrazilian jiu jitsuIdentifying where our struggle or impasse really liesHow to deal with unhelpful thoughtsThe state of effortless flowFlow experiences as a psychotherapistOverlap between psychotherapy practice and martial arts trainingSimilarities between CBT and martial arts principlesChoosing among the various martial arts disciplinesSelf-defense coursesThe vibe to look for when choosing a martial arts studioBenefits of martial arts as our bodies ageBeing willing to receive whatever is appearing before us Bryce described a women's self-defense course called Model Mugging; check out their website for training information and locations. Here's more info on Krav Maga, which Bryce mentioned. Bryce Carter, PhD, began his martial art training as a teenager after being on the losing end of a few too many childhood altercations.  He achieved the rank of black belt in Yun Mu Kwan Karate in New York under master Min Pai. Bryce then traveled to Indonesia to begin his 30-year long study of the martial art of White Crane Silat. He trained under the late Grandmaster Subur Rahardja at the training center in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia.  Upon his return to the US, Bryce taught Silat in branches in New York, Dallas, and San Francisco. In 2001 Bryce became the head trainer of White Crane Silat for all North American branches and he has led workshops in France, Germany, Spain, Bali, as well as throughout the US.  Many of his students have gone on to become teachers as well. In addition to Silat, Bryce has studied a variety of martial arts including Russian Systema and Wing Tsun, and is currently a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Bryce is also a licensed clinical psychologist and currently works as a Behavioral Specialist and psychotherapist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and in private practice in Philadelphia. If you're interested in taking a class with Bryce, he teaches adult and children's classes at Main Line United Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Ardmore, PA, and children's classes at his home studio in Havertown, PA. You can find Bryce on the web at Mindful Move; email him at bryceacarter@gmail.com (please note the “a” in the middle). My guest this week is Dr. Bryce Carter, who has a fascinating background as both a highly trained practitioner and instructor of martial arts and a practicing clinical psychologist. On the surface these two areas might seem to have little overlap, My guest this week is Dr. Bryce Carter, who has a fascinating background as both a highly trained practitioner and instructor of martial arts and a practicing clinical psychologist. On the surface these two areas might seem to have little overlap, but in fact they're highly complementary, as I learned from our discussion. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bryce and I explored the many benefits of training in the martial arts, such as karate, tae kwon do, and jiu jitsu. Some of the topics we discussed included:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> How martial arts can build self-confidenceWhite Crane Silat (similar to kung fu)Cultivating spiritual developmentMindfulness in actionEastern spiritual principles in the martial artsDeveloping patienceAging and acceptance of physical changesBalancing progress with acceptance of limitationsEmbracing paradoxesThe relationship between instructor and studentEffects of martial arts on relationshipsLearning how you respond under stress, and building resilienceDeveloping the ability to stay calm and focused during conflictUnification of the mind and bodyInstilling discipline and self-controlWhat makes for an effective fighterDealing with anxietyBrazilian jiu jitsuIdentifying where our struggle or impasse really liesHow to deal with unhelpful thoughtsThe state of effortless flowFlow experiences as a psychotherapistOverlap between psychotherapy practice and martial arts trainingSimilarities between CBT and martial arts principlesChoosing among the various martial arts disciplinesSelf-defense coursesThe vibe to look for when choosing a martial arts studioBenefits of martial arts as our bodies ageBeing willing to receive whatever is appearing before us<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bryce described a women's self-defense course called Model Mugging; check out their website for training information and locations. Here's more info on Krav Maga, which Bryce mentioned. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bryce Carter, PhD, began his martial art training as a teenager after being on the losing end of a few too many childhood altercations.  He achieved the rank of black belt in Yun Mu Kwan Karate in New York under master Min Pai. Bryce then traveled to Indonesia to begin his 30-year long study of the martial art of White Crane Silat. He trained under the late Grandmaster Subur Rahardja at the training center in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia.  Upon his return to the US, Bryce taught Silat in branches in New York, Dallas, and San Francisco.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> In 2001 Bryce became the head trainer of White Crane Silat for all North American branches and he has led workshops in France, Germany, Spain, Bali, as well as throughout the US.  Many of his students have gone on to become teachers as well. In addition to Silat, Bryce has studied a variety of martial arts including Russian Systema and Wing Tsun, and is currently a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Bryce is also a licensed clinical psychologist and currently works as a Behavioral Specialist and psychotherapist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and in private practice in Philadelphia.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> If you're interested in taking a class with Bryce, he teaches adult and children's classes at Main Line United Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Ardmore, PA, and children's classes at his home studio in Havertown, PA. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> You can find Bryce on the web at Mindful Move; email him at bryceacarter@gmail.com (please note the “a” in the middle). Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 57:22 Ep. 24: Dr. Brett Steenbarger — Using the Tools of CBT to Be a Better Trader http://sethgillihan.com/ep-24-dr-brett-steenbarger-using-the-tools-of-cbt-to-be-a-better-trader/ Wed, 09 Jan 2019 05:01:29 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12849 Financial trading is challenging work, requiring a high degree of focus, discipline, and analytical ability. In this week's episode I spoke with psychologist Dr. Brett Steenbarger, who specializes in the psychology of trading. Brett describes the habits of thought and action—many of them drawn from cognitive behavioral principles—that help traders perform at consistently high levels. I learned a lot from our discussion, as someone who's almost entirely naive about the trading world. We explored many topics, including: The difference between trading and investing How traders make money The mental abilities like pattern recognition that make for skillful trading Mental and emotional challenges that traders face The downside of perfectionism and hindsight bias for traders The relevance of CBT principles to dealing with self-talk in trading Treating losses as learning opportunities The problem with assessing one’s personal value based on the ups and downs of trading How traders can prevent burnout The importance of building a highly fulfilling life outside of trading Being “emotionally diversified” for long-term success Buying and selling for non-rational reasons (“Overtrading”) Solution-focused strategies The value of a strength-focused approach to trading Finding flow as a trader How to guard against being over- or under-confident Responding to changing market patterns How investors can stay flexible and adaptable Self-awareness and trading journals The problem with trading in “fight-or-flight” mode Managing excessive fear when trading When a trading problem reflects a bigger life problem The threat that frustration poses to trading, and how to manage it The irrationality of “revenge trading” Developing self-awareness of thoughts and feelings Learning to be one’s own trading coach The value of meditation during the trading day How traders can reduce distractions and increase concentration The effects of fatigue on concentration and performance Is trading for everyone? The difficulty and low success rates in making one’s living from trading Brett referred to his blog, which has a ton of useful information for traders—including guidance for handling "turmoil and opportunity in markets" (which seems to capture our current situation). You can find it here: TraderFeed. Brett N. Steenbarger, PhD, grew up in Canton, Ohio, receiving his BS from Duke University and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kansas. He has been actively involved in the financial markets since the late 1970s. Brett has served as Director of Trader Development for Kingstree Trading, LLC, in Chicago and consults with traders in a number of professional trading organizations. He is also Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY. Drawing upon an intensive research program that began in 1998, Brett has created a number of unique measures of market trend, momentum, and institutional activity designed to aid short-term traders. These measures—and the trading strategies derived from them—have been chronicled daily in the TraderFeed blog. A clinical psychologist and active trader, writer, and researcher, Brett is the author of Enhancing Trader Performance (Wiley, 2006), The Psychology of Trading (Wiley; 2003), and numerous articles on trading psychology for print and online financial publications. (Please note that a percentage of purchases made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) His book chapters on brief psychotherapy can be found in such reference works as The Psychologist's Desk Reference, Encyclopedia of Psychotherapy, Clinical Strategies for Becoming a Master Psychotherapist, and Kaplan & Sadock's Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry and The Handbook of Clinical Psychiatry. His coedited book, Financial trading is challenging work, requiring a high degree of focus, discipline, and analytical ability. In this week's episode I spoke with psychologist Dr. Brett Steenbarger, who specializes in the psychology of trading. Financial trading is challenging work, requiring a high degree of focus, discipline, and analytical ability. In this week's episode I spoke with psychologist Dr. Brett Steenbarger, who specializes in the psychology of trading. Brett describes the habits of thought and action—many of them drawn from cognitive behavioral principles—that help traders perform at consistently high levels.<br /> <br /> I learned a lot from our discussion, as someone who's almost entirely naive about the trading world. We explored many topics, including:<br /> <br /> The difference between trading and investing<br /> How traders make money<br /> The mental abilities like pattern recognition that make for skillful trading<br /> Mental and emotional challenges that traders face<br /> The downside of perfectionism and hindsight bias for traders<br /> The relevance of CBT principles to dealing with self-talk in trading<br /> Treating losses as learning opportunities<br /> The problem with assessing one’s personal value based on the ups and downs of trading<br /> How traders can prevent burnout<br /> The importance of building a highly fulfilling life outside of trading<br /> Being “emotionally diversified” for long-term success<br /> Buying and selling for non-rational reasons (“Overtrading”)<br /> Solution-focused strategies<br /> The value of a strength-focused approach to trading<br /> Finding flow as a trader<br /> How to guard against being over- or under-confident<br /> Responding to changing market patterns<br /> How investors can stay flexible and adaptable<br /> Self-awareness and trading journals<br /> The problem with trading in “fight-or-flight” mode<br /> Managing excessive fear when trading<br /> When a trading problem reflects a bigger life problem<br /> The threat that frustration poses to trading, and how to manage it<br /> The irrationality of “revenge trading”<br /> Developing self-awareness of thoughts and feelings<br /> Learning to be one’s own trading coach<br /> The value of meditation during the trading day<br /> How traders can reduce distractions and increase concentration<br /> The effects of fatigue on concentration and performance<br /> Is trading for everyone?<br /> The difficulty and low success rates in making one’s living from trading<br /> <br /> Brett referred to his blog, which has a ton of useful information for traders—including guidance for handling "turmoil and opportunity in markets" (which seems to capture our current situation). You can find it here: TraderFeed.<br /> <br /> Brett N. Steenbarger, PhD, grew up in Canton, Ohio, receiving his BS from Duke University and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kansas. He has been actively involved in the financial markets since the late 1970s. Brett has served as Director of Trader Development for Kingstree Trading, LLC, in Chicago and consults with traders in a number of professional trading organizations. He is also Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY. Drawing upon an intensive research program that began in 1998, Brett has created a number of unique measures of market trend, momentum, and institutional activity designed to aid short-term traders. These measures—and the trading strategies derived from them—have been chronicled daily in the TraderFeed blog.<br /> <br /> A clinical psychologist and active trader, writer, and researcher, Brett is the author of Enhancing Trader Performance (Wiley, 2006), The Psychology of Trading (Wiley; 2003), and numerous articles on trading psychology for print and online financial publications. (Please note that a percentage of purchases made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you.) His book chapters on brief psychotherapy can be found in such reference works as The Psycholog... Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 52:49 Ep. 23: Dr. Belinda Seiger — Helping Individuals and Families Affected by OCD http://sethgillihan.com/ep-23-dr-belinda-seiger-helping-individuals-and-families-affected-by-ocd/ Wed, 02 Jan 2019 05:01:13 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12837 Millions of people are affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD—not just those who have the condition, but their loved ones. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Belinda Seiger, who specializes in evidence-based treatment of OCD. We focused on how OCD affects families, the best way to treat OCD, and how effective treatment also improves a person's closest relationships. It was a fruitful discussion as we explored many OCD-related topics including: The definition of OCD Why it's such a devastating condition The many types of OCD The need for certainty Approaches that don’t help, like reassurance The ironic approach that effectively treats OCD Taking small steps toward recovery Common reactions to a family member’s OCD The importance of education for family members Disgust OCD Seeking reassurance as an OCD hallmark Frequent frustration in response to OCD The relief families experience following successful treatment Anxiety vs. OCD Health anxiety The difficulty in understanding another person’s OCD Fear of harm and Malevolence OCD OCD as a “bully in the brain” The illogic of OCD Involving family members directly in treatment What to do if a family member isn’t ready to start treatment How to respond when a family member isn’t following the treatment guidelines The need for a “why” to get over OCD The vulnerability in others knowing about a person’s OCD The key role of communication Depression as a result of OCD Dealing with one’s own anxiety about a loved one’s OCD Support groups Online support for families The problem with family accommodation in OCD OCD-related school refusal Seeing OCD as separate from oneself The importance of seeking treatment from an OCD specialist Belinda referenced the International OCD Foundation, which I often refer people to for information about the condition and to find a therapist. Here's their website: IOCDF. Belinda Seiger has been a licensed therapist for over 20 years working with teens, emergent young adults, and families. She completed her master's degree at Columbia University and her PhD at NYU, and has specialized training in working with gifted, twice exceptional (2E) populations, as well as ADHD, substance overuse and addictions, and individuals in highly competitive academic and professional environments. Belinda also completed advanced training in OCD treatment at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, at the same center where I worked for 4 years (the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety) as well as at the Child & Adolescent OCD, Tic, Trich, and Anxiety Group (COTTAGe), a speciality clinic for children. Her clinical practice is located in Princeton, NJ, where she provides psychotherapy for children, adolescents, and adults with a wide range of anxiety and OCD concerns, and with teens making the transition to college and beyond. She also provides training to assist parents and caregivers in managing their child's anxiety and OCD at home. To find out more about Belinda's psychotherapy practice, visit her website: OCDAnxietyHelp.com, call 609-288-8110, or email her at atcprinceton@gmail.com. For individuals who are seeking online OCD-related information and support, check out the OCD Talk blog, written by author and advocate Janet Singer. Janet wrote a memoir that detailed her son's recovery from severe OCD, and I contributed to the book with general information about OCD: Overcoming OCD: A Journey to Recovery. For families who are dealing with OCD, I often recommend Jon Hershfield's excellent book, When a Family Member Has OCD.  (Please note that a percentage of purchases made through these affiliate links will be used to support the podcast, with no additional cost to you.) Millions of people are affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD—not just those who have the condition, but their loved ones. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Belinda Seiger, who specializes in evidence-based treatment of OCD. Millions of people are affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD—not just those who have the condition, but their loved ones. My guest this week is psychologist Dr. Belinda Seiger, who specializes in evidence-based treatment of OCD. We focused on how OCD affects families, the best way to treat OCD, and how effective treatment also improves a person's closest relationships.<br /> <br /> It was a fruitful discussion as we explored many OCD-related topics including:<br /> <br /> The definition of OCD<br /> Why it's such a devastating condition<br /> The many types of OCD<br /> The need for certainty<br /> Approaches that don’t help, like reassurance<br /> The ironic approach that effectively treats OCD<br /> Taking small steps toward recovery<br /> Common reactions to a family member’s OCD<br /> The importance of education for family members<br /> Disgust OCD<br /> Seeking reassurance as an OCD hallmark<br /> Frequent frustration in response to OCD<br /> The relief families experience following successful treatment<br /> Anxiety vs. OCD<br /> Health anxiety<br /> The difficulty in understanding another person’s OCD<br /> Fear of harm and Malevolence OCD<br /> OCD as a “bully in the brain”<br /> The illogic of OCD<br /> Involving family members directly in treatment<br /> What to do if a family member isn’t ready to start treatment<br /> How to respond when a family member isn’t following the treatment guidelines<br /> The need for a “why” to get over OCD<br /> The vulnerability in others knowing about a person’s OCD<br /> The key role of communication<br /> Depression as a result of OCD<br /> Dealing with one’s own anxiety about a loved one’s OCD<br /> Support groups<br /> Online support for families<br /> The problem with family accommodation in OCD<br /> OCD-related school refusal<br /> Seeing OCD as separate from oneself<br /> The importance of seeking treatment from an OCD specialist<br /> <br /> Belinda referenced the International OCD Foundation, which I often refer people to for information about the condition and to find a therapist. Here's their website: IOCDF.<br /> <br /> Belinda Seiger has been a licensed therapist for over 20 years working with teens, emergent young adults, and families. She completed her master's degree at Columbia University and her PhD at NYU, and has specialized training in working with gifted, twice exceptional (2E) populations, as well as ADHD, substance overuse and addictions, and individuals in highly competitive academic and professional environments.<br /> <br /> Belinda also completed advanced training in OCD treatment at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, at the same center where I worked for 4 years (the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety) as well as at the Child & Adolescent OCD, Tic, Trich, and Anxiety Group (COTTAGe), a speciality clinic for children. Her clinical practice is located in Princeton, NJ, where she provides psychotherapy for children, adolescents, and adults with a wide range of anxiety and OCD concerns, and with teens making the transition to college and beyond. She also provides training to assist parents and caregivers in managing their child's anxiety and OCD at home.<br /> <br /> To find out more about Belinda's psychotherapy practice, visit her website: OCDAnxietyHelp.com, call 609-288-8110, or email her at atcprinceton@gmail.com.<br /> <br /> For individuals who are seeking online OCD-related information and support, check out the OCD Talk blog, written by author and advocate Janet Singer. Janet wrote a memoir that detailed her son's recovery from severe OCD, and I contributed to the book with general information about OCD: Overcoming OCD: A Journey to Recovery.<br /> <br /> For families who are dealing with OCD, I often recommend Jon Hershfield's excellent book, When a Family Member Has OCD. <br /> Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 58:49 Ep. 22: August Turak — How to Transcend Selfishness and Live a Life of Purpose http://sethgillihan.com/ep-22-august-turak-how-to-transcend-selfishness-and-live-a-life-of-purpose/ Wed, 26 Dec 2018 05:01:22 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12819 Have you ever wondered what the best way is to live your life? In this week's episode I spoke with August Turak about his new book, Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim, and the Purpose of Life (Clovercroft Publishing, 2018), which addresses exactly that question. The answer, as August describes, was not a new revelation; he suggests that each of us knows the kind of life we ought to be living. The obstacle is not in the knowing, but in the doing, and our fear keeps us from becoming the person we could be. Brother John tells the story of August's transformative encounter with a Trappist monk's radical selflessness at Mepkin Abbey in 1996. Through this experience August discovered how we can move through our fear from fundamentally selfish to more selfless human beings. August and I talked about the many ideas captured in his relatively short book, which is beautifully illustrated with oil paintings by Glenn Harrington. Some of the topics we touched on included: Being seized by the idea that there’s something more to life Love as a profound yearning Being so in love with something that we don’t know what to do with ourselves The action-inspiration link The self-serving effects of serving others The inherent longing for transformation The hero’s journey as a transformation of being The excuses that prevent us from taking action Making self-transcendence a top priority The importance of undertaking self-improvement with a group Self-transcendence as the end of selfishness The ennui that comes from self-focus The joy in loving ourselves The necessity of making commitments Ambivalence toward transcendence The impossibility of imagining what it will be like on the other side of transcendence Being surprised by grace Service as an effortless privilege The importance of small steps to make big changes The positive peer pressure of a community Finding clarity in our view on life August referenced a poem early in the podcast, called "My Own Heart Let Me Have More Pity On." You can find the full poem here. August's story about his encounter with Brother John won a worldwide "Power of Purpose" essay competition by the Templeton Foundation in 2004. In addition to being an author, August is a speaker, a consultant, and a contributor for Forbes and the BBC. He is also the founder of the spiritual and educational nonprofit the Self Knowledge Symposium Foundation (SKSF). August retired early as a successful entrepreneur and corporate executive; he attributes much of his success to living and working alongside the Trappist monks of Mepkin Abbey since 1996. As a frequent monastic guest, he learned firsthand from the monks as they grew an incredibly successful portfolio of businesses. His previous book, Business Secrets of the Trappist Monks, was published in 2013 by Columbia Business School Publishing. When he is not praying and working alongside the Trappist monks of Mepkin Abbey, he works with his nonprofit and lives on a 75-acre farm near Raleigh, North Carolina. Both of August's books have very strong reviews and are available on Amazon and elsewhere (please note that these are affiliate links, so a percentage of sales made through them will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you): Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim, and the Purpose of Life Business Secrets of the Trappist Monks To learn more about August and his work, please visit his website and follow him on Facebook and Twitter. You can view his articles for Forbes.com here, and listen to a representative BBC contribution here. Please note: The banner image for this post was taken by Davey Borden and is part of a collection called "Mepkin Abbey South Carolina." It is used in accordance with the license.  Have you ever wondered what the best way is to live your life? In this week's episode I spoke with August Turak about his new book, Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim, and the Purpose of Life (Clovercroft Publishing, 2018), Have you ever wondered what the best way is to live your life? In this week's episode I spoke with August Turak about his new book, Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim, and the Purpose of Life (Clovercroft Publishing, 2018), which addresses exactly that question.<br /> <br /> The answer, as August describes, was not a new revelation; he suggests that each of us knows the kind of life we ought to be living. The obstacle is not in the knowing, but in the doing, and our fear keeps us from becoming the person we could be.<br /> <br /> Brother John tells the story of August's transformative encounter with a Trappist monk's radical selflessness at Mepkin Abbey in 1996. Through this experience August discovered how we can move through our fear from fundamentally selfish to more selfless human beings.<br /> <br /> August and I talked about the many ideas captured in his relatively short book, which is beautifully illustrated with oil paintings by Glenn Harrington. Some of the topics we touched on included:<br /> <br /> Being seized by the idea that there’s something more to life<br /> Love as a profound yearning<br /> Being so in love with something that we don’t know what to do with ourselves<br /> The action-inspiration link<br /> The self-serving effects of serving others<br /> The inherent longing for transformation<br /> The hero’s journey as a transformation of being<br /> The excuses that prevent us from taking action<br /> Making self-transcendence a top priority<br /> The importance of undertaking self-improvement with a group<br /> Self-transcendence as the end of selfishness<br /> The ennui that comes from self-focus<br /> The joy in loving ourselves<br /> The necessity of making commitments<br /> Ambivalence toward transcendence<br /> The impossibility of imagining what it will be like on the other side of transcendence<br /> Being surprised by grace<br /> Service as an effortless privilege<br /> The importance of small steps to make big changes<br /> The positive peer pressure of a community<br /> Finding clarity in our view on life<br /> <br /> August referenced a poem early in the podcast, called "My Own Heart Let Me Have More Pity On." You can find the full poem here.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> August's story about his encounter with Brother John won a worldwide "Power of Purpose" essay competition by the Templeton Foundation in 2004. In addition to being an author, August is a speaker, a consultant, and a contributor for Forbes and the BBC. He is also the founder of the spiritual and educational nonprofit the Self Knowledge Symposium Foundation (SKSF).<br /> <br /> August retired early as a successful entrepreneur and corporate executive; he attributes much of his success to living and working alongside the Trappist monks of Mepkin Abbey since 1996. As a frequent monastic guest, he learned firsthand from the monks as they grew an incredibly successful portfolio of businesses. His previous book, Business Secrets of the Trappist Monks, was published in 2013 by Columbia Business School Publishing. When he is not praying and working alongside the Trappist monks of Mepkin Abbey, he works with his nonprofit and lives on a 75-acre farm near Raleigh, North Carolina.<br /> <br /> Both of August's books have very strong reviews and are available on Amazon and elsewhere (please note that these are affiliate links, so a percentage of sales made through them will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to you):<br /> <br /> Brother John: A Monk, a Pilgrim, and the Purpose of Life<br /> <br /> Business Secrets of the Trappist Monks<br /> <br /> To learn more about August and his work, please visit his website and follow him on Facebook and Twitter. You can view his articles for Forbes.com here, and listen to a representative BBC contribution here.<br /> <br /> Please note: The banner image for this post was t... Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:24:02 Ep. 21: Dr. Joel Minden — How to Stop Anxiety from Controlling Your Life http://sethgillihan.com/ep-21-dr-joel-minden-how-to-keep-anxiety-from-controlling-your-life/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 05:01:07 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12792 Everyone experiences anxiety at times, and it can actually be quite useful. But when it dominates a person's life, anxiety can be debilitating. My guest this week is Dr. Joel Minden, who specializes in the treatment of anxiety, including panic, generalized anxiety, and social phobia, as well as the related conditions of posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Joel's primary approach is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and he also draws on elements of mindful acceptance. I enjoyed exploring the treatment of anxiety with someone whose approach has a lot of overlap with mine. We talked about many topics related to anxiety, including: the difference between helpful and unhelpful anxiety how anxiety and fear are related the problem of avoidance depression as a result of anxiety and avoidance a transdiagnostic approach to treating all types of anxiety, and other conditions like depression the difference between stress and anxiety common treatment elements across anxiety conditions "anxious fictions," which are highly negative predictions about how things will turn out the limitations of positive thinking, vs. realistic thinking how to work through anxiety and avoidance the pros and cons of using marijuana to manage anxiety potential advantages of focusing on behavior in CBT dealing with disturbing thoughts, aka "oddities of the mind" how intrusive thoughts are like cats skills for dealing with social anxiety the challenge of uncertainty behavioral techniques for dealing with panic the challenge and importance of facing our fears in exposure therapy exercise for anxiety and stress management, including for those with an anxious personality what "acceptance" means in the context of anxiety treatment (vs. hopelessness) the value in creating more space from which to choose how we react to overwhelming emotions Whew! We covered a lot, but our time went by quickly. I hope you enjoy our conversation. Here's a link to the book Joel mentioned: Emotion Efficacy Therapy. (Please note this is an affiliate link, so a percentage of sales through it is used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) If you'd like to connect with Joel, you can find him on Twitter, on his CBT Chico website, and on his Psychology Today blog, CBT and Me. His book Show Your Anxiety Who's Boss will be available in summer 2019. It provides practical, flexible, and evidence-based anxiety management strategies to help you prepare for upcoming challenges, prioritize valued behavior over immediate anxiety reduction, and respond with acceptance and self-compassion when anxious thoughts and feelings create a distraction. You'll notice that the title of his book has changed since the time of our conversation; at that time it was going to be called Show Your Mind Who's Boss. Joel is a licensed psychologist in California and director of the Chico Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. He’s a Diplomate of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and is a lecturer in the Psychology Department at California State University, Chico. Joel also has a background in sport psychology and is a certified strength and conditioning specialist. Everyone experiences anxiety at times, and it can actually be quite useful. But when it dominates a person's life, anxiety can be debilitating. My guest this week is Dr. Joel Minden, who specializes in the treatment of anxiety, including panic, Everyone experiences anxiety at times, and it can actually be quite useful. But when it dominates a person's life, anxiety can be debilitating. My guest this week is Dr. Joel Minden, who specializes in the treatment of anxiety, including panic, generalized anxiety, and social phobia, as well as the related conditions of posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorder.<br /> <br /> Joel's primary approach is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and he also draws on elements of mindful acceptance. I enjoyed exploring the treatment of anxiety with someone whose approach has a lot of overlap with mine. We talked about many topics related to anxiety, including:<br /> <br /> the difference between helpful and unhelpful anxiety<br /> how anxiety and fear are related<br /> the problem of avoidance<br /> depression as a result of anxiety and avoidance<br /> a transdiagnostic approach to treating all types of anxiety, and other conditions like depression<br /> the difference between stress and anxiety<br /> common treatment elements across anxiety conditions<br /> "anxious fictions," which are highly negative predictions about how things will turn out<br /> the limitations of positive thinking, vs. realistic thinking<br /> how to work through anxiety and avoidance<br /> the pros and cons of using marijuana to manage anxiety<br /> potential advantages of focusing on behavior in CBT<br /> dealing with disturbing thoughts, aka "oddities of the mind"<br /> how intrusive thoughts are like cats<br /> skills for dealing with social anxiety<br /> the challenge of uncertainty<br /> behavioral techniques for dealing with panic<br /> the challenge and importance of facing our fears in exposure therapy<br /> exercise for anxiety and stress management, including for those with an anxious personality<br /> what "acceptance" means in the context of anxiety treatment (vs. hopelessness)<br /> the value in creating more space from which to choose how we react to overwhelming emotions<br /> <br /> Whew! We covered a lot, but our time went by quickly. I hope you enjoy our conversation.<br /> <br /> Here's a link to the book Joel mentioned: Emotion Efficacy Therapy. (Please note this is an affiliate link, so a percentage of sales through it is used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.)<br /> <br /> If you'd like to connect with Joel, you can find him on Twitter, on his CBT Chico website, and on his Psychology Today blog, CBT and Me. His book Show Your Anxiety Who's Boss will be available in summer 2019. It provides practical, flexible, and evidence-based anxiety management strategies to help you prepare for upcoming challenges, prioritize valued behavior over immediate anxiety reduction, and respond with acceptance and self-compassion when anxious thoughts and feelings create a distraction. You'll notice that the title of his book has changed since the time of our conversation; at that time it was going to be called Show Your Mind Who's Boss.<br /> <br /> Joel is a licensed psychologist in California and director of the Chico Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. He’s a Diplomate of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and is a lecturer in the Psychology Department at California State University, Chico. Joel also has a background in sport psychology and is a certified strength and conditioning specialist. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:10:41 Ep. 20: Dr. Jessica Breland — Latest Findings on the Obesity Epidemic Among US Veterans http://sethgillihan.com/ep-20-dr-jessica-breland-latest-findings-on-the-obesity-epidemic-among-us-veterans/ Wed, 12 Dec 2018 05:01:57 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12768 Recent research has identified an epidemic of obesity among US veterans. Dr. Jessica Breland has been at the forefront of this research, having recently published data on the prevalence of overweight (nearly 80%) and obesity (~40%)  among nearly 5 million patients in the Veterans Health Administration. In this week's episode I explored this and other findings from Jessica's research. Among the topics we discussed were: The VHA services available to address the obesity epidemic Unique challenges that women in the military often face Aspects of military culture that may play into disordered eating Why we often seek comfort through eating How to let emotional overeating urges pass The link between military sexual trauma and eating disorders We also talked about Jessica's efforts to share her research findings through social media, which presents advantages and potential risks. Topics we covered include: Why many researchers seem reluctant to use social media professionally The double-edged sword of researchers' having greater control over how they present their findings to the public The use of social media and phone apps to collect research data Jessica's development of a primer for academics who want to use broadcast their research findings through social media The possibility that tenure and promotion could one day depend on generating a social media following I know Jessica from many years ago when she was a senior at Penn and I was a graduate student, and I oversaw her senior thesis project. The research we did together resulted in several publications that Jessica and I co-authored with others, like this one. Jessica Y. Breland, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and Core Investigator at the Center for Innovation to Implementation at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, as well as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently has a VA Career Development Award focused on engaging veterans in behavioral health services through an online self-help tool. Jessica received her PhD in psychology from Rutgers University and completed her clinical internship at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. You can find Jessica online at the Stanford University website, as well as on Twitter. Google Scholar has links to her many research publications. Recent research has identified an epidemic of obesity among US veterans. Dr. Jessica Breland has been at the forefront of this research, having recently published data on the prevalence of overweight (nearly 80%) and obesity (~40%)  among nearly 5 mill... Recent research has identified an epidemic of obesity among US veterans. Dr. Jessica Breland has been at the forefront of this research, having recently published data on the prevalence of overweight (nearly 80%) and obesity (~40%)  among nearly 5 million patients in the Veterans Health Administration. In this week's episode I explored this and other findings from Jessica's research. Among the topics we discussed were:<br /> <br /> The VHA services available to address the obesity epidemic<br /> Unique challenges that women in the military often face<br /> Aspects of military culture that may play into disordered eating<br /> Why we often seek comfort through eating<br /> How to let emotional overeating urges pass<br /> The link between military sexual trauma and eating disorders<br /> <br /> We also talked about Jessica's efforts to share her research findings through social media, which presents advantages and potential risks. Topics we covered include:<br /> <br /> Why many researchers seem reluctant to use social media professionally<br /> The double-edged sword of researchers' having greater control over how they present their findings to the public<br /> The use of social media and phone apps to collect research data<br /> Jessica's development of a primer for academics who want to use broadcast their research findings through social media<br /> The possibility that tenure and promotion could one day depend on generating a social media following<br /> <br /> I know Jessica from many years ago when she was a senior at Penn and I was a graduate student, and I oversaw her senior thesis project. The research we did together resulted in several publications that Jessica and I co-authored with others, like this one.<br /> <br /> Jessica Y. Breland, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and Core Investigator at the Center for Innovation to Implementation at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, as well as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently has a VA Career Development Award focused on engaging veterans in behavioral health services through an online self-help tool. Jessica received her PhD in psychology from Rutgers University and completed her clinical internship at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX.<br /> <br /> You can find Jessica online at the Stanford University website, as well as on Twitter. Google Scholar has links to her many research publications. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 40:40 Ep. 19: Megan MacCutcheon — Keys to Women’s Confidence and Healthy Self-Esteem http://sethgillihan.com/ep-19-megan-maccutcheon-keys-to-womens-confidence-and-healthy-self-esteem/ Wed, 05 Dec 2018 05:01:26 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12748  Countless people struggle to see themselves in a positive light, and women face specific challenges to their self-esteem. In this week's episode I talk with licensed professional counselor Megan MacCutcheon about her Self-Esteem Workbook for Women. Self-esteem has become a rather polarizing idea, in part because high self-esteem is often portrayed as "believing you are perfectly awesome," as this article in the Harvard Business Review says. But it all depends on how you define self-esteem, according to my guest. Megan's nuanced definition is nearly indistinguishable from supposedly better alternatives like "self-compassion," suggesting that the more controversial versions of self-esteem are straw-man caricatures. Megan and I explored the crucial distinction between positive self-esteem and narcissism, as well as the relation between self-esteem and self-compassion, self-confidence, and self-love. We also considered topics including: The lack of education about proper psychological self-care Specific challenges to women's self-esteem What it means to take responsibility for one's self-esteem The effects of practicing kindness toward oneself Why it's often so hard for us to recognize our own worth Where low self-esteem might come from Why healthy self-esteem must come from within Common effects of parenthood on self-esteem The importance of accepting our parental imperfections The possibility of loving ourselves, limitations and flaws included Choosing the right measuring stick for ourselves Whether the pursuit of gender equality is actually beneficial to women's self-esteem How to use self-talk to build healthier self-esteem Leading with action to build confidence The role of body posture in self-image I hope you enjoy our conversation and I look forward to your comments. Megan MacCutcheon is a registered licensed professional counselor with a practice in Vienna, VA. She received her BS in communication from Boston University and her Master of Education in community agency counseling from George Mason University.  Megan is a topic expert and blogger on GoodTherapy.org and has experience as a therapist and domestic violence systems advocate at The Women's Center in Vienna, VA, and as a child psychiatric specialist at the Children's National Medical Center. Her books are available for purchase through Amazon and other booksellers: Building Self-Esteem: A Guide to Achieving Self-Acceptance and a Healthier, Happier Life The Self Esteem Workbook for Women: 5 Steps to Gaining Confidence and Inner Strength (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a percentage of each purchase made through these links will be used to support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Find Megan online at her website and on GoodTherapy.org where you can read her blog posts on self-esteem and other topics.  Countless people struggle to see themselves in a positive light, and women face specific challenges to their self-esteem. In this week's episode I talk with licensed professional counselor Megan MacCutcheon about her Self-Esteem Workbook for Wom... <br /> <br /> <br /> Countless people struggle to see themselves in a positive light, and women face specific challenges to their self-esteem. In this week's episode I talk with licensed professional counselor Megan MacCutcheon about her Self-Esteem Workbook for Women.<br /> <br /> Self-esteem has become a rather polarizing idea, in part because high self-esteem is often portrayed as "believing you are perfectly awesome," as this article in the Harvard Business Review says. But it all depends on how you define self-esteem, according to my guest. Megan's nuanced definition is nearly indistinguishable from supposedly better alternatives like "self-compassion," suggesting that the more controversial versions of self-esteem are straw-man caricatures.<br /> <br /> Megan and I explored the crucial distinction between positive self-esteem and narcissism, as well as the relation between self-esteem and self-compassion, self-confidence, and self-love. We also considered topics including:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> The lack of education about proper psychological self-care<br /> Specific challenges to women's self-esteem<br /> What it means to take responsibility for one's self-esteem<br /> The effects of practicing kindness toward oneself<br /> Why it's often so hard for us to recognize our own worth<br /> Where low self-esteem might come from<br /> Why healthy self-esteem must come from within<br /> Common effects of parenthood on self-esteem<br /> The importance of accepting our parental imperfections<br /> The possibility of loving ourselves, limitations and flaws included<br /> Choosing the right measuring stick for ourselves<br /> Whether the pursuit of gender equality is actually beneficial to women's self-esteem<br /> How to use self-talk to build healthier self-esteem<br /> Leading with action to build confidence<br /> The role of body posture in self-image<br /> <br /> I hope you enjoy our conversation and I look forward to your comments.<br /> <br /> Megan MacCutcheon is a registered licensed professional counselor with a practice in Vienna, VA. She received her BS in communication from Boston University and her Master of Education in community agency counseling from George Mason University.  Megan is a topic expert and blogger on GoodTherapy.org and has experience as a therapist and domestic violence systems advocate at The Women's Center in Vienna, VA, and as a child psychiatric specialist at the Children's National Medical Center.<br /> <br /> Her books are available for purchase through Amazon and other booksellers:<br /> <br /> Building Self-Esteem: A Guide to Achieving Self-Acceptance and a Healthier, Happier Life<br /> <br /> The Self Esteem Workbook for Women: 5 Steps to Gaining Confidence and Inner Strength<br /> <br /> (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a percentage of each purchase made through these links will be used to support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> Find Megan online at her website and on GoodTherapy.org where you can read her blog posts on self-esteem and other topics. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 54:06 Ep. 18: Dr. Jay Fournier – Looking at the Brain to Better Understand Depression http://sethgillihan.com/ep-18-dr-jay-fournier-looking-at-the-brain-to-better-understand-depression/ Wed, 28 Nov 2018 05:01:27 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12684 It's a near certainty that in your lifetime, you or someone you love will experience major depressive disorder. This common condition is on the rise in recent years, and while awareness and the availability of treatment are greater than ever, countless individuals struggle to find relief. My guest this week is Dr. Jay Fournier, a clinical psychologist working at the frontier of depression research. Jay's work is focused on understanding the many varieties of depression, with the aim to maximize treatment outcomes. His work has revealed, for example, that depressed individuals with certain personality types do better on medication than with psychotherapy. Jay's recent work is using the latest technological advances to examine patterns of brain activity that are involved in depression and related variables. We discussed some of the important questions from Jay's field, including: Why do people with depression do better in some treatments than others? Can we develop new treatments, or match individuals to treatments, based on a better understanding of an individual's depression? Does exposure to a certain kind of treatment change the effectiveness of that treatment for future episodes of depression? Why do personality disorders make a difference in depression treatment? How can brain imaging further our understanding of depression, and of differences among depressed people? How does functional MRI show what's happening in the brain? Why there are such inconsistent findings in brain imaging studies of depression? How is it possible that the most recent meta-analysis found no consistent differences in brain activity in depressed people versus those without depression? Can brain scans be used to figure out if an individual has a specific psychiatric  condition? How can brain imagining help to explain the considerable overlap in symptoms across some psychiatric conditions—like the difficulty concentrating with both anxiety and depression? I've known Jay since graduate school where we met, and have enjoyed watching the development of his career. He's already made a notable contribution to his field, and his research has been featured multiple times in the popular press like the New York Times, such as this article: "Popular Drugs May Help Only Severe Depression." Jay obviously has a bright research career ahead of him, and I felt fortunate to have him on the podcast. I'll be interested to hear your feedback about our discussion. Jay C. Fournier, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Psychiatry Department at the University of Pittsburgh. He completed his doctorate in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and his postdoctoral work at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine. Jay is the first author on a landmark study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, and his research has been featured in other prestigious journals like the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and the British Journal of Psychiatry. You can find Jay online at his faculty webpage and discover more of his research through his Google Scholar profile. It's a near certainty that in your lifetime, you or someone you love will experience major depressive disorder. This common condition is on the rise in recent years, and while awareness and the availability of treatment are greater than ever, It's a near certainty that in your lifetime, you or someone you love will experience major depressive disorder. This common condition is on the rise in recent years, and while awareness and the availability of treatment are greater than ever, countless individuals struggle to find relief.<br /> <br /> My guest this week is Dr. Jay Fournier, a clinical psychologist working at the frontier of depression research. Jay's work is focused on understanding the many varieties of depression, with the aim to maximize treatment outcomes. His work has revealed, for example, that depressed individuals with certain personality types do better on medication than with psychotherapy.<br /> <br /> Jay's recent work is using the latest technological advances to examine patterns of brain activity that are involved in depression and related variables. We discussed some of the important questions from Jay's field, including:<br /> <br /> Why do people with depression do better in some treatments than others?<br /> Can we develop new treatments, or match individuals to treatments, based on a better understanding of an individual's depression?<br /> Does exposure to a certain kind of treatment change the effectiveness of that treatment for future episodes of depression?<br /> Why do personality disorders make a difference in depression treatment?<br /> How can brain imaging further our understanding of depression, and of differences among depressed people?<br /> How does functional MRI show what's happening in the brain?<br /> Why there are such inconsistent findings in brain imaging studies of depression?<br /> How is it possible that the most recent meta-analysis found no consistent differences in brain activity in depressed people versus those without depression?<br /> Can brain scans be used to figure out if an individual has a specific psychiatric  condition?<br /> How can brain imagining help to explain the considerable overlap in symptoms across some psychiatric conditions—like the difficulty concentrating with both anxiety and depression?<br /> <br /> I've known Jay since graduate school where we met, and have enjoyed watching the development of his career. He's already made a notable contribution to his field, and his research has been featured multiple times in the popular press like the New York Times, such as this article: "Popular Drugs May Help Only Severe Depression." Jay obviously has a bright research career ahead of him, and I felt fortunate to have him on the podcast. I'll be interested to hear your feedback about our discussion.<br /> <br /> Jay C. Fournier, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Psychiatry Department at the University of Pittsburgh. He completed his doctorate in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and his postdoctoral work at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine.<br /> <br /> Jay is the first author on a landmark study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, and his research has been featured in other prestigious journals like the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and the British Journal of Psychiatry.<br /> <br /> You can find Jay online at his faculty webpage and discover more of his research through his Google Scholar profile. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:04:02 Ep. 17: Brian Lies – Finding Hope After Loss and Grief http://sethgillihan.com/ep-17-brian-lies-finding-hope-after-loss-and-grief/ Wed, 21 Nov 2018 05:01:22 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12689 At some point each of us will lose something we care about: a loved one, a relationship, our job, our health. My guest this week, author and illustrator Brian Lies, explores the arc of loss, grief, and renewal in his new book, The Rough Patch. In Brian's words, this book is "a meditation on grief and the anger which sometimes accompanies it ... and on hope." The Rough Patch tells the story of Evan and his dog, who enjoyed a blissful life together. And then suddenly Evan's world is shattered by the death of his dog, "and nothing is the same." The author explores the complex mental, physical, and emotional reactions that make up grief, and the hope that ultimately can find us. I read The Rough Patch recently and can attest that it does feel like a meditation. Reviewers are echoing my own reactions to this book, saying that it's "a must-read" for readers "of any age," even though it's billed as a children's book. Others call it "an exquisite depiction of grief and hope, and a helpful guide for children and adults who are going through their own rough patches." I felt very fortunate to have Brian on the podcast to talk about the process of creating this book, and the universal human experiences of love and loss that it depicts. During our conversation we discussed: The complex range of emotions that can be part of grieving How life can call us back after we've withdrawn The many choices, big and small, that went into creating The Rough Patch The interplay between text and illustration The many kinds of loss that kids experience The challenge of writing, or any kind of creative endeavor How artists arrive at an individual style The value in sticking with a worthwhile project even when it's very difficult Brian's portrayal of grief and hope resonated with so many accounts of loss that I've heard from the people I work with as a therapist, and with my personal experiences. It also seems to apply to the process of recovering from a major depression, as I described in this blog post from earlier this year: How Do You Know When Your Depression Is Improving? As Brian explains, The Rough Patch is not a "how-to" book on grieving. Each of us has an individual path following loss, and this is Evan's. Still, there are some universals that Brian captures, which makes this such a valuable book for so many people. © Karen Wilson Wong Brian Lies is the author and/or illustrator of more than two dozen children’s books, including his New York Times bestselling bat series, like Bats at the Beach and Bats at the Library. His most recent books are The Rough Patch (Grenwillow/HarperCollins) and Got to Get to Bear's! (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). When he’s not working on his next books, he’s often visiting elementary schools around the country, encouraging writing and creativity in young people. Brian and his wife have a grown daughter and live south of Boston, MA. (Please note: These are affiliate links to Brian's books, meaning a portion of sales from the link will be used to support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional cost to you.) You can find Brian's books and learn more about him on his website and on his Amazon Author Page. Brian is also on Twitter and Instagram. At some point each of us will lose something we care about: a loved one, a relationship, our job, our health. My guest this week, author and illustrator Brian Lies, explores the arc of loss, grief, and renewal in his new book, The Rough Patch. At some point each of us will lose something we care about: a loved one, a relationship, our job, our health. My guest this week, author and illustrator Brian Lies, explores the arc of loss, grief, and renewal in his new book, The Rough Patch. In Brian's words, this book is "a meditation on grief and the anger which sometimes accompanies it ... and on hope."<br /> <br /> The Rough Patch tells the story of Evan and his dog, who enjoyed a blissful life together. And then suddenly Evan's world is shattered by the death of his dog, "and nothing is the same." The author explores the complex mental, physical, and emotional reactions that make up grief, and the hope that ultimately can find us.<br /> <br /> I read The Rough Patch recently and can attest that it does feel like a meditation. Reviewers are echoing my own reactions to this book, saying that it's "a must-read" for readers "of any age," even though it's billed as a children's book. Others call it "an exquisite depiction of grief and hope, and a helpful guide for children and adults who are going through their own rough patches."<br /> <br /> I felt very fortunate to have Brian on the podcast to talk about the process of creating this book, and the universal human experiences of love and loss that it depicts. During our conversation we discussed:<br /> <br /> The complex range of emotions that can be part of grieving<br /> How life can call us back after we've withdrawn<br /> The many choices, big and small, that went into creating The Rough Patch<br /> The interplay between text and illustration<br /> The many kinds of loss that kids experience<br /> The challenge of writing, or any kind of creative endeavor<br /> How artists arrive at an individual style<br /> The value in sticking with a worthwhile project even when it's very difficult<br /> <br /> Brian's portrayal of grief and hope resonated with so many accounts of loss that I've heard from the people I work with as a therapist, and with my personal experiences. It also seems to apply to the process of recovering from a major depression, as I described in this blog post from earlier this year: How Do You Know When Your Depression Is Improving?<br /> <br /> As Brian explains, The Rough Patch is not a "how-to" book on grieving. Each of us has an individual path following loss, and this is Evan's. Still, there are some universals that Brian captures, which makes this such a valuable book for so many people.<br /> <br /> <br /> © Karen Wilson Wong<br /> <br /> Brian Lies is the author and/or illustrator of more than two dozen children’s books, including his New York Times bestselling bat series, like Bats at the Beach and Bats at the Library. His most recent books are The Rough Patch (Grenwillow/HarperCollins) and Got to Get to Bear's! (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). When he’s not working on his next books, he’s often visiting elementary schools around the country, encouraging writing and creativity in young people. Brian and his wife have a grown daughter and live south of Boston, MA.<br /> <br /> <br /> (Please note: These are affiliate links to Brian's books, meaning a portion of sales from the link will be used to support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional cost to you.)<br /> <br /> You can find Brian's books and learn more about him on his website and on his Amazon Author Page. Brian is also on Twitter and Instagram. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:04:22 Ep. 16: Dr. Stephanie Sarkis — How to Spot, Manage, and Avoid Gaslighters in Your Life http://sethgillihan.com/ep-16-dr-stephanie-sarkis-how-to-spot-manage-and-avoid-gaslighters-in-your-life/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 05:01:24 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12663 Last year I kept seeing posts on PsychologyToday.com about gaslighting. They were often among the most popular posts, and I kept wondering, What the heck is "gaslighting"? Finally I Googled it and found a succinct definition: "to manipulate (someone) by psychological means into questioning their own sanity." The most popular post is the first hit in a Google search for "gaslighting," and it was written by my guest for this week, Dr. Stephanie Sarkis:  I was really happy to have the chance to dive into this topic with Stephanie, since she's clearly an authority on the subject. I read her new book entitled Gaslighting, and explored questions including: Where does the concept of gaslighting come from? What's the value in having a label for this pattern of behavior? Are gaslighters aware of what they're doing? How can we distinguish gaslighting from ordinary manipulation? How common are gaslighters? Why is it so hard to get away from a gaslighter? How can we avoid attracting gaslighters, such as on the dating scene? How can we recognize gaslighting before getting drawn into it? How can we manage the gaslighters in our families? If you're having a hard time picturing what gaslighting looks like, Stephanie provided an example in this Star Trek episode in which the bad guy tries to manipulate Patrick Stewart's character into denying what he sees. You can also check out the movie that gave the concept its name: 1944 movie "Gaslight." Image by Fred the Oyster In this episode I brought up a classic psychology study on conformity but blanked on the name of the researcher who did it during my conversation with Stephanie; it was done by psychologist Solomon Asch in the 1950s. Groups of participants were asked to judge the length of various lines. What each participant didn't realize was that they were the only real participant, and the rest of the people in the room were "confederates," meaning they were working with the experimenters. The study was designed to test how much people would go along with the other people in the room when they were giving answers that were clearly wrong. For example, for this example image all the confederates would say that line "B" was the same length as the single line on the left, when obviously line "A" is the correct match. Just kidding, line "C" is the correct answer. A surprising percentage of participants went along with the group, even though it meant denying what was right in front of them. I referenced the study because of the obvious distress it causes when others make us question our own reality. You can read the original study here: A Minority of One. I also referenced a recent podcast called "Dr. Death." I thought it was well done, but I would caution that it's a bit horrifying at times (as the title suggests...). Here's a link for more information about "Dr. Death" from Wondery. Dr. Stephanie Sarkis completed her PhD, MEd, and EdS in Mental Health Counseling from the University of Florida. She is a bestselling author of seven books, including her latest, Gaslighting: Recognize Manipulative and Emotionally Abusive People—and Break Free. Dr. Sarkis is an American Mental Health Counselors Association Diplomate and one of only twenty Clinical Mental Health Specialists in Child and Adolescent Counseling in the US. She is also a Florida Supreme Court Certified Family and Circuit Civil Mediator, as well as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and a National Certified Counselor. She maintains a private practice in Tampa, FL, where she specializes in gaslighting, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Gaslighting is available for purchase from Amazon. (Please note this is an affiliate link, meaning a percentage of sales that come through this link will be used to support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional charge to you.) You can find Stephanie online at her website and on her blogs at Psychology... Last year I kept seeing posts on PsychologyToday.com about gaslighting. They were often among the most popular posts, and I kept wondering, What the heck is "gaslighting"? Finally I Googled it and found a succinct definition: "to manipulate (someone) b... Last year I kept seeing posts on PsychologyToday.com about gaslighting. They were often among the most popular posts, and I kept wondering, What the heck is "gaslighting"? Finally I Googled it and found a succinct definition: "to manipulate (someone) by psychological means into questioning their own sanity."<br /> <br /> The most popular post is the first hit in a Google search for "gaslighting," and it was written by my guest for this week, Dr. Stephanie Sarkis: <br /> <br /> I was really happy to have the chance to dive into this topic with Stephanie, since she's clearly an authority on the subject. I read her new book entitled Gaslighting, and explored questions including:<br /> <br /> Where does the concept of gaslighting come from?<br /> What's the value in having a label for this pattern of behavior?<br /> Are gaslighters aware of what they're doing?<br /> How can we distinguish gaslighting from ordinary manipulation?<br /> How common are gaslighters?<br /> Why is it so hard to get away from a gaslighter?<br /> How can we avoid attracting gaslighters, such as on the dating scene?<br /> How can we recognize gaslighting before getting drawn into it?<br /> How can we manage the gaslighters in our families?<br /> <br /> If you're having a hard time picturing what gaslighting looks like, Stephanie provided an example in this Star Trek episode in which the bad guy tries to manipulate Patrick Stewart's character into denying what he sees. You can also check out the movie that gave the concept its name: 1944 movie "Gaslight."<br /> <br /> Image by Fred the Oyster<br /> <br /> In this episode I brought up a classic psychology study on conformity but blanked on the name of the researcher who did it during my conversation with Stephanie; it was done by psychologist Solomon Asch in the 1950s.<br /> <br /> Groups of participants were asked to judge the length of various lines. What each participant didn't realize was that they were the only real participant, and the rest of the people in the room were "confederates," meaning they were working with the experimenters.<br /> <br /> The study was designed to test how much people would go along with the other people in the room when they were giving answers that were clearly wrong. For example, for this example image all the confederates would say that line "B" was the same length as the single line on the left, when obviously line "A" is the correct match. Just kidding, line "C" is the correct answer. A surprising percentage of participants went along with the group, even though it meant denying what was right in front of them. I referenced the study because of the obvious distress it causes when others make us question our own reality. You can read the original study here: A Minority of One.<br /> <br /> I also referenced a recent podcast called "Dr. Death." I thought it was well done, but I would caution that it's a bit horrifying at times (as the title suggests...). Here's a link for more information about "Dr. Death" from Wondery.<br /> <br /> <br /> Dr. Stephanie Sarkis completed her PhD, MEd, and EdS in Mental Health Counseling from the University of Florida. She is a bestselling author of seven books, including her latest, Gaslighting: Recognize Manipulative and Emotionally Abusive People—and Break Free. Dr. Sarkis is an American Mental Health Counselors Association Diplomate and one of only twenty Clinical Mental Health Specialists in Child and Adolescent Counseling in the US.<br /> <br /> She is also a Florida Supreme Court Certified Family and Circuit Civil Mediator, as well as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and a National Certified Counselor. She maintains a private practice in Tampa, FL, where she specializes in gaslighting, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).<br /> <br /> Gaslighting is available for purchase from Amazon. (Please note this is an affiliate link, Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 51:24 Ep. 15: Dr. Richard Summers – Finding the Best Psychotherapy for Each Individual http://sethgillihan.com/ep-15-dr-richard-summers-finding-the-best-psychotherapy-for-each-individual/ Wed, 07 Nov 2018 05:01:55 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12645 There are many types of psychotherapy available, and it can be hard to know which one might be most helpful to an individual at a specific point in his or her life. In this week's episode I spoke with psychiatrist Dr. Richard Summers about an approach called psychodynamic (or dynamic) psychotherapy, which is a direct descendant of Sigmund Freud's school of thought. Rick has been practicing psychotherapy for many years, and has given a lot of thought to the nuances of therapy and what makes it effective. I've had several guests on the podcast who were cognitive behavioral therapists, and I was glad to get to speak with Rick about a very different approach. Dynamic therapy is widely used, and is what comes to mind when many people think of psychotherapy. Rick and I spoke about many issues related to the psychodynamic approach, and therapy more generally, including: The essential features of dynamic psychotherapy How psychodynamic therapy has evolved over the past several decades Strengths and limitations of different therapy approaches The complementary features of psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral (CBT) therapies The relationship between CBT and psychodynamic practitioners Surprising overlap between CBT and psychodynamic therapy Why our early experiences can have enduring effects throughout our lives The idea of a "life narrative" and its relation to psychodynamic therapy The combination of medication and psychotherapy How to find an excellent psychotherapist It was great to talk with Rick and to learn more about his perspective on psychotherapy, which I always find illuminating. I look forward to hearing your feedback about this episode. Richard F. Summers, MD, is Senior Residency Advisor and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Summers is a nationally recognized educator, author, and clinician. He is Trustee-at-Large on the Board of Trustees at the American Psychiatric Association, a Past President of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT), and a faculty member at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. He currently serves as Chair of the APA Workgroup on Psychiatrist Wellbeing and Burnout. Dr. Summers has written on psychodynamic therapy training, therapeutic alliance, psychodynamic formulation, positive psychology, and psychiatry residency training. He wrote Psychodynamic Therapy: A Guide to Evidence Based Practice with psychologist Jacques Barber, which is used in over thirty training programs. Drs. Summers and Barber wrote a second book together entitled Practicing Psychodynamic Therapy: A Casebook. Dr. Summers is also lead editor with Dilip V. Jeste, MD, of Positive Psychiatry: A Casebook. (Please note that these are affiliate links to the books, meaning a percentage of any sales through these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) Dr. Summers is the recipient of numerous awards including the Earl Bond Outstanding Teacher Award of the Department of Psychiatry at Penn, the Robert Dunning Dripps Award for Excellence in Graduate Medical Education from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Psychiatric Educator of the Year from the Philadelphia Psychiatric Society. He has been named Teacher of the Year by the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia and five times received the Outpatient Teacher of the Year Award in the Penn Department of Psychiatry. Most recently, he received the University of Pennsylvania Provost’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2014. He is a Philadelphia Magazine Top Doc. Dr. Summers’ clinical interests focus on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, and adult lifecycle development. His research interests include the contemporary revision of the theory and technique of psychodynamic psychotherapy and new approaches to psychotherapy tra... There are many types of psychotherapy available, and it can be hard to know which one might be most helpful to an individual at a specific point in his or her life. In this week's episode I spoke with psychiatrist Dr. There are many types of psychotherapy available, and it can be hard to know which one might be most helpful to an individual at a specific point in his or her life. In this week's episode I spoke with psychiatrist Dr. Richard Summers about an approach called psychodynamic (or dynamic) psychotherapy, which is a direct descendant of Sigmund Freud's school of thought.<br /> <br /> Rick has been practicing psychotherapy for many years, and has given a lot of thought to the nuances of therapy and what makes it effective. I've had several guests on the podcast who were cognitive behavioral therapists, and I was glad to get to speak with Rick about a very different approach. Dynamic therapy is widely used, and is what comes to mind when many people think of psychotherapy.<br /> <br /> Rick and I spoke about many issues related to the psychodynamic approach, and therapy more generally, including:<br /> <br /> The essential features of dynamic psychotherapy<br /> How psychodynamic therapy has evolved over the past several decades<br /> Strengths and limitations of different therapy approaches<br /> The complementary features of psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral (CBT) therapies<br /> The relationship between CBT and psychodynamic practitioners<br /> Surprising overlap between CBT and psychodynamic therapy<br /> Why our early experiences can have enduring effects throughout our lives<br /> The idea of a "life narrative" and its relation to psychodynamic therapy<br /> The combination of medication and psychotherapy<br /> How to find an excellent psychotherapist<br /> <br /> It was great to talk with Rick and to learn more about his perspective on psychotherapy, which I always find illuminating. I look forward to hearing your feedback about this episode.<br /> <br /> Richard F. Summers, MD, is Senior Residency Advisor and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Summers is a nationally recognized educator, author, and clinician. He is Trustee-at-Large on the Board of Trustees at the American Psychiatric Association, a Past President of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT), and a faculty member at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. He currently serves as Chair of the APA Workgroup on Psychiatrist Wellbeing and Burnout.<br /> <br /> Dr. Summers has written on psychodynamic therapy training, therapeutic alliance, psychodynamic formulation, positive psychology, and psychiatry residency training. He wrote Psychodynamic Therapy: A Guide to Evidence Based Practice with psychologist Jacques Barber, which is used in over thirty training programs. Drs. Summers and Barber wrote a second book together entitled Practicing Psychodynamic Therapy: A Casebook. Dr. Summers is also lead editor with Dilip V. Jeste, MD, of Positive Psychiatry: A Casebook. (Please note that these are affiliate links to the books, meaning a percentage of any sales through these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.)<br /> <br /> Dr. Summers is the recipient of numerous awards including the Earl Bond Outstanding Teacher Award of the Department of Psychiatry at Penn, the Robert Dunning Dripps Award for Excellence in Graduate Medical Education from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Psychiatric Educator of the Year from the Philadelphia Psychiatric Society. He has been named Teacher of the Year by the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia and five times received the Outpatient Teacher of the Year Award in the Penn Department of Psychiatry. Most recently, he received the University of Pennsylvania Provost’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2014. He is a Philadelphia Magazine Top Doc.<br /> <br /> Dr. Summers’ clinical interests focus on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, and adult lifecycle development. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 53:38 Ep. 14: Arlene B. Englander – How to Let Go of Emotional Overeating and Love Your Food http://sethgillihan.com/how-to-let-go-of-emotional-overeating-and-love-your-food/ Wed, 31 Oct 2018 04:01:50 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12630  Eating is one of life's most fundamental and pleasurable activities. However, many of us have a complicated relationship with food, particularly when we're prone to emotional overeating. We may be preoccupied with food on the one hand, and feel guilty for the kinds or amounts of food we eat on the other. Arlene B. Englander knows the ins and outs of emotional overeating, not only from her practice as a therapist but from her own history of a troubled relationship with food. She has distilled her personal and professional background into a new book entitled How to Let Go of Emotional Overeating and Love Your Food, which was the focus of our conversation in this week's episode. Topics we addressed included: How we can get more enjoyment out of eating The importance of loving our food Ways to manage emotions other than through eating The problems with the dieting mentality Whether it's best to avoid some foods entirely Thinking traps related to food Effects of early learning on our relationship with food Why it's so hard not to overeat at home, especially at night Whether emotional eating (not overeating) can ever be a healthy exercise (with reference to this book—and apologies to the author if I mischaracterized his approach at all) Arlene presents techniques that can provide not only emotional freedom at the table, but the ability to enjoy our lives more overall. I look forward to hearing what you think of this discussion. Arlene B. Englander, LCSW, MBA, has been a licensed psychotherapist for more than 20 years. She completed her training at Columbia University and has worked in diverse settings including Cancer Care, Inc., and American Express. She has created health promotion programs on stress management, emotional overeating, and other topics for hospitals, corporations, and law firms. Arlene presents her "Love Your Food"® seminars at organizations throughout her South Florida community. Her private practice is in North Palm Beach, FL, where she specializes in treating emotional overeating. To learn more about Arlene and her work, check out her website. Her book is available on Amazon. (Please note: This is an affiliate link, meaning a percentage of sales from the link will be used to support this podcast, at no additional cost to you.)  Eating is one of life's most fundamental and pleasurable activities. However, many of us have a complicated relationship with food, particularly when we're prone to emotional overeating. We may be preoccupied with food on the one hand, <br /> Eating is one of life's most fundamental and pleasurable activities. However, many of us have a complicated relationship with food, particularly when we're prone to emotional overeating. We may be preoccupied with food on the one hand, and feel guilty for the kinds or amounts of food we eat on the other.<br /> <br /> Arlene B. Englander knows the ins and outs of emotional overeating, not only from her practice as a therapist but from her own history of a troubled relationship with food. She has distilled her personal and professional background into a new book entitled How to Let Go of Emotional Overeating and Love Your Food, which was the focus of our conversation in this week's episode.<br /> <br /> Topics we addressed included:<br /> <br /> How we can get more enjoyment out of eating<br /> The importance of loving our food<br /> Ways to manage emotions other than through eating<br /> The problems with the dieting mentality<br /> Whether it's best to avoid some foods entirely<br /> Thinking traps related to food<br /> Effects of early learning on our relationship with food<br /> Why it's so hard not to overeat at home, especially at night<br /> Whether emotional eating (not overeating) can ever be a healthy exercise (with reference to this book—and apologies to the author if I mischaracterized his approach at all)<br /> <br /> Arlene presents techniques that can provide not only emotional freedom at the table, but the ability to enjoy our lives more overall. I look forward to hearing what you think of this discussion.<br /> <br /> Arlene B. Englander, LCSW, MBA, has been a licensed psychotherapist for more than 20 years. She completed her training at Columbia University and has worked in diverse settings including Cancer Care, Inc., and American Express. She has created health promotion programs on stress management, emotional overeating, and other topics for hospitals, corporations, and law firms. Arlene presents her "Love Your Food"® seminars at organizations throughout her South Florida community. Her private practice is in North Palm Beach, FL, where she specializes in treating emotional overeating.<br /> <br /> To learn more about Arlene and her work, check out her website.<br /> <br /> Her book is available on Amazon. (Please note: This is an affiliate link, meaning a percentage of sales from the link will be used to support this podcast, at no additional cost to you.) Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 50:31 Ep. 13: Dr. Rob DeRubeis — Latest Research from the Frontier of Depression Treatment http://sethgillihan.com/ep-13-dr-rob-derubeis-latest-research-from-the-frontier-of-depression-treatment/ Wed, 24 Oct 2018 04:01:34 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12614 There’s a lot of “received wisdom” in the field of depression treatment, such as: Medication is more powerful than talk therapy. Psychotherapy plus medication is the best treatment approach. Depression is caused by a “chemical imbalance” involving low serotonin. Antidepressant medication is better than placebo for most people with depression. Are these ideas well-supported by research data? To explore these issues I spoke with Dr. Rob DeRubeis, a clinical psychologist and expert in depression research. Rob’s work has challenged many of the established beliefs in this field, and has sharpened my own thinking in these areas. Our discussion spanned multiple decades of Rob’s work as his and others’ research refined our understanding of depression and the best ways to treat it. In this episode we explored: The different types of depression Potential negative side effects of medication and psychotherapy The likelihood that depression will return after the first episode Patient preference for psychotherapy versus medication Possible downsides of combining medication and therapy for depression The difficulty in following through on a therapy referral How to make the best cognitive behavioral treatments more readily available Applying precision medicine to the treatment of depression How Rob applies to principles of CBT in his own life As you'll find from our discussion, Rob thinks very carefully and clearly about these ideas, and is skilled at explaining important nuances that shouldn't be ignored. You'll also learn about the history of the depression treatment field, and the evolution in our understanding of depression and how to treat it. If you'd like to learn more about the topics Rob and I discuss, check out these videos: The Treatment of Depression: What Works, When, and and Why Medication of Sadness Moderation in All Things: A Call to Focus on Individual Differences in Mental Health Treatment Research Here are links to some of the relevant articles we discussed so you can see the data yourself: The 1999 study showing that medication and CBT were equally effective in treating severe depression: Medications Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severely Depressed Outpatients: Mega-Analysis of Four Randomized Comparisons The 2005 study comparing CBT, an SSRI medication, and pill placebo: Cognitive Therapy vs Medications in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression The companion piece showing that CBT was more effective than SSRI medication at preventing depression relapse: Prevention of Relapse Following Cognitive Therapy vs Medications in Moderate to Severe Depression The 2010 JAMA study showing that antidepressants on average are better than placebo only at severe levels of depression: Antidepressant Drug Effects and Depression Severity: A Patient-Level Meta-Analysis And an explanation of the issues involved in applying precision medicine to depression treatment: Treatment Selection in Depression Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, is the Samuel H. Preston Term Professor in the psychology department at the University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as the Director of Clinical Training. His work has shaped the field of modern depression treatment research, and has been supported by multiple major grants from the National Institute of Mental Health. Rob has authored over 125 peer-reviewed publications, as well as countless book chapters and conference presentations. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the Aaron T. Beck Award from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy for significant and enduring contributions to cognitive therapy; the Distinguished Career Award from the Society for Psychotherapy Research; the Provost’s Award for Distinguished PhD Teaching and Mentoring at the University of Pennsylvania; as well as the James McKean Cattell Fellow Award from the Association for Psychological Science for a lifetime of outstandin... There’s a lot of “received wisdom” in the field of depression treatment, such as: Medication is more powerful than talk therapy. Psychotherapy plus medication is the best treatment approach. Depression is caused by a “chemical imbalance” inv... There’s a lot of “received wisdom” in the field of depression treatment, such as:<br /> <br /> Medication is more powerful than talk therapy.<br /> Psychotherapy plus medication is the best treatment approach.<br /> Depression is caused by a “chemical imbalance” involving low serotonin.<br /> Antidepressant medication is better than placebo for most people with depression.<br /> <br /> Are these ideas well-supported by research data? To explore these issues I spoke with Dr. Rob DeRubeis, a clinical psychologist and expert in depression research. Rob’s work has challenged many of the established beliefs in this field, and has sharpened my own thinking in these areas.<br /> <br /> Our discussion spanned multiple decades of Rob’s work as his and others’ research refined our understanding of depression and the best ways to treat it. In this episode we explored:<br /> <br /> The different types of depression<br /> Potential negative side effects of medication and psychotherapy<br /> The likelihood that depression will return after the first episode<br /> Patient preference for psychotherapy versus medication<br /> Possible downsides of combining medication and therapy for depression<br /> The difficulty in following through on a therapy referral<br /> How to make the best cognitive behavioral treatments more readily available<br /> Applying precision medicine to the treatment of depression<br /> How Rob applies to principles of CBT in his own life<br /> <br /> As you'll find from our discussion, Rob thinks very carefully and clearly about these ideas, and is skilled at explaining important nuances that shouldn't be ignored. You'll also learn about the history of the depression treatment field, and the evolution in our understanding of depression and how to treat it.<br /> <br /> If you'd like to learn more about the topics Rob and I discuss, check out these videos:<br /> <br /> The Treatment of Depression: What Works, When, and and Why<br /> <br /> Medication of Sadness<br /> <br /> Moderation in All Things: A Call to Focus on Individual Differences in Mental Health Treatment Research<br /> <br /> Here are links to some of the relevant articles we discussed so you can see the data yourself:<br /> <br /> The 1999 study showing that medication and CBT were equally effective in treating severe depression: Medications Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severely Depressed Outpatients: Mega-Analysis of Four Randomized Comparisons<br /> The 2005 study comparing CBT, an SSRI medication, and pill placebo: Cognitive Therapy vs Medications in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression<br /> The companion piece showing that CBT was more effective than SSRI medication at preventing depression relapse: Prevention of Relapse Following Cognitive Therapy vs Medications in Moderate to Severe Depression<br /> The 2010 JAMA study showing that antidepressants on average are better than placebo only at severe levels of depression: Antidepressant Drug Effects and Depression Severity: A Patient-Level Meta-Analysis<br /> And an explanation of the issues involved in applying precision medicine to depression treatment: Treatment Selection in Depression<br /> <br /> Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, is the Samuel H. Preston Term Professor in the psychology department at the University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as the Director of Clinical Training. His work has shaped the field of modern depression treatment research, and has been supported by multiple major grants from the National Institute of Mental Health.<br /> <br /> Rob has authored over 125 peer-reviewed publications, as well as countless book chapters and conference presentations. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the Aaron T. Beck Award from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy for significant and enduring contributions to cognitive therapy; the Distinguished Career Award from the Society for Ps... Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:42:36 Ep. 12: Dr. David Richo – The Mindful Path Toward Greater Love and Connection http://sethgillihan.com/ep-12-dr-david-richo-the-mindful-path-toward-greater-love-and-connection/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 04:01:19 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12604 Relationships are the biggest factor in our well-being, and yet we often struggle to have the quality of connections that we need. In this episode I talk with Dr. David Richo about his excellent book, How to Be an Adult in Relationships: The 5 Keys to Mindful Loving. As we discussed, mindful loving consists of what Dave calls "the Five A's": attention, acceptance, appreciation, affection, and allowing. When we provide these essential ingredients, we help others (and ourselves) feel valued and loved. Dave and I talked about several important related issues, including: The role of our early relationships in shaping our experience of love The connection between self-love and love of others What prevents us from giving and receiving love The ability of loving relationships to heal earlier wounds The importance of the spiritual in our closest relationships The challenge of self-loathing The impact of technology on our relationships Related books that he has written I got so much out of How to Be an Adult in Relationships, and was really grateful that Dave agreed to come on the podcast. I hope you get a lot out of our discussion. David Richo, PhD, MFT, is a psychotherapist, teacher, workshop leader, and writer who works in Santa Barbara and San Francisco, CA. He combines Jungian, poetic, and mythic perspectives in his work with the intention of integrating the psychological and the spiritual. His books and workshops draw from Buddhist and Christian spiritual practices. You can find Dave online at his website. David is the author of 20 books, including three we discuss in this episode: How to Be an Adult in Relationships How to Be an Adult in Love The Five Things We Cannot Change (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a small percentage of sales from these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) Relationships are the biggest factor in our well-being, and yet we often struggle to have the quality of connections that we need. In this episode I talk with Dr. David Richo about his excellent book, How to Be an Adult in Relationships: The 5 Keys to ... Relationships are the biggest factor in our well-being, and yet we often struggle to have the quality of connections that we need. In this episode I talk with Dr. David Richo about his excellent book, How to Be an Adult in Relationships: The 5 Keys to Mindful Loving.<br /> <br /> As we discussed, mindful loving consists of what Dave calls "the Five A's": attention, acceptance, appreciation, affection, and allowing. When we provide these essential ingredients, we help others (and ourselves) feel valued and loved.<br /> <br /> Dave and I talked about several important related issues, including:<br /> <br /> The role of our early relationships in shaping our experience of love<br /> The connection between self-love and love of others<br /> What prevents us from giving and receiving love<br /> The ability of loving relationships to heal earlier wounds<br /> The importance of the spiritual in our closest relationships<br /> The challenge of self-loathing<br /> The impact of technology on our relationships<br /> Related books that he has written<br /> <br /> I got so much out of How to Be an Adult in Relationships, and was really grateful that Dave agreed to come on the podcast. I hope you get a lot out of our discussion.<br /> <br /> David Richo, PhD, MFT, is a psychotherapist, teacher, workshop leader, and writer who works in Santa Barbara and San Francisco, CA. He combines Jungian, poetic, and mythic perspectives in his work with the intention of integrating the psychological and the spiritual. His books and workshops draw from Buddhist and Christian spiritual practices.<br /> <br /> You can find Dave online at his website.<br /> <br /> David is the author of 20 books, including three we discuss in this episode:<br /> <br /> How to Be an Adult in Relationships<br /> How to Be an Adult in Love<br /> The Five Things We Cannot Change<br /> <br /> (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a small percentage of sales from these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 49:26 Ep. 11: Dr. Alice Boyes — How to Create the Best Life Possible, One Habit at a Time http://sethgillihan.com/ep-11-dr-alice-boyes-how-to-create-the-best-life-possible-one-habit-at-a-time/ Wed, 10 Oct 2018 04:01:20 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12591 Author Alice Boyes wants to help you stop getting in your own way. She recently wrote a book called The Healthy Mind Toolkit, which addresses the many ways all of us fall prey at times to self-sabotage. By recognizing these patterns, we can take steps to think and act more adaptively. Alice presents powerful strategies that draw on research in social psychology and the proven tools of mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy. In this week's episode we discuss her recent book, including: What self-sabotage is What leads to perfectionism How to resist perfectionistic tendencies How to arrange your life to stop wasting time and energy How to find the mental space and energy to break unhelpful habits Simple strategies to improve your life, like batch actions and master lists The surprisingly big effect of making small improvements I met Alice through PsychologyToday.com, where she and I are both regular bloggers. She has a gift for providing really useful techniques for improving your life, in ways you haven't even thought of. These techniques are really simple and straightforward, and are things you can start using today. As you'll hear in our discussion, I've been incorporating many of these ideas into my own life. I hope you enjoy our discussion. Dr. Alice Boyes trained as a clinical psychologist in New Zealand, where she completed her PhD. The e-book for her first book, The Anxiety Toolkit, made the Wall Street Journal bestseller list. Alice's blog posts on Psychology Today have received over 11 million views. She's a gifted writer and thinker, and a sought-after guest blogger. Find Alice online at AliceBoyes.com. Her Psychology Today blog is called In Practice. You can check out her posts for Harvard Business Review through this link. Both of Alice's books are available for purchase from Amazon: The Anxiety Toolkit The Healthy Mind Toolkit (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a small percentage of sales from these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) Author Alice Boyes wants to help you stop getting in your own way. She recently wrote a book called The Healthy Mind Toolkit, which addresses the many ways all of us fall prey at times to self-sabotage. By recognizing these patterns, Author Alice Boyes wants to help you stop getting in your own way. She recently wrote a book called The Healthy Mind Toolkit, which addresses the many ways all of us fall prey at times to self-sabotage. By recognizing these patterns, we can take steps to think and act more adaptively. Alice presents powerful strategies that draw on research in social psychology and the proven tools of mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy.<br /> <br /> In this week's episode we discuss her recent book, including:<br /> <br /> What self-sabotage is<br /> What leads to perfectionism<br /> How to resist perfectionistic tendencies<br /> How to arrange your life to stop wasting time and energy<br /> How to find the mental space and energy to break unhelpful habits<br /> Simple strategies to improve your life, like batch actions and master lists<br /> The surprisingly big effect of making small improvements<br /> <br /> I met Alice through PsychologyToday.com, where she and I are both regular bloggers. She has a gift for providing really useful techniques for improving your life, in ways you haven't even thought of. These techniques are really simple and straightforward, and are things you can start using today. As you'll hear in our discussion, I've been incorporating many of these ideas into my own life. I hope you enjoy our discussion.<br /> <br /> Dr. Alice Boyes trained as a clinical psychologist in New Zealand, where she completed her PhD. The e-book for her first book, The Anxiety Toolkit, made the Wall Street Journal bestseller list. Alice's blog posts on Psychology Today have received over 11 million views. She's a gifted writer and thinker, and a sought-after guest blogger.<br /> <br /> Find Alice online at AliceBoyes.com.<br /> <br /> Her Psychology Today blog is called In Practice.<br /> <br /> You can check out her posts for Harvard Business Review through this link.<br /> <br /> Both of Alice's books are available for purchase from Amazon:<br /> <br /> The Anxiety Toolkit<br /> The Healthy Mind Toolkit<br /> <br /> (Please note that these are affiliate links, meaning a small percentage of sales from these links will be used to support the podcast, at no additional charge to you.) Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:12:02 Ep. 10: Dr. Matt Kayser – Using Powerful Animal Models to Help Humans Sleep Better http://sethgillihan.com/ep-10-dr-matt-kayser-using-powerful-animal-models-to-help-humans-sleep-better/ Wed, 03 Oct 2018 04:01:52 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12578 What can we learn about human sleep from studying fruit flies? A lot more than you might think, as psychiatrist and researcher Matt Kayser explains this week. Matt and his colleagues are deepening our understanding of what drives the profound changes in sleep patterns across development—for example, newborns sleep all the time (except when their parents want them to), college students become nocturnal, and aging adults struggle to sleep soundly. His research promises to reveal the pathways in the brain that drive these shifts, and the effects of poor sleep on the developing brain. Matt and I discussed some of his recent research, as well as general principles in this area. Topics we covered included: The striking similarities in sleep across most species Why fruit flies are an especially good model for studying sleep Why we sleep, given the obvious downsides How and why sleep changes across development Why sleep deprivation early in life may have long-lasting effects The surprising advantages of spending less time in bed Implications of poor sleep on the aging brain The effects of mindfulness practice on insomnia If you're interested in the original research articles we discuss, you can find them through these links: A Sleep State in Drosophila Larvae Required for Neural Stem Cell Proliferation A Critical Period of Sleep for Development of Courtship Circuitry and Behavior in Drosophila The study on amyloid beta with implications for Alzheimer's Disease is still in the works. Dr. Matt Kayser completed his MD and PhD at the University of Pennsylvania where his research focused on the development of synapses (the connections that allow nerve cells to communicate with each other) in mammals. He continued at Penn for his psychiatric residency and in a research postdoc with Dr. Amita Sehgal using Drosophila (fruit flies) to examine how neural circuits give rise to complex behaviors—particularly sleep and brain function. He is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the creator and director of the Sleep Mental Health Clinic at Penn. Learn more about Matt at his lab page: Kayser Lab. To schedule an appointment in his Sleep Mental Health clinic, call 215-898-4301. What can we learn about human sleep from studying fruit flies? A lot more than you might think, as psychiatrist and researcher Matt Kayser explains this week. - Matt and his colleagues are deepening our understanding of what drives the profound change... What can we learn about human sleep from studying fruit flies? A lot more than you might think, as psychiatrist and researcher Matt Kayser explains this week.<br /> <br /> Matt and his colleagues are deepening our understanding of what drives the profound changes in sleep patterns across development—for example, newborns sleep all the time (except when their parents want them to), college students become nocturnal, and aging adults struggle to sleep soundly. His research promises to reveal the pathways in the brain that drive these shifts, and the effects of poor sleep on the developing brain.<br /> <br /> Matt and I discussed some of his recent research, as well as general principles in this area. Topics we covered included:<br /> <br /> The striking similarities in sleep across most species<br /> Why fruit flies are an especially good model for studying sleep<br /> Why we sleep, given the obvious downsides<br /> How and why sleep changes across development<br /> Why sleep deprivation early in life may have long-lasting effects<br /> The surprising advantages of spending less time in bed<br /> Implications of poor sleep on the aging brain<br /> The effects of mindfulness practice on insomnia<br /> <br /> If you're interested in the original research articles we discuss, you can find them through these links:<br /> <br /> A Sleep State in Drosophila Larvae Required for Neural Stem Cell Proliferation<br /> <br /> A Critical Period of Sleep for Development of Courtship Circuitry and Behavior in Drosophila<br /> <br /> The study on amyloid beta with implications for Alzheimer's Disease is still in the works.<br /> <br /> Dr. Matt Kayser completed his MD and PhD at the University of Pennsylvania where his research focused on the development of synapses (the connections that allow nerve cells to communicate with each other) in mammals. He continued at Penn for his psychiatric residency and in a research postdoc with Dr. Amita Sehgal using Drosophila (fruit flies) to examine how neural circuits give rise to complex behaviors—particularly sleep and brain function. He is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the creator and director of the Sleep Mental Health Clinic at Penn.<br /> <br /> Learn more about Matt at his lab page: Kayser Lab.<br /> <br /> To schedule an appointment in his Sleep Mental Health clinic, call 215-898-4301. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:02:00 Ep. 9: Dr. Ben Hunter – Love and Relationships Through the Lens of Attachment http://sethgillihan.com/ep-9-dr-ben-hunter-love-and-relationships-through-the-lens-of-attachment/ Wed, 26 Sep 2018 04:01:33 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12563 Each of us has a predominant way of connecting with others, which relationship scientists call our attachment style. It's exactly what it sounds like—our habitual way of relating to people. Some of us seem to have an easy time in relationships, enjoying connecting to the people around us, while others are wary of getting too close, even to romantic partners. Still others have a hard time feeling secure in their relationships, always craving a closer connection and worrying that they'll be abandoned. Maybe you identify with one of these patterns. In my conversation this week with psychiatrist Dr. Ben Hunter, we discuss the different attachment styles and where they come from. Attachment is a pretty simple idea but it has powerful implications for understanding our relationships, from our very earliest with our mothers and fathers, through dating and committed relationships, as well as other kinds of connections. Ben and I discuss many issues related to attachment, including: The original research that revealed attachment style The contribution of nature and nurture The consistency in attachment from childhood through adulthood Interactions between attachment styles The possibility of changing attachment style The intersection of attachment style and social media Attachment style in psychotherapy I always enjoy thinking about attachment because it can open our eyes to patterns in the ways we relate to others that we might easily miss, because we're so used to them. For example, we might notice that we instinctively withdraw from relationships that feel too close, and perhaps recognize experiences from our early life that explain our current reactions. By learning to recognize these kinds of patterns, we can start to make more deliberate choices about how we connect to those around us. I hope you enjoy our conversation. Dr. Ben Hunter is the Medical Director of Outpatient Services at Skyland Trail, a residential treatment center in Atlanta, GA. He was an All-American pitcher on Wake Forest University’s baseball team, and was selected in the Major League Baseball draft but ultimately decided he was called to medicine. Ben completed his medical training at Emory University followed by a psychiatric residency at Penn, which is where I met him when I was his cognitive behavioral therapy supervisor for a year. He was named chief resident during his final year. Ben's work has been recognized with the University of Pennsylvania’s Laughlin Foundation Award for outstanding professional achievement as well as the Kenneth D. Cohen Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Award. Find Ben on Instagram at benhuntermd and on the web at Skyland Trail; the admissions number is 866-504-4966. Each of us has a predominant way of connecting with others, which relationship scientists call our attachment style. It's exactly what it sounds like—our habitual way of relating to people. Some of us seem to have an easy time in relationships, Each of us has a predominant way of connecting with others, which relationship scientists call our attachment style. It's exactly what it sounds like—our habitual way of relating to people. Some of us seem to have an easy time in relationships, enjoying connecting to the people around us, while others are wary of getting too close, even to romantic partners. Still others have a hard time feeling secure in their relationships, always craving a closer connection and worrying that they'll be abandoned. Maybe you identify with one of these patterns.<br /> <br /> In my conversation this week with psychiatrist Dr. Ben Hunter, we discuss the different attachment styles and where they come from. Attachment is a pretty simple idea but it has powerful implications for understanding our relationships, from our very earliest with our mothers and fathers, through dating and committed relationships, as well as other kinds of connections.<br /> <br /> Ben and I discuss many issues related to attachment, including:<br /> <br /> The original research that revealed attachment style<br /> The contribution of nature and nurture<br /> The consistency in attachment from childhood through adulthood<br /> Interactions between attachment styles<br /> The possibility of changing attachment style<br /> The intersection of attachment style and social media<br /> Attachment style in psychotherapy<br /> <br /> I always enjoy thinking about attachment because it can open our eyes to patterns in the ways we relate to others that we might easily miss, because we're so used to them. For example, we might notice that we instinctively withdraw from relationships that feel too close, and perhaps recognize experiences from our early life that explain our current reactions. By learning to recognize these kinds of patterns, we can start to make more deliberate choices about how we connect to those around us. I hope you enjoy our conversation.<br /> <br /> <br /> Dr. Ben Hunter is the Medical Director of Outpatient Services at Skyland Trail, a residential treatment center in Atlanta, GA. He was an All-American pitcher on Wake Forest University’s baseball team, and was selected in the Major League Baseball draft but ultimately decided he was called to medicine. Ben completed his medical training at Emory University followed by a psychiatric residency at Penn, which is where I met him when I was his cognitive behavioral therapy supervisor for a year. He was named chief resident during his final year. Ben's work has been recognized with the University of Pennsylvania’s Laughlin Foundation Award for outstanding professional achievement as well as the Kenneth D. Cohen Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Award.<br /> <br /> Find Ben on Instagram at benhuntermd and on the web at Skyland Trail; the admissions number is 866-504-4966. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:27:32 Ep. 8: Mark Moliterno – Strengthening the Voice Through Mind, Body, and Spirit http://sethgillihan.com/ep-8-mark-moliterno-strengthening-the-voice-through-mind-body-and-spirit/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 04:01:37 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12552 The voice is our primary way of expressing ourselves, and vocal problems can have a profound impact on our well-being and relationships. If you've ever been unable to speak for a while, like during laryngitis, you know how challenging it is not to have a voice. I found out for myself just how important the voice is when I experienced vocal difficulties that turned out to be related to a benign growth in my larynx. I had surgery to remove the growth, and then completed vocal training to practice more effective ways to speak and prevent recurrence of the problem. My vocal therapist recommended I pursue additional training to integrate the body and the voice, which led me to Mark Moliterno. Mark has developed a unique blend of vocal training and yoga therapy called YogaVoice®. As we discuss in this week's episode, the voice doesn't begin or end in the throat; it involves the entire body, from our feet to our heads, as well as our minds and energy. Mark has a gift for teaching, as you'll hear in this episode. He treats the whole person, not just the voice, and greater vocal strength and integrity are one of the important results of that work. I'm deeply grateful for the work I've done with him. In this episode we explore: The role of the voice in our self-identity What the quality of our voice can reveal about us The connection between the voice and the body The effects of stress and trauma on the voice How the chakra system relates to the voice How Mark developed the YogaVoice® program Mark's background in professional singing and yoga instruction Mark Moliterno, MM, has extensive experience in both voice and yoga. He is an accomplished professional opera singer as well as a voice and yoga teacher, certified Yoga Therapist, workshop leader, and author. He specializes in helping people understand and overcome blockages to their authentic voices, both physical and energetic. Mark holds bachelor's and master's degrees in voice and opera from the Oberlin Conservatory of music; he completed additional musical studies at Rutgers University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Study in Aldeburgh, England, and the Hochschüle für Musik, Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. Mark is a longstanding member of the voice faculty at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ, and also maintains private voice and yoga therapy studios in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania. In addition to his career as a performer and educator, Mark is a Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher and an IAYT-certified Yoga Therapist. He presents YogaVoice® workshops at professional conferences and gatherings nationally and internationally. Mark has published articles in YogaLiving Magazine and The Journal of Singing; is co-author of The Musician’s Breath; and is the author and featured instructor of The Musician’s Breath Yoga DVD. His work related to overcoming performance anxiety was featured in an article entitled "How to Be Fearless" in the May 2014 Yoga Journal magazine. For a description of Mark's approach from a singer who worked with him, check out this article: Learning to sing: lessons from a yogi voice teacher. Find Mark online at his YogaVoice® website. The voice is our primary way of expressing ourselves, and vocal problems can have a profound impact on our well-being and relationships. If you've ever been unable to speak for a while, like during laryngitis, The voice is our primary way of expressing ourselves, and vocal problems can have a profound impact on our well-being and relationships. If you've ever been unable to speak for a while, like during laryngitis, you know how challenging it is not to have a voice.<br /> <br /> I found out for myself just how important the voice is when I experienced vocal difficulties that turned out to be related to a benign growth in my larynx. I had surgery to remove the growth, and then completed vocal training to practice more effective ways to speak and prevent recurrence of the problem. My vocal therapist recommended I pursue additional training to integrate the body and the voice, which led me to Mark Moliterno.<br /> <br /> Mark has developed a unique blend of vocal training and yoga therapy called YogaVoice®. As we discuss in this week's episode, the voice doesn't begin or end in the throat; it involves the entire body, from our feet to our heads, as well as our minds and energy.<br /> <br /> Mark has a gift for teaching, as you'll hear in this episode. He treats the whole person, not just the voice, and greater vocal strength and integrity are one of the important results of that work. I'm deeply grateful for the work I've done with him.<br /> <br /> In this episode we explore:<br /> <br /> The role of the voice in our self-identity<br /> What the quality of our voice can reveal about us<br /> The connection between the voice and the body<br /> The effects of stress and trauma on the voice<br /> How the chakra system relates to the voice<br /> How Mark developed the YogaVoice® program<br /> Mark's background in professional singing and yoga instruction<br /> <br /> Mark Moliterno, MM, has extensive experience in both voice and yoga. He is an accomplished professional opera singer as well as a voice and yoga teacher, certified Yoga Therapist, workshop leader, and author. He specializes in helping people understand and overcome blockages to their authentic voices, both physical and energetic.<br /> <br /> Mark holds bachelor's and master's degrees in voice and opera from the Oberlin Conservatory of music; he completed additional musical studies at Rutgers University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Study in Aldeburgh, England, and the Hochschüle für Musik, Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria.<br /> <br /> Mark is a longstanding member of the voice faculty at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ, and also maintains private voice and yoga therapy studios in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania.<br /> <br /> In addition to his career as a performer and educator, Mark is a Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher and an IAYT-certified Yoga Therapist. He presents YogaVoice® workshops at professional conferences and gatherings nationally and internationally. Mark has published articles in YogaLiving Magazine and The Journal of Singing; is co-author of The Musician’s Breath; and is the author and featured instructor of The Musician’s Breath Yoga DVD. His work related to overcoming performance anxiety was featured in an article entitled "How to Be Fearless" in the May 2014 Yoga Journal magazine.<br /> <br /> For a description of Mark's approach from a singer who worked with him, check out this article: Learning to sing: lessons from a yogi voice teacher.<br /> <br /> Find Mark online at his YogaVoice® website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:23:00 Ep. 7: Dr. Michael Perlis — The Latest Research on Sleep and Insomnia http://sethgillihan.com/ep-7-dr-michael-perlis-the-latest-research-on-sleep-and-insomnia/ Tue, 11 Sep 2018 04:01:22 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12499 Countless individuals are looking for the answer to their persistent sleep problems. Thanks to Dr. Michael Perlis, many of them are finding it. Michael is a psychologist and sleep specialist at the University of Pennsylvania. He and his colleagues wrote a fantastic treatment manual for cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), the first-line treatment for insomnia. If you have insomnia and haven't tried any treatment for it, start with CBT-I. If you've tried everything else without much relief, try CBT-I. As you'll hear in our discussion, Michael is working to better understand human sleep: How much sleep do we really need? Why do so many of us struggle with insomnia? What's the most effective insomnia treatment? Why does stress disrupt sleep?  How does chronic insomnia develop? What role can medication play in treating insomnia? Why is it best to get out of bed when we can't sleep? Is sleep hygiene an effective treatment for insomnia?  Michael lives close to the data as he works to build an empirical science of sleep. At the same time, he's willing to make intriguing hypotheses about sleep based on the available evidence. For example, he wonders if a fundamental shift in how sleep medications are prescribed may be more effective, as he and I discuss. Michael has a rich understanding of sleep and insomnia, so I'm looking forward to continuing our conversation in a follow-up podcast. I'll provide more information later but I'll be soliciting your questions about sleep and insomnia, which I'll then pose to Michael in our next discussion. Michael L. Perlis, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and Director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at Penn. He is recognized internationally for his expertise in Behavioral Sleep Medicine and has co-authored multiple pioneering books in the field, including Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia: A Sessions-by-Session Guide*. Michael is the author of over 150 articles and book chapters on sleep and he serves on the editorial board of several sleep journals. He was one of the five organizing and founding members of the Society of Behavioral Sleep Medicine (SBSM), and served as the SBSM’s first president (2010-2011). Learn more about Michael and his work at Penn's Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program website.   *This is an affiliate link, meaning that a small percentage of any purchases made through the link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to the buyer. Countless individuals are looking for the answer to their persistent sleep problems. Thanks to Dr. Michael Perlis, many of them are finding it. - Michael is a psychologist and sleep specialist at the University of Pennsylvania. Countless individuals are looking for the answer to their persistent sleep problems. Thanks to Dr. Michael Perlis, many of them are finding it.<br /> <br /> Michael is a psychologist and sleep specialist at the University of Pennsylvania. He and his colleagues wrote a fantastic treatment manual for cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), the first-line treatment for insomnia.<br /> <br /> If you have insomnia and haven't tried any treatment for it, start with CBT-I. If you've tried everything else without much relief, try CBT-I.<br /> <br /> As you'll hear in our discussion, Michael is working to better understand human sleep:<br /> <br /> How much sleep do we really need? <br /> Why do so many of us struggle with insomnia? <br /> What's the most effective insomnia treatment? <br /> Why does stress disrupt sleep? <br /> How does chronic insomnia develop?<br /> What role can medication play in treating insomnia?<br /> Why is it best to get out of bed when we can't sleep?<br /> Is sleep hygiene an effective treatment for insomnia? <br /> <br /> Michael lives close to the data as he works to build an empirical science of sleep. At the same time, he's willing to make intriguing hypotheses about sleep based on the available evidence. For example, he wonders if a fundamental shift in how sleep medications are prescribed may be more effective, as he and I discuss.<br /> <br /> Michael has a rich understanding of sleep and insomnia, so I'm looking forward to continuing our conversation in a follow-up podcast. I'll provide more information later but I'll be soliciting your questions about sleep and insomnia, which I'll then pose to Michael in our next discussion.<br /> <br /> Michael L. Perlis, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and Director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at Penn. He is recognized internationally for his expertise in Behavioral Sleep Medicine and has co-authored multiple pioneering books in the field, including Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia: A Sessions-by-Session Guide*.<br /> <br /> Michael is the author of over 150 articles and book chapters on sleep and he serves on the editorial board of several sleep journals. He was one of the five organizing and founding members of the Society of Behavioral Sleep Medicine (SBSM), and served as the SBSM’s first president (2010-2011).<br /> <br /> Learn more about Michael and his work at Penn's Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program website.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> *This is an affiliate link, meaning that a small percentage of any purchases made through the link will be used to support the podcast, at no additional cost to the buyer. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:17:59 Ep. 6: Dr. Angela Duckworth – How to Find a Passion That Inspires Extraordinary Effort http://sethgillihan.com/ep-6-dr-angela-duckworth-how-to-find-a-passion-that-inspires-extraordinary-effort/ Sat, 01 Sep 2018 11:03:06 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12537 Psychologist Angela Duckworth's research on grit is challenging the widely held assumption that talent is the most important determinant of success. Angela defines grit as "perseverance and passion for long-term goals," and has found that it's closely related to achievement in a wide range of fields. Angela summarized what her research has revealed in her book entitled Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. Angela is forthcoming in her book—and in our discussion—about how her personal experiences have informed her understanding of grit. In this episode we discuss how hard work is only half of the grit equation, and that finding one's passion is just as important. We also explore how to go about finding your passion, which can be the most challenging part of building grit. Grit is now available in paperback and can be purchased on Amazon (please note this is an affiliate link, meaning a percentage of the sale will support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional expense to you): Photo: University of Pennsylvania Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance Angela Lee Duckworth, PhD, is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, and Founder and CEO of Character Lab, a nonprofit with a mission to advance the science and practice of character development. Angela has given a TED Talk and is a MacArthur Fellow (better known as the "Genius Grant"). She has advised the World Bank, the White House, NBA and NFL teams, and Fortune 500 CEOs. Her first book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, is a #1 New York Times best seller. Learn more about Angela and her work and access free resources at her Character Lab website. Psychologist Angela Duckworth's research on grit is challenging the widely held assumption that talent is the most important determinant of success. Angela defines grit as "perseverance and passion for long-term goals, Psychologist Angela Duckworth's research on grit is challenging the widely held assumption that talent is the most important determinant of success. Angela defines grit as "perseverance and passion for long-term goals," and has found that it's closely related to achievement in a wide range of fields.<br /> <br /> Angela summarized what her research has revealed in her book entitled Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. Angela is forthcoming in her book—and in our discussion—about how her personal experiences have informed her understanding of grit.<br /> <br /> In this episode we discuss how hard work is only half of the grit equation, and that finding one's passion is just as important. We also explore how to go about finding your passion, which can be the most challenging part of building grit.<br /> <br /> Grit is now available in paperback and can be purchased on Amazon (please note this is an affiliate link, meaning a percentage of the sale will support the Think Act Be podcast, at no additional expense to you):<br /> <br /> Photo: University of Pennsylvania<br /> <br /> Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance<br /> <br /> Angela Lee Duckworth, PhD, is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, and Founder and CEO of Character Lab, a nonprofit with a mission to advance the science and practice of character development.<br /> <br /> Angela has given a TED Talk and is a MacArthur Fellow (better known as the "Genius Grant"). She has advised the World Bank, the White House, NBA and NFL teams, and Fortune 500 CEOs. Her first book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, is a #1 New York Times best seller.<br /> <br /> Learn more about Angela and her work and access free resources at her Character Lab website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 29:54 Ep. 5: Dr. Rachel Hershenberg – How to Create a Life You Love http://sethgillihan.com/ep-5-dr-rachel-hershenberg-how-to-create-a-life-you-love/ Mon, 13 Aug 2018 09:13:38 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12489 It's hard to build a life we love, and doubly so when we're going through depression. In my conversation with Dr. Rachel Hershenberg, we talk about her recent book, Activating Happiness: A Jump Start Guide to Overcoming Low Motivation, Depression, or Just Feeling Stuck. Rachel's book goes way beyond the simple idea of "doing more activities" to combat depression. As we discuss, certain kinds of activities are more antidepressant than others, and those are the ones where we want to focus our finite energies. I had a great time learning more about Rachel's approach to treating depression; we covered topics including: The effectiveness of behavioral treatment compared to medication for depression How to start as small as necessary to get the ball rolling The big effect of seemingly small decisions Our difficulty in predicting what's going to make us feel well What drives procrastination (it's not laziness!) How to build habits that serve us well Effective ways to cultivate gratitude Early in the episode I mention an article Rachel wrote; here's the blog post where I report those findings: How "Daily Uplifts" Can Counter Depression. Rachel Hershenberg, PhD, is assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, where she also serves as director of psychotherapy in the Treatment Resistant Depression program. She's a productive scholar (see her profile on PubMed) and she received the Career Development Leadership Award in Clinical Research from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Find Rachel at her website and on Emory University's website. It's hard to build a life we love, and doubly so when we're going through depression. In my conversation with Dr. Rachel Hershenberg, we talk about her recent book, Activating Happiness: A Jump Start Guide to Overcoming Low Motivation, Depression, It's hard to build a life we love, and doubly so when we're going through depression. In my conversation with Dr. Rachel Hershenberg, we talk about her recent book, Activating Happiness: A Jump Start Guide to Overcoming Low Motivation, Depression, or Just Feeling Stuck.<br /> <br /> Rachel's book goes way beyond the simple idea of "doing more activities" to combat depression. As we discuss, certain kinds of activities are more antidepressant than others, and those are the ones where we want to focus our finite energies.<br /> <br /> I had a great time learning more about Rachel's approach to treating depression; we covered topics including:<br /> <br /> The effectiveness of behavioral treatment compared to medication for depression<br /> How to start as small as necessary to get the ball rolling<br /> The big effect of seemingly small decisions<br /> Our difficulty in predicting what's going to make us feel well<br /> What drives procrastination (it's not laziness!)<br /> How to build habits that serve us well<br /> Effective ways to cultivate gratitude<br /> <br /> Early in the episode I mention an article Rachel wrote; here's the blog post where I report those findings: How "Daily Uplifts" Can Counter Depression.<br /> <br /> Rachel Hershenberg, PhD, is assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, where she also serves as director of psychotherapy in the Treatment Resistant Depression program. She's a productive scholar (see her profile on PubMed) and she received the Career Development Leadership Award in Clinical Research from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.<br /> <br /> Find Rachel at her website and on Emory University's website. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:27:21 Ep. 4: Dr. Jason Hunt – How to Treat Anxiety with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy http://sethgillihan.com/ep-4-dr-jason-hunt-how-to-treat-anxiety-with-cognitive-behavioral-therapy/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 16:06:25 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12477 This week I talk with Dr. Jason Hunt, a clinical psychologist and owner of Behavioral Health and Anxiety Reduction. Jason has extensive training in evidence-based approaches, and his passion for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and similar interventions is obvious. You'll hear from Jason not only how he uses research-based techniques to treat anxiety, depression, and insomnia, but how he applies CBT principles in his own life. We also talked about: The power of normalizing difficult experiences The imperative of self-care The all-too-common imposter syndrome and fear of failure Maintaining high productivity while staying balanced Novel ways of delivering effective treatments I met Jason 8 years ago when I was on the faculty at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania, and Jason was a practicum student finishing his doctorate. He went on to work at Friends Hospital Philadelphia, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, McGuire Air Force Base, Ancora Psychiatric Hospital in South Jersey, as well as in prisons and various forensic settings (which we discuss). I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did. Learn more about Jason and his practice at his website: Behavioral Health and Anxiety Reduction. This week I talk with Dr. Jason Hunt, a clinical psychologist and owner of Behavioral Health and Anxiety Reduction. Jason has extensive training in evidence-based approaches, and his passion for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and similar interventi... This week I talk with Dr. Jason Hunt, a clinical psychologist and owner of Behavioral Health and Anxiety Reduction. Jason has extensive training in evidence-based approaches, and his passion for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and similar interventions is obvious.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> You'll hear from Jason not only how he uses research-based techniques to treat anxiety, depression, and insomnia, but how he applies CBT principles in his own life.<br /> <br /> We also talked about:<br /> <br /> The power of normalizing difficult experiences<br /> The imperative of self-care<br /> The all-too-common imposter syndrome and fear of failure<br /> Maintaining high productivity while staying balanced<br /> Novel ways of delivering effective treatments<br /> <br /> <br /> I met Jason 8 years ago when I was on the faculty at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania, and Jason was a practicum student finishing his doctorate. He went on to work at Friends Hospital Philadelphia, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, McGuire Air Force Base, Ancora Psychiatric Hospital in South Jersey, as well as in prisons and various forensic settings (which we discuss). I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did.<br /> <br /> Learn more about Jason and his practice at his website: Behavioral Health and Anxiety Reduction. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:49:03 Ep. 3: Dr. Raymond Pasi – Secondary Education in the Twenty-First Century http://sethgillihan.com/ep-3-dr-raymond-pasi-secondary-education-in-the-twenty-first-century/ Wed, 25 Jul 2018 09:23:53 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12462 High school isn't the highlight of life for most of us—it certainly wasn't for me. The four years span our early teenage years through young adulthood, with all the turmoil and transition of adolescence. I've become more interested in the field of education as my own kids have gotten older. They're still in elementary school but already I'm understanding the place of our educators in nurturing students' development—not just academically, but socially and emotionally, too. Our high schools have a big responsibility as they help students navigate many changes. How can teachers, administrators, and parents help young people to emerge from high school with the knowledge and character to meet life's challenges? I turned to Dr. Ray Pasi to help me think through these questions. Ray recently retired after serving 29 years as a high school principal, the last 20 in Yorktown High School in Arlington, VA. He shared his insights on numerous topics in the field of education, including: How teachers can promote student engagement The role of technology (e.g., PowerPoint) in the classroom What makes an excellent teacher The elements of a strong high school The role of schools in students' social and emotional learning The imperative of never giving up on a student The challenge of social media for school administrators The growing concern of safety in schools How parents can evaluate a potential school Ray is an adjunct faculty member in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at The George Washington University, which is how I met him back in 1999. I came across an article in the student newspaper at Yorktown High School that captured the essence of what Ray brought to his work as a principal. Entitled "In Pasi We Trust," the writer concluded, "It is no question that he will be missed, but his legacy is so deeply ingrained in the foundation of the institution that no matter the changes and the new students that enter the doors, Pasi’s mark will forever be left on the outside of 5200 Yorktown Boulevard." Read more in this article about Ray in the Washington Post, from shortly after his arrival at Yorktown: Embracing Academics.       High school isn't the highlight of life for most of us—it certainly wasn't for me. The four years span our early teenage years through young adulthood, with all the turmoil and transition of adolescence. - High school isn't the highlight of life for most of us—it certainly wasn't for me. The four years span our early teenage years through young adulthood, with all the turmoil and transition of adolescence.<br /> <br /> I've become more interested in the field of education as my own kids have gotten older. They're still in elementary school but already I'm understanding the place of our educators in nurturing students' development—not just academically, but socially and emotionally, too.<br /> <br /> Our high schools have a big responsibility as they help students navigate many changes. How can teachers, administrators, and parents help young people to emerge from high school with the knowledge and character to meet life's challenges?<br /> <br /> I turned to Dr. Ray Pasi to help me think through these questions. Ray recently retired after serving 29 years as a high school principal, the last 20 in Yorktown High School in Arlington, VA. He shared his insights on numerous topics in the field of education, including:<br /> <br /> How teachers can promote student engagement<br /> The role of technology (e.g., PowerPoint) in the classroom<br /> What makes an excellent teacher<br /> The elements of a strong high school<br /> The role of schools in students' social and emotional learning<br /> The imperative of never giving up on a student<br /> The challenge of social media for school administrators<br /> The growing concern of safety in schools<br /> How parents can evaluate a potential school<br /> <br /> Ray is an adjunct faculty member in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at The George Washington University, which is how I met him back in 1999.<br /> <br /> I came across an article in the student newspaper at Yorktown High School that captured the essence of what Ray brought to his work as a principal. Entitled "In Pasi We Trust," the writer concluded, "It is no question that he will be missed, but his legacy is so deeply ingrained in the foundation of the institution that no matter the changes and the new students that enter the doors, Pasi’s mark will forever be left on the outside of 5200 Yorktown Boulevard."<br /> <br /> Read more in this article about Ray in the Washington Post, from shortly after his arrival at Yorktown: Embracing Academics.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:07:22 Ep. 2: Dr. Lucy Faulconbridge – Therapy, Weight Loss, and Nutrition http://sethgillihan.com/ep-2-dr-lucy-faulconbridge-therapy-weight-loss-and-nutrition/ Sun, 22 Jul 2018 14:52:55 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12453 In this episode I speak with psychologist Lucy Faulconbridge. Lucy has an extensive background in the biological and psychological bases of eating behaviors and obesity. I found our conversation to be a nice complement to my discussion with Aria in episode 1, as we talked about some similar issues from different angles. We talked about what it's like being a full-time therapist, and shared the view that the work is as challenging as it is fulfilling. The topic of self-care came up, which I have a feeling is going to be a recurrent theme in the Think Act Be podcast. Just a hunch. We shared our experiences of mindfulness, and how we don't have to practice meditation to be mindful. We also addressed the complex meanings that food has in our lives, from nutrition to religious ritual to many others. This complexity contributes to the difficulty so many individuals have with losing weight and keeping it off. I've tried various diets in the past to address some health concerns, and I asked Lucy for her take on the science of good nutrition. She underscored the likelihood that different people do better with different diets, and that any one-size-fits-all approach won't fit all. That's been my impression, as well—that despite our hope for "correct" dietary guidelines, in the end we have to listen to our own bodies and needs and see what sort of foods make us feel the best. Lucy grew up in England and attended the University of St. Andrews. She and I met in our doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania, where we were in the same cohort of clinical psych students. During her graduate training she studied the neuroscience of eating behaviors using rat models. Following her internship and postdoctoral fellowship she joined the faculty at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders in the Psychiatry Department at Penn's School of Medicine, where she served as Director of Research. She currently has a full-time private practice in Wayne, PA, and is a clinical faculty member in the Psychiatry Department at Penn. Find Lucy on the web at www.mainlinetherapist.com. In this episode I speak with psychologist Lucy Faulconbridge. Lucy has an extensive background in the biological and psychological bases of eating behaviors and obesity. I found our conversation to be a nice complement to my discussion with Aria in epi... In this episode I speak with psychologist Lucy Faulconbridge. Lucy has an extensive background in the biological and psychological bases of eating behaviors and obesity. I found our conversation to be a nice complement to my discussion with Aria in episode 1, as we talked about some similar issues from different angles.<br /> <br /> We talked about what it's like being a full-time therapist, and shared the view that the work is as challenging as it is fulfilling. The topic of self-care came up, which I have a feeling is going to be a recurrent theme in the Think Act Be podcast. Just a hunch. We shared our experiences of mindfulness, and how we don't have to practice meditation to be mindful.<br /> <br /> We also addressed the complex meanings that food has in our lives, from nutrition to religious ritual to many others. This complexity contributes to the difficulty so many individuals have with losing weight and keeping it off.<br /> <br /> I've tried various diets in the past to address some health concerns, and I asked Lucy for her take on the science of good nutrition. She underscored the likelihood that different people do better with different diets, and that any one-size-fits-all approach won't fit all. That's been my impression, as well—that despite our hope for "correct" dietary guidelines, in the end we have to listen to our own bodies and needs and see what sort of foods make us feel the best.<br /> <br /> Lucy grew up in England and attended the University of St. Andrews. She and I met in our doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania, where we were in the same cohort of clinical psych students. During her graduate training she studied the neuroscience of eating behaviors using rat models.<br /> <br /> Following her internship and postdoctoral fellowship she joined the faculty at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders in the Psychiatry Department at Penn's School of Medicine, where she served as Director of Research. She currently has a full-time private practice in Wayne, PA, and is a clinical faculty member in the Psychiatry Department at Penn.<br /> <br /> Find Lucy on the web at www.mainlinetherapist.com. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 57:53 Ep. 1: Dr. Aria Campbell-Danesh – Building a Healthier Relationship with Food and Your Body http://sethgillihan.com/ep-1-dr-aria-campbell-danesh/ Mon, 16 Jul 2018 18:35:27 +0000 http://sethgillihan.com/?p=12428 In this first episode, I speak with psychologist Aria Campbell-Danesh. Aria's specialty is helping men and women achieve sustained weight loss by changing their relationship with food and with their bodies. As we've all heard and maybe experienced ourselves, it's hard to lose weight, and even harder to keep it off. Research has shown that not only are diets not effective in the long-term, but many people gain more weight than they lost after going on a diet. So what are we to do if we're carrying extra weight that may be limiting our activities and affecting our health? I was pleased to get Aria's perspective on this issue and to hear about his program, which is based on the latest research findings. Aria uses a variety of tools from mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy to help his clients achieve their goals. We covered a range of topics, including why keeping weight off is even harder than losing it in the first place. Aria sheds light on this question in ways I hadn't considered before. We also discussed how his program differs from our typical approach to weight loss, as it's not a diet in the traditional sense. The focus instead is on the mindset that we bring to health and nutrition. One of the questions I was most curious about had to do with the idea of "moderation." We've all heard this idea tossed around in the context of diets, especially with the abundance of seemingly extreme diets now being promoted—things like the ketogenic diet, with its emphasis on high fat and low carbohydrates, all-raw diets, veganism, and even all-meat diets. I've wondered what people mean exactly when they say "all things in moderation." Do they mean we really should eat some of everything? Or are there some of us who do better by avoiding certain foods entirely, either because they're not good for us or because we'll gorge ourselves on them if we open that door? I found Aria's answer very illuminating, and a good example of how subtle shifts in our mindset have potentially big effects on our behavior and health. I look forward to hearing your comments about this episode. Aria is Scottish (as you'll hear in his accent), and attended St. Andrews University. He and I met in 2010 when he was a visiting student at the University of Pennsylvania, where I was on the faculty at the time. After returning to the UK, Aria completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at University College London. He lives in England with his wife and their dog Alfie. Find out more about Aria's approach on his website where you can sign up for his newsletter and get tips for mindful eating. You can also follow him on Instagram and Twitter. In this first episode, I speak with psychologist Aria Campbell-Danesh. Aria's specialty is helping men and women achieve sustained weight loss by changing their relationship with food and with their bodies. - In this first episode, I speak with psychologist Aria Campbell-Danesh. Aria's specialty is helping men and women achieve sustained weight loss by changing their relationship with food and with their bodies.<br /> <br /> As we've all heard and maybe experienced ourselves, it's hard to lose weight, and even harder to keep it off. Research has shown that not only are diets not effective in the long-term, but many people gain more weight than they lost after going on a diet.<br /> <br /> So what are we to do if we're carrying extra weight that may be limiting our activities and affecting our health? I was pleased to get Aria's perspective on this issue and to hear about his program, which is based on the latest research findings. Aria uses a variety of tools from mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy to help his clients achieve their goals.<br /> <br /> We covered a range of topics, including why keeping weight off is even harder than losing it in the first place. Aria sheds light on this question in ways I hadn't considered before. We also discussed how his program differs from our typical approach to weight loss, as it's not a diet in the traditional sense. The focus instead is on the mindset that we bring to health and nutrition.<br /> <br /> One of the questions I was most curious about had to do with the idea of "moderation." We've all heard this idea tossed around in the context of diets, especially with the abundance of seemingly extreme diets now being promoted—things like the ketogenic diet, with its emphasis on high fat and low carbohydrates, all-raw diets, veganism, and even all-meat diets.<br /> <br /> I've wondered what people mean exactly when they say "all things in moderation." Do they mean we really should eat some of everything? Or are there some of us who do better by avoiding certain foods entirely, either because they're not good for us or because we'll gorge ourselves on them if we open that door?<br /> <br /> I found Aria's answer very illuminating, and a good example of how subtle shifts in our mindset have potentially big effects on our behavior and health. I look forward to hearing your comments about this episode.<br /> <br /> Aria is Scottish (as you'll hear in his accent), and attended St. Andrews University. He and I met in 2010 when he was a visiting student at the University of Pennsylvania, where I was on the faculty at the time. After returning to the UK, Aria completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at University College London. He lives in England with his wife and their dog Alfie.<br /> <br /> Find out more about Aria's approach on his website where you can sign up for his newsletter and get tips for mindful eating. You can also follow him on Instagram and Twitter. Seth J. Gillihan, PhD: Clinical Psychologist, Author, Blogger clean 1:34:02